Original os is on old hdd how do fresh install to new,hdd

Discussion in 'SSDs & Data Storage' started by Cylocybin, Jun 9, 2018.

  1. Cylocybin

    Cylocybin n00bie

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    Copy of windows 10 is on hdd how do i access it it to install windows to new hdd or do i need to buy win10 again
     
  2. SvenBent

    SvenBent 2[H]4U

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    remove any hdd you dont want to install windows on
    boot on install media
    install windows

    Reconnect the drives.
     
  3. Cylocybin

    Cylocybin n00bie

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    I dont understand.

    I have one hardrive from dell with Windows 10 on it how do i get windows 10 on a new drive if i didnt wamt to clone the entire original drive
     
  4. Denpepe

    Denpepe Gawd

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    The windows 10 license is tied to the motherboard, if you install it on a new HDD or SSD it will autoactivate the first time you run it after the install. Just skip the entering of the code during the install (there is an option to do so).
     
  5. IceDigger

    IceDigger [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Download the windows 10 iso and put it to cd or usb stick.

    Put new hdd/sdd in computer.
     
  6. Spartacus09

    Spartacus09 [H]Lite

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    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10

    In case you don't have windows 10 disk already, should work for pro and home versions to create the media on a dvd or flash drive.
    Then as mentioned remove the old drive put in the new drive and boot to the disk/flash drive and install to the new drive.
     
  7. Spartacus09

    Spartacus09 [H]Lite

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    As a side note, make sure to run magic jelly bean or a similar to ensure you pull any product keys if you have office or the like that you need to reinstall.
     
  8. Cylocybin

    Cylocybin n00bie

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  9. westrock2000

    westrock2000 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    If it's purely a new harddrive (even a spinner to SSD), you can use easUS Todo Backup Free. It will make a bootable USB stick that you load onto. Tell it to clone the old disk to the new disk. Turn off the computer. Remove old drive. Power up and boot into Windows like nothing ever happened. And you still have the old drive totally untouched in case something did happen.

    2 tips.

    If the new drive is same size or slightly smaller than old drive (like going from a 320GB spinner to a 256GB SSD), then you need to open Computer Management -> Disk Management in Windows (type computer management in the search bar). Shrink the volume of the old harddrive to smaller then the new drive. You may need to "defragment" the drive first before you do this, as Windows will not shrink the volume lower then data written furthest out.

    If the new drive is larger than the older drive. Once it's cloned, you can boot into Windows. You will now have unallocated space on the drive as seen in Computer Management -> Disk Management. If you had a 250GB drive and upgraded to a 480GB drive, you will now have 230GB of unallocated space on the new drive. Right click the active partition on the drive and select expand volume. This will let you expand to include the new space.
     
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  10. Cylocybin

    Cylocybin n00bie

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    thank you for that its going to come in handy when i upgrade
     
  11. Formula.350

    Formula.350 Gawd

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    You can use Macrium Reflect (free for home use) to do it also, but from within Windows. The Reflect software will create a Shadow Copy (which makes copies of all in-use files as well, it's how Restore Points are made), and clone it from within Windows. Which I like as it removes multiple steps, like having to boot from some other media, along with having to create said media.

    That's what I used last week in my HDD to nVME m.2 SSD clone.
    I had a couple of stumbles while getting started but it only took ~20mins to clone 130GB off a SATA II (albeit 10K RPM) drive.

    If you do opt to use Reflect (or for anyone else reading this who does), my personal tips are:
    #1 - When you install the SSD, if it's not already been initialized/formatted/etc... to Initialize it in the same Disk Management built into Windows that westrock2000 detailed above (also accessible by right-clicking on "Computer" if you have that icon enabled on your desktop), and when you get there it should automatically prompt you to Initialize it. It should ask if you want MBR (Master Boot Record) or GPT (GUID Partition Table), and pick MBR if you're cloning a Windows Boot drive. (Note: In my experience, this doesn't seem to matter as I'm pretty sure Reflect will change it to match the target drive's configuration that you're cloning.)

    #2 - When you're in Reflect, click the drive you want to clone and that box will expand slightly with two options, one of them being something like "Create a Backup"; click that. A new window will open with the "Target Drive" (the one you want to clone from) and a blank box beneath it. Click the button to sellect the drive you want to clone the data to. It will now occupy that empty box. THIS PART IS KEY (at least it was for me)... If this drive shows any partitions currently on it, you will need to delete them (mine had a small 128MB leading partition which upon first cloning, prevented booting from it). Now drag the partition(s) from the Target drive onto this blank drive. Doing so will now allow for an option to show up to "Configure partition"; click this and a new window will open. In that, change the drive letter to C: (yes, your current one is already C:, it's OK!) and any other details you may want. Accept those settings which closes that window, then click on "Next" to proceed with the cloning. A progress window will open and say what is happening along with a progress bar. Again, mine took roughly 20mins, whether it's faster or slower will depend on how much data you're copying and no doubt both drive's performance.

    #3 - When it finishes, your cloned drive will change its drive letter and your "new" Windows drive will now become C: (windows may Open these automatically, just close them).
    Shut down your computer. Disconnect your old drive if you don't plan to use it anymore, power on, and enter your BIOS. Change the Boot order to now have your new drive first in the list. Save and voila. Windows will load, and then in the background automatically authenticate your key. NOTE: If you have the Windows Update Service (wuauserv) disabled, then it won't be able to authenticate and you'll get the "Please Authenticate Your Copy of Windows" watermark.
    -OR-
    Shift+Click the Power button in Start Menu to access the advanced options and restart right to the BIOS (I believe it's via the Troubleshooting menu), then go about changing your boot order. Save BIOS changes. Once saved you can shutdown (hold power button), and disconnect the old drive. It's not necessary to remove the drive, but if you don't plan to use it, it doesn't need to be connected. BUT if you plan to use it and are going to format it to use as storage, then leave it in. Again, same "windows update" disclaimer applies.


    This was my first time using any cloning software, and beyond the first attempt not working due to the aforementioned tiny partition which was created when I originally set it to GPT and let Windows format the drive, it went well. Was a lot easier than I thought it would be :p
    Oh one last tip: Reflect, being primarily a backup program, will have installed a service and program in the Startup section (can view it in Task Manager), so if you are "done" with the program after cloning then I'd uninstall it. (Since you cloned the drive after installing Reflect, the install will be present on the new drive.)
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
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  12. Cylocybin

    Cylocybin n00bie

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    Thank you for more information. Still waiting for my drive to arrive! Cant wait!