Question about connecting to networks through VPN with the same local IP structure

ComputerBox34

Right in the Box
Joined
Nov 12, 2003
Messages
11,655
I setup a clients office with the same IP structure as the one I did on my own personal network (10.0.1.x/255.255.255.0). When I connect to his network via L2TP/IPSEC VPN, this poses a problem when I try to hit something on his network - Windows defaults to looking on my own network.

Is there a way to force windows to go out over the VPN or even change the IP structure of the network locally on the machine - for instance 10.0.2.x that translates to 10.0.1.x on the remote network?
 

/usr/home

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Mar 18, 2008
Messages
6,161
You can NAT between the two but it can get a bit ugly.
 
Last edited:

mwarps

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 6, 2002
Messages
7,015
You have an entire Class A, 16 Class Bs and 256 Class Cs available to you, and you *know* it's going to interfere. Change your address scheme. Good lord.
 

gimp

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jul 25, 2008
Messages
10,117
or disable split-tunneling on the VPN client, so that it can't access your network when you're connected to the VPN tunnel?
 

RocketTech

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 7, 2009
Messages
2,359
You could double-NAT, but smart money is on changing address scheme on one end or the other. I use 172.16[-31].(2 or 3 digit ZIP).network for businesses I manage. 172 address space is comparatively rare, as most use 10.x.x.x or 192.168.x.x. Use something uncommon in the 10.x.x.x range on your own network, say 10.198.207.1 and I would be surprised if you EVER have a network collision. It would be ok to use the same 172.16.x.nnn for networks that will never connect- say businesses with separate owners, but I like to use discrete addresses for businesses to avoid my own confusion.
 

diizzy

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
2,602
..or just go with something different than 192.168.1.X/24 , 192.168.0.X/24
//Danne
 
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