Possible solution to random restarts, kernel power errors, boot loops etc.

Nielo TM

Gawd
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
986
Short version: If you experience random restart, power loss, kernel power errors, system stuck in boot loop etc, check the case connectors (including power and reset) first. I was experiencing all of the above and even ended up replaced the PSU, CPU, motherboard and SSD with no avail. The cause of the problem turned out to be faulty reset button on my Corsair Carbide Spec 03 case. Simply unplugging the reset connector from the motherboard instantly solved the issue. So before you start panicking or replacing components, check the case connectors first (inc hubs). May save yourself a lot of trouble, money and time.


Long version: Slightly over a week ago, my less than a year old Ryzen build restarted for no reason. The only error code I got was Kernel Power 41. 5 days ago it happened again. 2 minutes after, the same thing. But this time, PC was stuck in boot loop. As usual, I went through the process of removing the RAM, swapping out the GPU etc without success. Googling reviled the problem could be caused by faulty CPU, Mobo or PSU. I even came across a user with the exact issue and his solution was replacing the CPU. Frustrated of not getting anywhere, I ordered the replacement components from Amazon. Kept the PSU to the same make and model (Seasonic Focus 850), but choses the successors to the X370 Strix and 1800X (X470 Strix and 2700X). Even ordered a new SSD for good measure. To be fair, I just wanted to upgrade from 240GB to 1TB.

By Saturday components arrived and I rebuilt the system. Plugged it in and success! Everything ran as normal. Then it randomly rebooted again soon after I finished installing Windows. I dismissed it as possible driver issue. But the lack of error code should have given me a hint. Anyway, I continued with the setup and ran Prime95 and Superposition Unigine simultaneously overnight for good measure. Woke up to find the system still running. Relieved that replacing the components solved the problem, I shut the system. When I turned it back on in the afternoon, everything that happened initially, happened again and in the exact order. For a minute, I couldn’t believe what was happening; and started to wonder if the replacement components are faulty as well.

Confused, frustrated, irritated and angry, I started to focus on other components. Started removing the power and SATA connectors off the other two HDDs and BD drive. No avail. Unplugged the PC from the UPS and plugged it straight into the wall. No avail. All that was left are case connectors. So I removed the front audio and USB hub. No avail. Then for some reason, I decided to remove the reset connector from the motherboard and voila, it worked! Plugged the connect back in and the PC went back to looping. At this moment, all I could do was giggle. All that money (most of which I’ll get back), time and stress and all I had to do is yank a simple connector out.

Hopefully this will help some poor soul out. I know this is rare and I certainly never experienced something like this before (or even heard of it), but I sure learned my lesson. Even faulty buttons can be a pain!

Have a good Christmas
 

cdoublejj

Gawd
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
608
that's why when we get weird jobs in like that we "bread board it" remove all the guts from the case and run it all on the bench sans case. still happens to best of us thought. i can tell of some "DOH" moments iv'e had.
 

cdoublejj

Gawd
Joined
Apr 12, 2013
Messages
608
well for what it's worth, I can tell you from experience that power supplies work way better when actually plugged in to the wall.
 
D

Deleted member 88227

Guest
well for what it's worth, I can tell you from experience that power supplies work way better when actually plugged in to the wall.

He unplugged it from a UPS and then plugged it directly into the wall. Illuminating the possibility that the UPS was bad.
 

tedych

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jan 18, 2013
Messages
372
well for what it's worth, I can tell you from experience that power supplies work way better when actually plugged in to the wall.
While this may be true for some UPSes (mostly cheap stepped "sinewave"), it can't be generalized that way.
A good sinewave UPS can (will) protect you from all the bad things happening in the mains socket. And nearby devices like air-conditioners, other PCs or any inductive/capacitive/motor device induces all kind of bad stuff in the mains.
A good online UPS will make your PSU grateful :) .
 

Nielo TM

Gawd
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
986
Mine is connected to a moderately expensive stepped (approx) sinwave APC UPS. It does work with my Seasonic Focus 850 along with my monitor, PS4, X1 etc. Heck, it saved my PC from several power outages, dips, brown outs etc. It was unlikely the cause but just wanted to eliminate the possibility.
 
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