Record-Setting Hard Drive Writes Information One Atom At A Time

Megalith

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An atomic-scale rewritable data-storage device capable of packing 500 terabits onto a single square inch is here. Chlorine atoms are manipulated on a copper surface to simulate binary switching, resulting in a one-of-a-kind hard drive.

This atomic hard drive, developed by Sander Otte and his colleagues at Delft University, features a storage density that’s 500 times larger than state-of-the-art hard disk drives. At 500 terabits per square inch, it has the potential to store the entire contents of the US Library of Congress in a 0.1-mm wide cube. The new system, described in the latest issue of Nature Nanotechnology, still requires considerable work before it’s ready for prime time, but it’s an important proof-of-principle that lays the groundwork for the development of useable atomic-scale data storage devices.
 
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So either the read/write time is stupid fast because of how small of an area it can write in, or its stupid long because of how much it can fit into such a small space and it has to look even harder for the correct info.
 

Lunas

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An atomic-scale rewritable data-storage device capable of packing 500 terabits onto a single square inch is here. Chlorine atoms are manipulated on a copper surface to simulate binary switching, resulting in a one-of-a-kind hard drive.

This atomic hard drive, developed by Sander Otte and his colleagues at Delft University, features a storage density that’s 500 times larger than state-of-the-art hard disk drives. At 500 terabits per square inch, it has the potential to store the entire contents of the US Library of Congress in a 0.1-mm wide cube. The new system, described in the latest issue of Nature Nanotechnology, still requires considerable work before it’s ready for prime time, but it’s an important proof-of-principle that lays the groundwork for the development of useable atomic-scale data storage devices.
My guess is read and write speeds and physical durability are challenges to overcome.
 

Ur_Mom

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This would introduce a lot of errors, I'd think. From any particle whatsoever to radiation to any movement. A lot of refinement is needed, but great proof of concept. We can get down that small, that is awesome. :) Give it 50 years and I'm sure it'll be commonplace.

Of course, if Steve had posted it, it'd mention something about the T-800 having enough space for detailed files on everyone, including Miles Dyson (which if they had detailed files, how come they didn't know what Sarah Connor looked like in 1984?). It's the new Skynet core!
 

Dekoth-E-

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Why does everyone today feel this need to explain things using really terrible looking flash style videos?
 

nutzo

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So when are they going to increase that to 3 bits per atom?

I'm sure that won't hurt the long term reliability.
 
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