Need help T/Shooting; no power to pump during loop fill

Discussion in 'Water Cooling' started by Khephren, Mar 27, 2019.

  1. Khephren

    Khephren n00b

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2018
    I'm trying to finish my new build, but when attempting to fill the cooling loop I have no power to the pump. I'm using an EKWB A240 Radiator Kit and a Seasonic PSU.

    EK supplies an adapter cable with a male 15-pin SATA power plug to a male 3-pin fan header plug. The instructions direct you to use your own 6-pin cable from the PSU to a female SATA power connector. EK also supplies an ATX bridge plug. This allows the pump to be ran from the power supply.

    I need help with a strategic plan to determine if it is the pump or PSU that's faulty or if I've done something wrong.

    My MB came with it's own ATX bridge and I've already substituted it for the EK. I've verified all connections are firmly seated. The PSU is plugged into a strip that powers my old computer, which is running. Seasonic's instructions has a troubleshooting section that suggests toggling the I/O switch with a 0.5 second delay to ensure the unit is reset, which I did. I also tried moving to an adjacent 6-pin connection on the PSU.

    I don't have much electrical knowledge/skills so this may sound stupid. Can I use a simple bulb tester to check the DC out of the PSU (don't think so, but...)? Is there any way to power the pump from a different source (not another computer PSU, which I don't have)?

    I'm not thrilled about the prospect of the gyrations needed to obtain a replacement for one of the components only to discover the other was the faulty one. Hopefully there will be some suggestions. TIA
     
  2. SticKx911

    SticKx911 2[H]4U

    Messages:
    2,103
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Multimeter. Verify you have power. If you don’t have one...plug a fan in, do the fans spin up in the same 3 pin?

    I’ve had multiple pumps I needed to get wet before they would move anything, is the pump situated after the rez and gravity fed?
     
  3. Khephren

    Khephren n00b

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2018
    Duh, can't believe I didn't think of that. This will have to wait till later today though, but thanks much.

    I don't have a multimeter. But my neighbor was an electrician at the nuke plant I worked at, I'm sure he would offer his help (although I damn near electrocuted him once).

    The pump has an integral reservoir on top and I had done an initial fill before hitting the power switch.
     
  4. Hakaba

    Hakaba Gawd

    Messages:
    598
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Well if you have an older system laying around you can swap the Seasonic onto it to see if it works.
     
  5. owcraftsman

    owcraftsman Gawd

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2007
    Best practice testing a water loop use a spare "PSU + Paperclip" google it.
    Never supply power to components other than fans and pump when filling or leak cheching a loop or risk permanent damge.
    I fill and run pump for at least 24 hrs to insure there are no leaks. This might seem like over kill, but it's not. There can be slow leaks and you get rid of air in the lines that can cause a water loop to underperform.
    I even tip the PC from side to side front to back while loop is running to make sure there are no pockets of air trapped in the radiator etc. during thet 24 hour peroid.
    Best practice before installing your permanent PSU is to use the paperclip test before installing it in the case.
    When running your Test PSU w/paperclip it's best to add a decent load like pump several fans and some lights as the pump alone doesn't draw much power and can damage or reduce its efficency during the 24 hr. test.
    I generally put together my complete build then disconnect several devices from the permanent PSU to add to the test PSU specifically for the test makeing the transistion quick and painless when the testing is complete.

     
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