Recommendations for home viewing of medical imaging

reductant

Limp Gawd
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
305
Hello, I am looking for a 21.5-24" LED backlit monitor that would be good for viewing X-rays/CTs/MRIs. The monitor would be for home use. Would an IPS panel provide the best image quality considering black/white/grey color variations will be pretty important? Any recommendations for particular brands? Anyways, any input would be great. Thanks!
 

Inu

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 29, 2004
Messages
2,022
I guess something with a VA panel would be best due to enhanced contrast levels which provides very good blacks? I have no actual models to suggest.

Or you could go TV doctor mode and get a 42" ultra slim plasma, thats on a swing arm more expensive than the display itself.
 

rocket733

Limp Gawd
Joined
May 4, 2006
Messages
268
If you're a doctor then I would recommend that you talk to your tech dept since specialized displays must be used.

If you're part of a tech dept and have received such a request then I would contact a vendor who sells such displays so they can walk you through a purchase.

In either case I wouldn't buy a general consumer monitor and expect to review actual patient images; I'm sure that's a great basis for a negligence lawsuit should something ever go wrong.
 

tk-don

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
324
Hmm.. The first thing you'd have to consider is whether the display must be compliant to DICOM part 14 or just the standard sRGB gamma curve- the former mostly regards displays with an extremely high brightness, and mostly monochrome displays - but it is also applicable to color displays. I'm just saying this, since monitors for medical applications are mostly DICOM certified in some way.

Regarding panel technologies, i'd definitely steer clear of VA based panels for this particular task, since the slightest deviation in the gamma factor may cause certain dark parts of for example an x-ray to become invisible or darker at least. From what I understand, the contrast is important here, but subtle details and deviations are also extrmeley important since some x-rays may be less stellar than others. I'm not saying all VA panels would be bad for this task - it's merely from judging from the probability of this occurance from what is out there and the method of operation for VA panels in general. Of course it would be possible to adjust the gamma in some way, but it will affect the accuracy of other shades.

There are many choices for brands out there - i'd take a look at Barco, Eizo and NEC for this task. Maybe even consider buying used, sunce huge savings may be achieveable. But it would be nice if you could specify a budget and whether it must be a normal computer monitor or extremely bright monocrome display :)
ACtually, if you're on a tighter budget, Eizo offers "medical grade" PVA based panel for a very low price compared to the IPS equipped models. So if the monitor is for different kinds of previews (and not for a final review), this should be fine.
 
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reductant

Limp Gawd
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
305
Great! I'll look into the Eizo PVAs. Haha, I'm not planning to use it for actual patient care, so no worries there, just for my own personal training. We use Barco's at the hospital, so I don't need to shell out that kind of money. Just looking for a step up over my TN gaming panel.

The only LED backlit PVAs I can find are
BenQ VW2420H ($400)
BenQ EW2420H ($280)
Asus ML249H ($250)
 
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tk-don

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
324
Is it very important that it is LED backlit (edge lit)?
I'd also take a closer look at IPS panels with (at least) an 8 bit panel, so maybe the HP ZR24W.
Samsung is also going to release a few monitors in 24" and 27" with a new display technology called "S-PLS", which should be more like an IPS display in performance. Like LG, they do not promise a higher contrast ratio than 1000:1, but who knows if it's achievable in real life. Apparently they are going to be LED edgelit.
 

Whoisthisreally

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Feb 14, 2009
Messages
1,143
This forum would be a disservice if you were not directed to the NEC 90 series with spectraview DICOM calibration.
 

ArtMarshall

NEC Product Manager
Joined
Feb 3, 2010
Messages
148
Hi reductant,

You will want a DICOM gamma curve to properly see all of the detail that you are looking for.

I can't speak to the other manufacturers' products but the NEC MultiSync PA Series can work in a DICOM mode based on the factory calibration. Here's a short whitepaper on how to enable the mode: http://goo.gl/1Qe5n

The PA231W (23" e-IPS panel) would be a good, inexpensive display for your application.

I hope that this helps!

-- Art
 
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