Newly Revealed Flaw Could Subject IoT Devices to Airborne Attacks

DooKey

[H]F Junkie
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Billions of voice-activated Internet of Things devices may be subject to external attack due to BlueBorne vulnerabilities, Armis revealed last Wednesday. Hackers could exploit BlueBorne to mount an airborne attack, using Bluetooth to spread malware and access critical data, including sensitive personal information. Sounds like this might be a bad vulnerability that a lot of companies are going to need to fix. At least Google and Amazon have already patched for it.

The BlueBorne vulnerabilities could allow a man-in-the-middle attack, which would enable hackers to access personal data even if users don't visit any malicious sites, download any suspicious file attachments, or take any other direct action to enable it.
 
D

Deleted member 93354

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Billions of voice-activated Internet of Things devices may be subject to external attack due to BlueBorne vulnerabilities, Armis revealed last Wednesday. Hackers could exploit BlueBorne to mount an airborne attack, using Bluetooth to spread malware and access critical data, including sensitive personal information. Sounds like this might be a bad vulnerability that a lot of companies are going to need to fix. At least Google and Amazon have already patched for it.

The BlueBorne vulnerabilities could allow a man-in-the-middle attack, which would enable hackers to access personal data even if users don't visit any malicious sites, download any suspicious file attachments, or take any other direct action to enable it.

Blue tooth is a low power protocol. You would have to be close to carry out the attack. It's only about 60 feet in the best of conditions. I can get WiFi to go a couple hundred feet with a directed antenna without violating fcc regs.
 

jardows

[H]ard|Gawd
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Jun 10, 2015
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Blue tooth is a low power protocol. You would have to be close to carry out the attack. It's only about 60 feet in the best of conditions. I can get WiFi to go a couple hundred feet with a directed antenna without violating fcc regs.
This is probably a bigger concern for corporations, who will have less control over who is coming into near range than an individual. Of course, 60 feet would be enough for a door-to-door salesman to infect your home.
 
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