New ip scheme

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by Ken217a, Oct 28, 2011.

  1. Ken217a

    Ken217a n00b

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    At our company right now, we are using the 192.168.1.x/24 for our network. We are going to bring in Voip, and want to expand from 254 to a little over 1,000 addresses. How is the best way to do this. I did see that I can change the subnet mask to 255.255.252.0. or 255.255.248.0. Would I then need to change the ip address from 192.168.1.x to something else?
     
  2. aggiec05

    aggiec05 Limp Gawd

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    What is your backend network infrastructure?

    I would suggest creating a new subnet for the VOIP traffic, you will want QOS implemented anyways with it. You could make VOIP 192.168.10.X/24.
     
  3. Ken217a

    Ken217a n00b

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    So, we can make say 4 vlan's and the addresses would be 192.168.10.x/24, 192.168.1.20.x/24, 192.168.30.x/24, and 192.168.40.x/24? We could put all of the VoIP in 192.168.10.x/24, internal networking on 192.168.20.x/24, wireless (no access to network) on 192.168.30.x/24, and Wireless on network on 192.168.40.x/24?
     
  4. Jay_2

    Jay_2 2[H]4U

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    Yes that's how I do it anyway and done a couple of VoIP installs now.
     
  5. aggiec05

    aggiec05 Limp Gawd

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    Correct. Only a few reasons to go with a large subnet, adding VOIP I would not see as one of them.
     
  6. aggiec05

    aggiec05 Limp Gawd

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    You don't have to destroy your current setup either. You can add VOIP as a new subnet keeping everything else intact.
     
  7. Ken217a

    Ken217a n00b

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    As of now,our network is 192.168.1.x/24, just keep that for our network, and add the others.
     
  8. squishy

    squishy [H]ard|Gawd

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    Just .02

    I would get rid of 192.168.1.x if at all possible. This is the most common home network since it's the default for many consumer routers.

    Depending on the VPN implementation, you'll run into routing problems with those users.
     
  9. Ken217a

    Ken217a n00b

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    We have few people that VPN into our network, mainly me and my boss (IT)
     
  10. squishy

    squishy [H]ard|Gawd

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    It works because neither of you have a 192.168.1.x network at home. :p

    If one of your employees (think in the future when you have more of them) has that as a network, which is very common, they won't be able to access resources over the VPN that are also on the 192.168.1.x network at your location.

    It's best to get away from using that block before your company grows too large, as it becomes a total PITA to change it when you have lots of devices.

    Either than or you can help the problem employees change their network addressing at home.