Partition size for Win7 ultimate

Discussion in 'Operating Systems' started by gman76, Feb 4, 2010.

  1. gman76

    gman76 n00b

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    I currently run WinXP from a C partition that is 15GB in size (D uses the rest of the 640GB drive). I'd like to do a clean install of Win7 Ultimate in the C partition. Can it be done, do you think there's enough room? Are there any options to choose NOT to install items (to save space) during the install? Will I risk corrupting the D drive which has all my data (personal data, music & videos)?
     
  2. DeaconFrost

    DeaconFrost [H]ardForum Junkie

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    15 GB is below "safe" specs for even XP. I can't imagine wanting to confine myself to such a small OS partition. In your situation, the argument to install apps on a second partition absolutely falls apart because you are using the same physical disk. That argument is useless anyway, but I digress.

    Like I said, I couldn't imagine confining my system that much. if I had to use a single 640 GB drive, I'd make my system partition 100 GB, and leave the rest for data.
     
  3. NoForgiveness

    NoForgiveness Gawd

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    Windows 7 system requirements:

    16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)
     
  4. gman76

    gman76 n00b

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    OK, so can I install Win7 (no other apps) and get into the disk management tools to reallocate some of my free space on the D drive to make the C drive bigger?
     
  5. Sovereign

    Sovereign 2[H]4U

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    No. You need to make the C: partition larger prior to installing Windows 7.
     
  6. gman76

    gman76 n00b

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    Why 100GB? Seems like a lot of wasted space for me. The only other disk-consuming apps will be MS Office. So, 25GB should be more than enough - right? Or am I missing something?
     
  7. DeaconFrost

    DeaconFrost [H]ardForum Junkie

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    I still follow the rule of allowing all kinds of free space for temp files and such. With hard drive space so cheap, why restrict yourself? Hell, if this isn't a laptop, why only run one drive? I am currently using a 320 GB drive, formatted as one solid partition for my C Drive, and a single 640 GB as my D drive.

    If you aren't installing any games, and the largest app you plan to install is Office, you could probably get away with something along the lines of a 30 GB, but even then I'd feel like I was cramped. On my work laptop, I have a 40 GB system volume, which doesn't get any larger apps than Office.
     
  8. gman76

    gman76 n00b

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    Yes, I realize that would be best, but I want to avoid touching the data on the D drive. Seems that people are reporting Win7 takes up ~10GB of space after a fresh install, which will allow me to do the reallocation of the C drive. Maybe that "10GB" is for a x32 Home version. IDK.
     
  9. DeaconFrost

    DeaconFrost [H]ardForum Junkie

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    If the data is that important to you, then you should back it up before hand just in case. If you don't have a way of backing it up, then you'll just have to take your chances (and it probably isn't that important to you). Anytime you resize a partition, you want to have the data backed up.

    If it was me, I'd clear the entire drive, and start with a blank, unformatted drive when installing Windows 7. Then, during the install, I'd create my system volume, and then handle the D partition once Windows was installed.
     
  10. Shockey

    Shockey [H]ard|Gawd

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    I just recently did a install of windows 7. It claims it requires 12 to 13gb to install. Windows 7 also has a feature where if you override your old operating system it move all your files to a folder called windows.old in your C: drive. So you can install over the top of your old operating system and still have your old files to move to windows 7 ;) Without having to re-size your partition or jump through hops

    Just don't delete the partition!!!!!

    EDIT, During setting up windows 7 to install. Choose custom and it will show you the partition on your hard drives. Select the partition and it will tell you weather it big enough or not to install windows 7 on.
     
  11. ameoba

    ameoba [H]ardness Supreme

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    Point of reference - C:\Windows on the Dell I just got at work (2 days ago) is over 12GB. That doesn't include any temp files used when installing.

    Maybe, while you're upgrading your OS, it'd be a good time to invest in an SSD to put the OS on ;)
     
  12. JaguarSKX

    JaguarSKX [H]ard|Gawd

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    I installed a trial 30 day Windows 7 Home Premium on my PC last week. Right after installation, Win 7 took about 16GB or 17GB. I deleted all temp files and moved the Page file to a different physical hard drive. After that minor clean up Win 7's footprint was about 12GB.

    My C:\ drive is 40GB. I generally install all games onto a separate physical hard drive or partition. It makes backing up the C:\ drive easier and makes the backup file smaller.