Relay Rack Installation

PanzerBoxb

2[H]4U
Joined
Dec 12, 2004
Messages
2,107
I have been tasked (read: family slave labor) to install a relay rack to house the equipment for a small business in a new building. We are brining in all the phone (CAT3), network (CAT6), video (RG6), and surveillance (RG59+power) cables (PIC) into one small room. I believe I have all the equipment necessary except for one thing. I would like to brace the top of the relay rack to the rear wall to ensure stability. None of the dealers of rack equipment that I have visited seem to have anything for that purpose, yet I see pictures (ala the Networking Gallery) showing this to be a standard practice. Can someone provide a recommendation or point me towards some references for such a project? Are there any obstacles I should be aware of?
 

Zamboni

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 1, 2004
Messages
1,074
The technical term is "ladder racks" for connecting two-legged telecom/relay racks to the walls and to each other. All of our racks were anchored to the walls with them, so I know there's a standard connector out there.
 

Kaos

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Oct 14, 2003
Messages
1,328
chatsworth makes wall mount racks and enclosure, the enclosures arent cheap but come hinged and with keys.

I have a 4ft rack in my bedroom that used to be wall mount and I just adapted to a rolling rack...thinking of chopping a few U's off to make some of it desk mount.
 

amenthes

Limp Gawd
Joined
Sep 21, 2005
Messages
324
http://www.chatsworth.com/Product_Docs/10250_CUT.PDF

It is called Ladder Rack by everyone, however the product name @ Chatsworth is "Cable Runway".

You'll need three things.
1. The ladder rack itself.
2. An "L" bracket to mount to the wall (http://www.chatsworth.com/Product_Docs/11421_CUT.PDF)
3. Four "J" bolts (per section of ladder rack: http://www.chatsworth.com/Product_Docs/10595_CUT.PDF)

The L bracket goes on the wall with the flat surface facing up. This provides a surface for the ladder rack to rest on. The J bolts go through the L bracket and the rack, up and over the ladder rack to pull it down onto the rack/bracket and secure it in place.

Note that this is intented to provide a pathway to run cable. It IS NOT intended to secure the rack in place, I.E. it is not a "structural" connection. The rack MUST be bolted into the ground. In case of an earthquake, the ladder rack would shear off instantly.

Here's Chatsworth's page with all of their ladder rack stuff. Theres all kinda of nifty stuff you can do: http://www.chatsworth.com/main.asp?id=103
 
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