OnePlus 5T

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[H]ard|Gawd
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Feb 21, 2005
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Using the modded GCam moves the OP5 (and presumably 5T as well) from poor to acceptable anyway. It's less a hardware issue and more a software one.
 

Tup3x

[H]ard|Gawd
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Last edited:

radeon962

[H]ard|Gawd
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CNet editor doesn't think the Camera is too bad. Just one person but still, it's not a dumpster fire or anything.

https://www.cnet.com/news/oneplus-5t-sells-nov-21-499-face-unlock-dual-cameras/

It never has been. Camera's on Oneplus phones have been good just not great. It all depends what you need.

If your phone is your primary camera for things like your kids sporting events, vacations, work, etc. don't expect flagship level (Google, Apple, Samsung) pics.

If camera is not high on your list OnePlus 5/5T is a great phone for the price.
 

radeon962

[H]ard|Gawd
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The Verge has a nice review/summary of the OnePlus 5T which I would have to agree with based on owning all of the past OnePlus phones from the One up through and including the 5.


Great hardware. Average or better camera. Good software. Questionable updates and support.


If you are comfortable rooting and flashing your phone a OnePlus phone is a great option.


If you just want to setup and use your phone, get regular updates and just have your device work with few issues then you might want to look to other OEM's with better policies regarding support and/or updates.


From the Verge:


https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/201...-combination-of-specs-design-and-price/?amp=1


OnePlus' device support outlook


OnePlus' Android update policy hasn't really changed from the OnePlus 5, which is to say, there is no official update policy. Even after asking OnePlus, we were told there's no promise of monthly updates, and there's no designated "x years of support" window. OnePlus reps we spoke to would only say to look at what the company has done in the past.


So, let's do that: OnePlus supported the OnePlus 2 with major updates for less than one year. The device, released in August 2015, did not get an update to Android 7.0 Nougat, which was released in August 2016. OnePlus does still ship quarterly security updates for the Android 6.0 device, though, with the most recent one arriving in October.


Things seem a little better for the OnePlus 3 and 3T, which got an official upgrade to Oreo over the weekend. There's no telling how long OnePlus will support the 3 and 3T, but so far the support window seems longer than the OnePlus 2. OnePlus told us the 5 and 5T will have an Oreo beta by the end of the year and a final release by Q1 2018.


The OnePlus 5, 3T, and 3 have been getting new updates several times a month, which usually arrive in the latest security update. Sometimes these are about a month late, and other times they are on time with the more security-conscious OEMs. OnePlus also seems to go out of its way to ship fixes for high-profile vulnerabilities, like when it shipped the KRACK WPA2 vulnerability in October (making it one of the first OEMs to patch it). OnePlus posts every update release on its website for each device, making update history and release notes very easy to track.


While OnePlus makes great hardware and software at a great price, the company often seems determined to shoot itself in the foot with software oversights or anti-consumer moves that generate terrible PR. This month, for instance, it left an engineering APK in its production software that contained a root backdoor. Last month, it was caught collecting personally identifiable analytics data (like phone numbers!) without informing users or asking them if they want to opt in. Earlier this year, the company sent push ads to customers.


At the end of its various controversies, OnePlus usually does the right thing. It is issuing an update to remove the engineering APK, it's deleting analytics data and updating phones to requiring an opt in, and it's allowing users to block the push ads. But why does the company keep doing these things in the first place? OnePlus' continual stream of stupid blunders and lack of concrete update promises makes it hard to trust the company. Right now it feels like OnePlus could do something bad to your software or drop support for the device at any time. So I'll say the same thing I said with the OnePlus 5: the best thing OnePlus can do to improve the outlook of this phone is immediately announce a standard update program with timely monthly updates and two years of major update support.


xes for high-profile vulnerabilities, like when it shipped the KRACK WPA2 vulnerability in October (making it one of the first OEMs to patch it). OnePlus posts every update release on its website for each device, making update history and release notes very easy to track.


While OnePlus makes great hardware and software at a great price, the company often seems determined to shoot itself in the foot with software oversights or anti-consumer moves that generate terrible PR. This month, for instance, it left an engineering APK in its production software that contained a root backdoor. Last month, it was caught collecting personally identifiable analytics data (like phone numbers!) without informing users or asking them if they want to opt in. Earlier this year, the company sent push ads to customers.


At the end of its various controversies, OnePlus usually does the right thing. It is issuing an update to remove the engineering APK, it's deleting analytics data and updating phones to requiring an opt in, and it's allowing users to block the push ads. But why does the company keep doing these things in the first place? OnePlus' continual stream of stupid blunders and lack of concrete update promises makes it hard to trust the company. Right now it feels like OnePlus could do something bad to your software or drop support for the device at any time. So I'll say the same thing I said with the OnePlus 5: the best thing OnePlus can do to improve the outlook of this phone is immediately announce a standard update program with timely monthly updates and two years of major update support.
 

CHANG3D

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jul 23, 2010
Messages
4,942
The Verge has a nice review/summary of the OnePlus 5T which I would have to agree with based on owning all of the past OnePlus phones from the One up through and including the 5.


Great hardware. Average or better camera. Good software. Questionable updates and support.


If you are comfortable rooting and flashing your phone a OnePlus phone is a great option.


If you just want to setup and use your phone, get regular updates and just have your device work with few issues then you might want to look to other OEM's with better policies regarding support and/or updates.


From the Verge:


https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/201...-combination-of-specs-design-and-price/?amp=1


OnePlus' device support outlook


OnePlus' Android update policy hasn't really changed from the OnePlus 5, which is to say, there is no official update policy. Even after asking OnePlus, we were told there's no promise of monthly updates, and there's no designated "x years of support" window. OnePlus reps we spoke to would only say to look at what the company has done in the past.


So, let's do that: OnePlus supported the OnePlus 2 with major updates for less than one year. The device, released in August 2015, did not get an update to Android 7.0 Nougat, which was released in August 2016. OnePlus does still ship quarterly security updates for the Android 6.0 device, though, with the most recent one arriving in October.


Things seem a little better for the OnePlus 3 and 3T, which got an official upgrade to Oreo over the weekend. There's no telling how long OnePlus will support the 3 and 3T, but so far the support window seems longer than the OnePlus 2. OnePlus told us the 5 and 5T will have an Oreo beta by the end of the year and a final release by Q1 2018.


The OnePlus 5, 3T, and 3 have been getting new updates several times a month, which usually arrive in the latest security update. Sometimes these are about a month late, and other times they are on time with the more security-conscious OEMs. OnePlus also seems to go out of its way to ship fixes for high-profile vulnerabilities, like when it shipped the KRACK WPA2 vulnerability in October (making it one of the first OEMs to patch it). OnePlus posts every update release on its website for each device, making update history and release notes very easy to track.


While OnePlus makes great hardware and software at a great price, the company often seems determined to shoot itself in the foot with software oversights or anti-consumer moves that generate terrible PR. This month, for instance, it left an engineering APK in its production software that contained a root backdoor. Last month, it was caught collecting personally identifiable analytics data (like phone numbers!) without informing users or asking them if they want to opt in. Earlier this year, the company sent push ads to customers.


At the end of its various controversies, OnePlus usually does the right thing. It is issuing an update to remove the engineering APK, it's deleting analytics data and updating phones to requiring an opt in, and it's allowing users to block the push ads. But why does the company keep doing these things in the first place? OnePlus' continual stream of stupid blunders and lack of concrete update promises makes it hard to trust the company. Right now it feels like OnePlus could do something bad to your software or drop support for the device at any time. So I'll say the same thing I said with the OnePlus 5: the best thing OnePlus can do to improve the outlook of this phone is immediately announce a standard update program with timely monthly updates and two years of major update support.


xes for high-profile vulnerabilities, like when it shipped the KRACK WPA2 vulnerability in October (making it one of the first OEMs to patch it). OnePlus posts every update release on its website for each device, making update history and release notes very easy to track.


While OnePlus makes great hardware and software at a great price, the company often seems determined to shoot itself in the foot with software oversights or anti-consumer moves that generate terrible PR. This month, for instance, it left an engineering APK in its production software that contained a root backdoor. Last month, it was caught collecting personally identifiable analytics data (like phone numbers!) without informing users or asking them if they want to opt in. Earlier this year, the company sent push ads to customers.


At the end of its various controversies, OnePlus usually does the right thing. It is issuing an update to remove the engineering APK, it's deleting analytics data and updating phones to requiring an opt in, and it's allowing users to block the push ads. But why does the company keep doing these things in the first place? OnePlus' continual stream of stupid blunders and lack of concrete update promises makes it hard to trust the company. Right now it feels like OnePlus could do something bad to your software or drop support for the device at any time. So I'll say the same thing I said with the OnePlus 5: the best thing OnePlus can do to improve the outlook of this phone is immediately announce a standard update program with timely monthly updates and two years of major update support.
great analysis
 

radeon962

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 13, 2008
Messages
1,268
Sounding more and more like every OnePlus phone that has come out with each new review.


Once the 5T hits the wild, most reviews will inevitably start with its a great phone for the price or something along those line.


Verdict

A superb display in a trendy aspect ratio, excellent battery life, and fluid Android experience - is that enough to make up for an unimpressive camera performance and the lack of a few key flagship features? That would have been an easy answer if big-name phones hadn't gotten so expensive this year. If one of the pillars of a great smartphone collapses, the whole thing goes to pieces, right? Wrong - the OP5T has the price to prop it up. Value for money is the game, and OnePlus knows how to play it, and it's going strong with the 5T.


I've heard this type of summary before with the 5 and 3T/3 before it.


The rest of the review is here:


https://m.gsmarena.com/oneplus_5t-review-1687p9.php


From the summary on their camera review:


Photo quality is okay, but not up to flagship standard. Colors and contrast are good, but the detail and dynamic range are less so. In low light there's a minor improvement over the OP5, but not enough to justify sacrificing the 'telephoto' camera. As it stands, the secondary camera on the 5T doesn't have much uses beyond helping witth portraits with defocused background.
 

exlink

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Dec 16, 2006
Messages
5,955
For a $500 phone I think its pretty solid to be honest. Constantly see people saying the camera isn't up to "flagship standards," but this is a $500 phone...not a ~$900+ phone like most flagships today. Reviewing the photos myself, I think they look good and better than what I'd expect out of a phone in this price bracket. Obviously not up to Pixel 2 or iPhone 8/X standards, but again, I wouldn't complain at this price. The rest of the phone seems to easily match or even beat flagships which is impressive.

Now if only they could officially layout an upgrade plan then I'd be all over the phone. But from their past it sounds like that will be very unlikely.
 

Aurelius

2[H]4U
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Mar 22, 2003
Messages
3,471
It's always funny how people expect OnePlus phones to be virtually as good as the best flagship phones for half the price. Like those people who buy the $700 4K TV because they heard it has good quality for the money, but somehow thought that meant it was as good as a $2,000 OLED set.

No, even with the OPO the goal was more to get close enough to the highest-end phones at a significantly lower price. If you don't demand Pixel 2-quality photos or the highest resolution screen you can get, a OnePlus 5T will hit almost all of the marks: tall screen, dual cameras (albeit not with zoom), a modern processor and lots of storage. If I wanted a big-screen Android phone and couldn't swallow the cost of a Pixel 2 XL, I'd be all over this.
 

Mad Maxx

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It's always funny how people expect OnePlus phones to be virtually as good as the best flagship phones for half the price. Like those people who buy the $700 4K TV because they heard it has good quality for the money, but somehow thought that meant it was as good as a $2,000 OLED set.

No, even with the OPO the goal was more to get close enough to the highest-end phones at a significantly lower price. If you don't demand Pixel 2-quality photos or the highest resolution screen you can get, a OnePlus 5T will hit almost all of the marks: tall screen, dual cameras (albeit not with zoom), a modern processor and lots of storage. If I wanted a big-screen Android phone and couldn't swallow the cost of a Pixel 2 XL, I'd be all over this.
This is me. A phone is primarily my main communications and portable computing tool. Camera is about the 5th or 6th most important thing to me. All I care is that it takes decent snapshots.
 

Tup3x

[H]ard|Gawd
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Messages
1,893
I've been thinking a bit... I still really like my Honor 8 and OP5T's camera would be downgrade (judging by the picks that I've seen). This has slightly better form factor too and pentile matrix at that size is a bit on the edge. It's still snappy and I can't complain about the battery life.

I'll wait for Huawei P11 and Honor 10.
 

Moonjock

Limp Gawd
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Nov 24, 2008
Messages
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So far I'm getting great battery life (more than one day and 6plus hour of OST), don't us my phone camera much
 
Joined
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So far I'm getting great battery life (more than one day and 6plus hour of OST), don't us my phone camera much

Yeah the battery life is awesome...but I don't feel like the phone was a substantial upgrade from my OnePlus 3T...and probably shouldn't have bought it.
 

Mad Maxx

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Yeah the battery life is awesome...but I don't feel like the phone was a substantial upgrade from my OnePlus 3T...and probably shouldn't have bought it.
I'm sticking with my 5, though the bigger screen looks nice. How do you like the rear sensor compared to the front? I'm not a big fan of putting the sensor on the back.
 
Joined
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I'm sticking with my 5, though the bigger screen looks nice. How do you like the rear sensor compared to the front? I'm not a big fan of putting the sensor on the back.

It's very responsive..I do both a left index finger and a right index finger signature and I haven't had any issue with fishing for it to unlock while picking it up. I really don't think the screen is that much bigger than the 3T though, I guess I thought it would seem much bigger.
 
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