Red Falcon's Retrocomputing Thread!

w1retap

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They're beasts. We been running them 24/7/365 since 2002/2003. In that time period, they've probably only been powered off 3 or 4 times at most, and only have reboots for required engineered software changes that need it. I think the last time some of them were rebooted was 3 or 4 years ago. They are the most stable computers I've ever used. (OpenVMS operating system)
 

SamirD

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And this is why I love the computers of yesterday--dead reliable stability. Today's systems stability would have been considered flaky garbage by yesterday's standards, except with servers--today's servers are quite stable. I know I only had to reboot my 2950 twice in a year--and that was when running it as a desktop, lol.
 

Red Falcon

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Thank you for posting these servers!!! I hate seeing equipment like this thrown away (there's a guy in CA on reddit homelabsales with some Dell 2850s and 1750s that's needing to just get rid of them and everyone there tells him to throw them away even though they look brand new aside from some dust). People don't realize how ungodly expensive this equipment was back in its day. Hell, even my DL380 g5 from just a decade ago msrp'd at over $7000! And this is a regular plain-jane server that wasn't top of the line or anything. That Dell 6600 had to cost north of $30k at the time. :eek: Lovely rack and setup! Thank you for sharing!
Thank you for your kind words!
You are right, those servers were insanely expensive, and the Intel Xeon MP 3.0GHz CPUs in them cost around $3600 each back in Q1 2004 - glad they aren't anywhere near that now. :eek:

Ouch, those poor Dell 2850s and 1750s deserve better, and new life can easily be breathed into them for a modest cost.
The PowerEdge 6600 was apparently used as a phone and voice system from the mid-2000s to up until a few years ago, and shockingly, there was almost no dust at all in the unit, and the fans were totally clean.

At the university I worked for back in the 2000s, we had a PowerEdge 6600 that hosted our website, help desk ticket system, print sharing, and file sharing over a SAN via 2Gbps fiber.
It was a joy to work on and maintain, so being able to find one in such mint condition, and being able to do real production work on it again over 15 years later, was a real treat.

Nice, those DL380 units were, and still are, tanks and have held up extremely well over the years - I'm glad you still have yours! (y)

Nice rack. Those were used for the Compaq Alpha line of server equipment. I have quite a few at work we just recently tossed, and still have several in service racked up with the matching Alpha DS10's, DS20E's, quorum disk arrays, RAID arrays, etc. Next year we are finally replacing our last production Alpha's. Luckily I grabbed some before scrapping this past go-around of upgrade replacements.
Thank you, I had bought it from said university nearly a decade ago, and ironically enough, it did have Compaq Alpha equipment within it - good memory!
Unfortunately, I wasn't able to purchase any of that equipment, but getting the 42U rack for $75 was a great deal.

Nice, I'm glad you were able to get some of that gear as well before it is phased out completely.
I'm impressed that all of that equipment has been in service this whole time, and is still running.

When most individuals think of Compaq, they always remember their desktops and laptops from the late 1990s and 2000s, which admittedly weren't that great.
However, their desktops and laptops from the 1980s were rock-solid (and are some of the first clone IBM PCs), and their server and enterprise equipment was absolutely amazing, both in reliability and longevity.

It will be sad to see the rest of those Alpha systems finally be retired, but perhaps you can get your hands on a few more of them before they reach their final destination. ;)
 

SamirD

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Thank you for your kind words!
You are right, those servers were insanely expensive, and the Intel Xeon MP 3.0GHz CPUs in them cost around $3600 each back in Q1 2004 - glad they aren't anywhere near that now. :eek:

Ouch, those poor Dell 2850s and 1750s deserve better, and new life can easily be breathed into them for a modest cost.
The PowerEdge 6600 was apparently used as a phone and voice system from the mid-2000s to up until a few years ago, and shockingly, there was almost no dust at all in the unit, and the fans were totally clean.

At the university I worked for back in the 2000s, we had a PowerEdge 6600 that hosted our website, help desk ticket system, print sharing, and file sharing over a SAN via 2Gbps fiber.
It was a joy to work on and maintain, so being able to find one in such mint condition, and being able to do real production work on it again over 15 years later, was a real treat.

Nice, those DL380 units were, and still are, tanks and have held up extremely well over the years - I'm glad you still have yours! (y)


Thank you, I had bought it from said university nearly a decade ago, and ironically enough, it did have Compaq Alpha equipment within it - good memory!
Unfortunately, I wasn't able to purchase any of that equipment, but getting the 42U rack for $75 was a great deal.

Nice, I'm glad you were able to get some of that gear as well before it is phased out completely.
I'm impressed that all of that equipment has been in service this whole time, and is still running.

When most individuals think of Compaq, they always remember their desktops and laptops from the late 1990s and 2000s, which admittedly weren't that great.
However, their desktops and laptops from the 1980s were rock-solid (and are some of the first clone IBM PCs), and their server and enterprise equipment was absolutely amazing, both in reliability and longevity.

It will be sad to see the rest of those Alpha systems finally be retired, but perhaps you can get your hands on a few more of them before they reach their final destination. ;)
I keep forgetting how expensive top of the line new processors cost...ah the great thing about picking up old stuff, lol.

Yes they certainly do. I hate people bashing older hardware that's perfectly working. To steal a line from the movie Seabiscuit, "You don't throw away a whole life just because it's banged up a little." I think the same applies to servers that are still ready to run, but maybe just not the bleeding edge. And there's nothing wrong with that in my book, especially when a 13 kid with an interest and aptitude for servers will be able to afford it and sink his/her teeth into it. That's much more value than the scrap metal anyday.

Super cool to know how much the 6600 could do back in its day. :)

I remebmer the compaqs of old and they were the first PC clones that gave IBM a run for their money. I believe they were also instrumental to establishing the EISA standard which brought 32-bit and still retained backward compatability--something that MCA, PCI, and PCIe have all failed to do even when they could have been designed to do so. HP I think has done a good job of incorporating compaq into HP and a lot of the HP lineup of today started out as compaq machines. :)

Those alphas will be just as awesome in their second life. I just hope that they get one!
 
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