NOt sure where, deals with power management

kinson

Gawd
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Nov 14, 2005
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772
I would like to know if it's possible to set your computer up to go into a sleep, hibernate, or standby mode where the nic stays connected to the internet. At least with vista as it's what I have.

I guess the best way to describe it (this is just an example), would be to keep your computer downloading files all night while in the lowest power state. Killing lights and any other source of power consumption except for the dire necessities for hdd writing, cpu, and nic usage...
 

Nenu

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You cannot download while sleeping, hibernating or in standby.
The definition of those terms explains why.

Best thing you can do with current hardware is turn the display off after a short time and power hard drives down after a few minutes when not in use.
(using control panel / BIOS power options).

You might want to consider getting a low power PC (mini ITX or similar) to download over night.
They consume around 20 to 80W depending what you buy.
 

kinson

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Nov 14, 2005
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772
If I had tons of money that would be a killer idea...

I wasn't sure if it was possible or not, I liked the idea of it working though because my room gets hot as hell with a full tower pc steaming along lol

And vista has a hybrid sleep mode, I've read about all of them, but I've also seen options that are suppose to keep certain things from turning off... Owell... Just hack an old xbox and put linux on it hehe
 

Electrofreak

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AMD had a power-saving application you could install a few years back. It automatically downclocked the processor and reduced fan speed when the CPU was under low loads.

I wonder if it'd still work, I think I'd tried it on a socket 754 AMD 64 3200+

EDIT - AMD Cool 'n Quiet, that's what it was called, I just remembered.
 

Nenu

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AMD had a power-saving application you could install a few years back. It automatically downclocked the processor and reduced fan speed when the CPU was under low loads.

I wonder if it'd still work, I think I'd tried it on a socket 754 AMD 64 3200+

EDIT - AMD Cool 'n Quiet, that's what it was called, I just remembered.
Thats part of standard power saving features these days.
 

Electrofreak

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Just a note, back when I was using Cool 'n Quiet, I was also running a reasonable OC. Basically all Cool 'n Quiet does is reduce the CPU multiplier when the CPU was under low load and the system was in a power-saving scheme. IIRC it did not function when you had the PC in the "Always On" power setting, only in "Minimal Power Saving" or some such.

It didn't adjust your FSB speed or voltages, and so it wouldn't be adjusting your overclock. If you had an unlocked mutiplier, (I did not,) it might be a concern, but I suspect it wouldn't cause any problems. Even if it were to, you could just switch the Always On power scheme and C'nQ would be disabled.

I suppose it's a moot point given the fact that it's integrated into recent generations of processors. I can't see it being detrimental to overclocking if we're still here, turning up the heat on our processors as we strive for more clock cycles.

Honestly, when it comes down to it, the majority of heat that a system produces is via the power supply. Yeah, the graphics card(s), CPU, and RAM produce a reasonable amount of heat, but if you put your hand behind your system and compare the heat coming out of your exhaust fans to the heat coming out of your power supply, you should notice a significant difference.

If you want significantly less heat output from your machine while allowing it to continue to run, you'll need a smaller, cooler power supply. Of course, you run the risk of coming up short in necessary wattage if you put it under any real load, and power supplies that hover near their load limits will have a tendency to produce voltage fluctuations (not good for your hardware, especially if it's overclocked) and experience failures (particularly if they don't have a good cooling solution).

Honestly, your best bet is to take an old, cheap, budget PC, (or a laptop), hook it up to your network, get file sharing set up with your tower case, and have it do your downloading for you while you shut down the tower for the night.

IMHO.
 
Last edited:

Remote

Weaksauce
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May 31, 2009
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You can download data on a 360 while the machine is turned off in standby mode so it should be possible to do on a PC too. The only reason it isn't is because no one has bothered to make it be able to do so.
 

kinson

Gawd
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Nov 14, 2005
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772
lol... Yeah I see the whole "conflict" here but I just don't care enough to not overclock :p

and yeah, remote, I agree... I wish it could do it...
 

Nenu

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...Honestly, when it comes down to it, the majority of heat that a system produces is via the power supply. Yeah, the graphics card(s), CPU, and RAM produce a reasonable amount of heat, but if you put your hand behind your system and compare the heat coming out of your exhaust fans to the heat coming out of your power supply, you should notice a significant difference.

If you want significantly less heat output from your machine while allowing it to continue to run, you'll need a smaller, cooler power supply. Of course, you run the risk of coming up short in necessary wattage if you put it under any real load, and power supplies that hover near their load limits will have a tendency to produce voltage fluctuations (not good for your hardware, especially if it's overclocked) and experience failures (particularly if they don't have a good cooling solution).
This is false and you can kill your hardware following this advice.
 

Nenu

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You can download data on a 360 while the machine is turned off in standby mode so it should be possible to do on a PC too. The only reason it isn't is because no one has bothered to make it be able to do so.
You need to find out what the 360's standby mode does before saying the same can be achieved on a PC.
Clearly not everything is in standby or it wouldnt function at all.
Can you qualify this statement:
The only reason it isn't is because no one has bothered to make it be able to do so.
?
 
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