Q6600 Temps? Whats too hot?

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by jfespinoza, Dec 18, 2007.

  1. jfespinoza

    jfespinoza [H]Lite

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    I have my Q6600 OC'd to 3.0GHz right now and when I run CPU Stability test on CPU Warming only it gets my CPU up to 60C. That seems crazy hot to me.

    CPU Stability Test Download
     
  2. TWO515TY

    TWO515TY Limp Gawd

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    It's not too bad, especially considering these chips can run at 70°C+. Most people load in the high 50's, so 60 isn't much to be worried about, although you should be able to get lower temps with the right setup. What cooler are you using? What case?
     
  3. jfespinoza

    jfespinoza [H]Lite

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    I'm Using a Silverstone NT-01 w/ a Scythe Ultra Kaze 120mm fan (moves 133cfm) And I have a case w/ 1 120mm fan and 1 80mm fan with the side panel off. I am working on customizing a case at the moment. Going to have 4 Ultra Kaze 120mm fans and 2 Ultra Kaze 80mm fans w/ a mesh side panel.

    My CPU run cool when I use Prime95(34C Tops) but that CPU Stability Test murders my CPU.
     
  4. thatbiggbadwolfy

    thatbiggbadwolfy Limp Gawd

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    Mine runs at around 52C using an orthos benchmark where CPU is used 100%. And 46c on gaming. Q6600 at 3.0
     
  5. MrE

    MrE 2[H]4U

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    Also, what stepping is that Q6600? (B3/G0) That will also have a good difference (B3 stepping 110watt / G0 95 watt) on temps.
     
  6. jfespinoza

    jfespinoza [H]Lite

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    I'm trying to figure that out. On CPU-Z under stepping it says B but under Revision it says G0
     
  7. rainman

    rainman [H]ard|Gawd

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    B is the stepping. G0 is the revision. B3 would show for a B3 revision processor.

    Check your CPU box for a 5-letter code beginning with S. That code will tell you for sure.



    For a G0 processor, the maximum temperature is 71 C as measured at the center of the IHS. You cannot measure this temperature without modifying your heat sink. So, we approximate it with the core temperatures. The laws of physics would tell us that since the cores create the heat and the heat moves to the IHS from the cores (enthalpy)...that it is physically impossible for the IHS to be warmer than the cores. Therefore, if you keep the core temperatures under 71 C, your IHS will be cooler than 71 C.

    A good rule of thumb is to have a margin of error. Pick 65 C or 60 C (or lower) as your "don't exceed" temperature based on personal assumption of risk (theoretically higher risk with higher temperatures).
     
  8. jfespinoza

    jfespinoza [H]Lite

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    Okay mine says SLACR G0. Anyways can some w/ an OC'd Q6600 please run this stability test for about an hour under cpu warming only and tell me the temps you get.

     
  9. trick0502

    trick0502 [H]ardness Supreme

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    so when you say my temp is XXXc, is that the temp of one of the cores, or the cpu?
     
  10. Ste

    Ste Gawd

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    Where does intel say this?
    May I please have a Link?
     
  11. jfespinoza

    jfespinoza [H]Lite

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    The CPU in general, but I was watching the cores also and they seemed pretty even across w/ about 1-3C +/- difference. The highest I seen it was 62-63C but only when I run the CPU Warming only test on that CPU stress test Other apps and stress test don't even get it over 46-47C.
     
  12. jfespinoza

    jfespinoza [H]Lite

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    Here!!!
     
  13. echn111

    echn111 [H]ard|Gawd

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    60c is nothing. I stress test with prime run continously 24/7 over several days and, after my waterloop warms up, my four CPU cores are around 60c to 65c during that time. System works fine.

    My fans still run at low speed when stressing my system. Personally I'd rather have a hot quiet system, then a cool system since I know the CPU can easily handle such temps.

    I wouldn't worry.
     
  14. Ste

    Ste Gawd

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    Thanks, much apreeciated
     
  15. jfespinoza

    jfespinoza [H]Lite

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    Can you do me a favor and run CPU Stability Test and tell me how hot your CPU gets? Run it under CPU Warming Only.
     
  16. anime4u

    anime4u [H]ard|Gawd

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    I would say anything over 70c is too hot for me.
     
  17. rainman

    rainman [H]ard|Gawd

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    You can also read the secret squirrel Intel processor temp document in the sticky thread by graysky.
     
  18. tissimo

    tissimo Limp Gawd

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    so the cpu tester runs hotter then prime? is that even possible?
     
  19. Sphere

    Sphere 2[H]4U

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    Anything over 60c on a daily basis is too hot for me.
     
  20. Slade

    Slade 2[H]4U

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    I ran prime >48 hours with avg temps from the mid 50s to 60s... works fine for me now.
     
  21. bbz_Ghost

    bbz_Ghost 2[H]4U

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    You could run a Q6600 at 1C below the thermal shutdown temp for years without issues. People simply focus entirely too much on temps these days, they really do. 60C for a C2Q is nearly effortless and would run many years without a single issue, I'd say.

    Intel does know what they're doing, you know. If the CPU is rated to run up to a certain temp, that means it'll run up to the temp for a really really long time.

    Don't worry about the temps so much. Worry about fans that die and can't keep the CPU cool; that's where the proper focus should be. Worry about proper airflow in a case (more fans != better cooling). Proper airflow = proper cooling.
     
  22. jfespinoza

    jfespinoza [H]Lite

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    Hell yes!!! My Q6600 @3.0GHz w/ a 1.35 VCore my CPU barely touches 41C's after running for 12hrs under in-place large FFT (Max Heat Test) in Prime95 But CPU Stability Test 6.0 w/ the CPU Warming Only selected runs my CPU hot as hell.... It's crazy, so which app should I trust?

    I was thinking CPU Stability 6.0 runs my CPU way harder then any app or game could.
     
  23. BillParrish

    BillParrish [H]ardness Supreme

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    The cpu tester program would be used to ensure your thermal control methods could withstand anything you can throw at the processer and control the heat.

    Prime is testing the accuracy of math solutions in a fairly stressful situation.

    So they are two different animals. Trust both.

    If you do not generate a PROCHOT interupt (delta to Tjunction goes to zero, use core temp with the option "show delta to Tjunction" checked) you know from a thermal stand point you most likely would never be running the processor at what the cpu defines as "HOT" unless a fan fails etc.

    If prime does not generate errors you vailidate the cpu can handle complex instructions and calculations with out generating a error.

    So one tests the thermal soltuion.
    The other test the cpus accuracy/performance/stability at the desired settings.
    Both provide useful information.

    Be aware that games stress the cpu to MCH to memory and cpu to MCH to video card in ways neither of these programs simulate.
     
  24. Dark Shade

    Dark Shade [H]ard|Gawd

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    I run a B3 stepping at 1.3v, 400x7 (2.8GHz) to keep 1:1 RAM ratio, had to bump the memory voltage up 0.1+, but I idle just under 50C. I have an extremely hot B3 but I don't really care, if it goes out I'll get another.

    It's funny, it'll do 400x7 but refuses to do 333x9.
     
  25. trick0502

    trick0502 [H]ardness Supreme

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    i have a b3 also, mine runs great at 333x9 with 1.285v in bios and cpuz showing 1.25 in windows. idles in the low to mid 30's. i would make sure you cpu cool ic mounted correctly.
     
  26. Dark Shade

    Dark Shade [H]ard|Gawd

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    Yeah it's mounted correctly, remounted it many many times. It's just either a bad HSF or a very hot B3, as I've lapped the IHS and the HSF and I still can't get under 45C
     
  27. trick0502

    trick0502 [H]ardness Supreme

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    with your temps so high on a low overclock it makes me wonder what your temps are at stock settings. about the same?
     
  28. Erasmus354

    Erasmus354 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    As was stated before, people are far too superstitious about their temperatures, they seem to pick some arbitrary number for no reason. The chip wont be damaged until the temperature goes over 100C. That 71C temperature is what the chip is rated to correctly operate at given it is running default speed. The chip can actually most likely work correctly at even much higher temperatures.

    Now, the chip is more stable with lower temperatures, which is why you can overclock better with lower temperatures. Bottom line however, if your chip is stable and if your not triggering the built in auto shutdown, your fine. It's as simple as that.
     
  29. Arcygenical

    Arcygenical Will Watercool for Crack

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    As Erasmus said, the intel specification for heat changes depending on operating frequency. Both the TDP and TcaseMax increase linearly with mhz changes, and exponentially with voltage changes.

    Laptop silicon is rated up to 100c (Core Duo chips in the Macbook Pros) and GPU silicon is rated to around 125c.
     
  30. echn111

    echn111 [H]ard|Gawd

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    Ok, ran it for 5 minutes (under CPU warming) and my core temps never exceeded 55. (for people who care about CPU temp, it never exceeded 45.). Some cores showed utilization of 70%+ while others stayed in the 30%'s.

    For comparision, 5 minutes of Prime led to higher overall temps. Temps of one core reached 56c. Prime looks like a more stressful on the CPU than the CPU stability test on CPU warming only. All 4 cores showed constant CPU utilization of 100%.

    Please keep in mind that I only ran the stress tests for a few minutes rather than the 5 days 24/7 that I normally do (where my core temps stablize at between 60 to 65c)
     
  31. BillParrish

    BillParrish [H]ardness Supreme

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    Please carefully read the definition of that 71C number. here it is for the clickly challenged. Highlights are mine.

    OK
    1) You cannot (without some pretty sophisticated modifications, which are outlined in reference document ) determine Tcase. You have to cut a grove in the IHS etc.

    2) As you might have noticed coretemp etc. can read the "distance to Tjunction" and this is dead accurate. When the distance to Tjunction in coretemp reads zero the Intel Thermal Monitor is activated and the processor sends out a PROCHOT# interrupt. Be aware this is not an absolute I am going to burn up temp, approximately 20-25 deg C above this "I am too hot !!! signal from the CPU the catastrophic temp trip point is reached and the CPU will just shut itself down. It is widely accepted that Tjunction for duals is 85C and quads is 100C and some of the new quads 105C.

    This is what you should be reading to understand how it works and what the max is. Basically you can run with a core temp 1 deg under Tjunction 24x7x365 and from a thermal standpoint never exceed Intel's functional parameters. I do not recommend that and I personally stay at least 10 to 20C under. Its your stuff do what you want, you cant kill the CPU with heat, it will just shutdown and cool off and most likely be good to go, However common sense would tend to lead one to believe that this would not a be a good thing to have happening all the time.

    Here is the real deal if you want to talk about C2D 6600 thermal issues.

    All document are here : http://www.intel.com/design/core2quad/documentation.htm

    The Thermal and Mechanical Design Guidelines for the Q6600 are here :
    http://download.intel.com/design/processor/designex/31559406.pdf

    Section 4 Thermal Management Logic Thermal Monitor Feature is written in a mostly non-technical way and easily understood.

    The second piece of the puzzle is the MSR register mentioned in the document above that contains the data from the Thermal sensor. What information that is available there is found in the actual data sheet document for the CPU:

    http://www.intel.com/design/processor/datashts/315592.htm

    The only important bit as far as this discussion goes is (again highlights are mine) :

    From the Intel data sheet here is the definition of PROCHOT in case you are lost.

    And the last most important thing, is the software register on the CPU that contains a number that is the "number of deg C to assertion of PROCHOT" think of it as a countdown. When it hits zero = CPU too hot. This is what coretemp etc. is reading and doing the math and giving you a coretemp with. To see the actual number and learn how many deg C of "headroom" you have until the CPU puts out the I am too hot PROCHOT, just go into coretemp/options and check the "show delta to Tjunction " option.


    If you are really interested or do not trust coretemp etc. to give you a proper reading YOU CAN ACCESS THE DATA YOURSELF giving you the countdown number directly. Here is the procedure.
    http://www.hardforum.com/showpost.php?p=1031080147&postcount=5

    In the post above the result pulled from the cpu <SR register is 2E hexidecimal. which equals 46 in decimal. This says that the cpu is running 46 deg C BELOW the assertion of PROCHOT, it is obvious this example was done at cpu idle. Again , just use the options in Coretemp to display "show delta to Tjunction" same thing and you do not have to fool with the hex to decimal conversion.

    You may wish notice the date, this horse was beat to death many months ago.

    Moral of story, use coretemp etc. and use the "show distance to Tjunction" or "show raw data" depending on the software used, to determine what the deg C in thermal headroom you have. This eliminates any math and guessing what Tjunction really is for your CPU, it just tells you in absolute deg C how much headroom you have until the factory calibrated "I am too HOT !!! " kicks in. Easy. Enable TM2 in the bios. It will not interfer with your overclock and should generate an alarm of some kind if the cpu does get to PROCHOT. Check your manual or query the tech support for your motherboard.
     
  32. jfespinoza

    jfespinoza [H]Lite

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    I ran coretemp to see what the differences would be between my Abit uGuru software (provided w/ my mobo) and core temp. Core Temp was over by +10C. Is Abit uGuru off by 10C's or is Core Temp lieing?
     
  33. trick0502

    trick0502 [H]ardness Supreme

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    i would say coretemp is correct. the asus utility that came with my mb reports the wrong temp with older bios's. maybe a bios update would help you too.
     
  34. Dark Shade

    Dark Shade [H]ard|Gawd

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    Yup about the same. I don't mind 2.8GHz though it seems I always seem to get the bad batches as my 8800 GTS runs hot too, idles at 70C according to Speedfan and nTune. For once I would like to get a good overclocker or something that just runs cool, but I always get a firecracker.

    I don't think it's an airflow thing either, I have a 90mm side intake fan, a 90mm front intake fan and a 92mm rear exhaust fan up by the heatsink. Plenty of cool air moving about, and the Tuniq Tower is barely above ambient to the touch, and that sucker is pressed as hard against that processor as I'd like
     
  35. trick0502

    trick0502 [H]ardness Supreme

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    i got 3 120mm in and 1 120mm out and one 200mm out (antec 900). get some bigger fans.