Preference for updating BIOS

Joined
Nov 25, 2020
Messages
30
I buy Asus boards, and up until now I've only updated the BIOS using the EZ Upgrade method through their Windows software. Last November I picked up a Crosshair VIII Hero (wifi) to go with my 5900x, and was introduced to the EZ Flash method out of necessity. It's worked so far, but I've also heard horror stories of people bricking their mobos.

So, for the crowd here: Is one method actually safer than the other?

Also, why haven't mfgs. built backup systems into their board yet where the existing BIOS is backed up in case of failure during apply.
 

pitingres

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jul 25, 2018
Messages
268
On the surface, I'd expect the EZ Flash to be safer as it doesn't depend on Windows not crashing while it's running.

You don't see backup systems on many boards because it would generally require more and/or larger BIOS prom chips and support logic, adding cost for a very rarely performed operation.
 

motqalden

[H]ard|DCOTM x4
Joined
Jun 22, 2009
Messages
2,592
Flashing from bios is always safer as there is less that can go wrong. I usually take the extra step of reseting bios defaults to remove and ram overclocks im running and reboot before doing it just in case.
 

vegeta535

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jul 19, 2013
Messages
8,521
I do it from with in the bios. Less likely for anything to happen. I will only use any flash back if I have no other choice or the MB has a outdated BIOS that doesn't support a current CPU.
 

Kerby1280

n00b
Joined
Aug 18, 2006
Messages
49
I do it from with in the bios. Less likely for anything to happen. I will only use any flash back if I have no other choice or the MB has a outdated BIOS that doesn't support a current CPU.
Exactly. I always do it within the bios and never had issues. I would only use the EZ Flash as a last resort.
 

pendragon1

Extremely [H]
Joined
Oct 7, 2000
Messages
39,953
flashing in bios is technically safer but ive never had an issue with a windows based tool either. a lot of new boards and oem systems will now receive bios updates via windows update and apply them at reboot, its kinda handy. also, gigabyte makes(or did) lots of boards with dual(a backup) bioses.
 

chameleoneel

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
5,792
I buy Asus boards, and up until now I've only updated the BIOS using the EZ Upgrade method through their Windows software. Last November I picked up a Crosshair VIII Hero (wifi) to go with my 5900x, and was introduced to the EZ Flash method out of necessity. It's worked so far, but I've also heard horror stories of people bricking their mobos.

So, for the crowd here: Is one method actually safer than the other?

Also, why haven't mfgs. built backup systems into their board yet where the existing BIOS is backed up in case of failure during apply.
Some boards do have a "dual bios", so that you can restore after a failed Bios. However, the feature has fallen a bit out of favor and is back to typically only featured on some of the most expensive boards. Bios are so large nowadays, I guess the bios chips are relatively more expensive and board manufactures keep pinching where they can, with tighter margins.

Flashing within the bios/before windows, is the safest. But there is always a risk of bricking. It should be covered by warranty, however. As long as you aren't using a third party flashing utility.
 

Tobit

[H]ard|DCer of the Month - March 2010/May 2011
Joined
Dec 12, 2005
Messages
5,145
I love Asus's Flashback on the boards that have it. Stick the bin on a USB stick, insert, press a button.
 
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
Messages
3,171
I highly prefer to go through the bios to update. Load optimized defaults -> reboot -> update bios. Probably done this hundreds of times now and almost no failures/issues.
 

grumperfish

Weaksauce
Joined
Apr 19, 2014
Messages
116
I always use the BIOS/UEFI update methods, except for on Dells as they've long managed to get Windows BIOS updates working without issues. I'm not sure I'd trust an in-Windows BIOS patch on other manufacturer boards.

Gigabyte sticks dual-BIOS on most of their more expensive boards. I've only needed to rely on it once when a 5ghz attempt (with what turned out to be a faulty RAM module) forced a hard reboot and the main BIOS failed over.
 

Skull_Angel

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 31, 2010
Messages
1,664
Flashing from bios is always safer as there is less that can go wrong. I usually take the extra step of reseting bios defaults to remove and ram overclocks im running and reboot before doing it just in case.
I highly prefer to go through the bios to update. Load optimized defaults -> reboot -> update bios. Probably done this hundreds of times now and almost no failures/issues.
This is usually the safest solution and you're going to have to manually input all your [old] settings any way [some of which may not work], since <fanfare> new bios.
 

GiGaBiTe

2[H]4U
Joined
Apr 26, 2013
Messages
2,160
Flashing from bios is always safer as there is less that can go wrong. I usually take the extra step of reseting bios defaults to remove and ram overclocks im running and reboot before doing it just in case.

I used to think that until I recently had several boards in a row which were bricked with the EZ-Flash utility. Problem in every case turned out to be stuck bits in the SPI ROM that the EZ-Flash utility didn't detect, which resulted in a bricked board. I've since fallen back to DOS flashing from a Hirens USB stick, and I'll do it twice before rebooting to be absolutely sure.

I've had to buy a SPI flasher to fix the bricked boards, and in most cases had to desolder the SPI ROM because the board would drag the bus down and keep the chip from being able to be programmed.
 

ChosenUno

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
1,313
I've always just stuck with whatever method's recommended by the OEM, sometimes it's flash in BIOS, others it's a Windows utility. Haven't bricked anything yet.
 
Top