LG HomeBrew Craft Beer Making Machine Is Debuting at CES 2019

cageymaru

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LG has announced the unveiling of its LG HomeBrew craft beer making machine at CES 2019. The easy to use device utilizes single-use capsules to create up to 5 liters of craft beer in 2 weeks. The capsules contain all the malt, yeast, hop oil and flavoring needed to create a batch of craft beer. Users can monitor the status of their beverage creations with an Android or iOS device, as the machine automates the whole procedure from fermentation, carbonation and aging to serving and cleaning. The machine not only makes the entire process foolproof; it even cleans up for itself afterwards. Some of the craft beer recipes that will ship with the machine include hoppy American IPA, golden American Pale Ale, full-bodied English Stout, zesty Belgian-style Witbier and dry Czech Pilsner.

"LG HomeBrew is the culmination of years of home appliance and water purification technologies that we have developed over the decades," said Song Dae-hyun, president of LG Electronics Home Appliance & Air Solution Company. "Homebrewing has grown at an explosive pace but there are still many beer lovers who haven't taken the jump because of the barrier to entry and these are the consumers we think will be attracted to LG HomeBrew."
 
My sister and her husband used to brew beer the old fashioned way for probably a decade. Now they just use a Pico Brew and they are totally satisfied. If I had a bigger kitchen I would probably buy a pico brew as well.
 
looks lame. takes the fun out of brewing.
Preach it!
mash.jpg
 
What I want to see are the metrics that show me using this system by LG will actually SAVE ME MONEY on the long-road to alcoholism....I mean if there is no savings, I can just buy the shit PRE-MADE...amirite? <hic>......
 
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The last picture.. eeh this thing is huge. I'm not so sure it would fit in my kitchen, and i have a giant kitchen.
 
If anyone from here goes to CES and visits the booth to try it, please let us know your thoughts.
 
Seems to simplify the home brewing process, and that will hopefully lead to more people getting away from the King of Cheap Piss Water they've been adver-programmed into thinking is actually of high taste and quality.


/beersnobmode
 
It has it's place for people that don't want to deal with all the equipment involved in traditional brewing. I'd be interested in the quality of the finished beer. Or if the recipes can be modified.
 
My sister and her husband used to brew beer the old fashioned way for probably a decade. Now they just use a Pico Brew and they are totally satisfied. If I had a bigger kitchen I would probably buy a pico brew as well.


i have done it the "old" fashioned way myself. time consuming. but havent done it in years. Will have to check this pico brew thing out. looks interesting.

thanks
 
Speaking of that image, why are the dual ovens right next to the dining room table?

autocad fail.

Although who am i kidding, I bet it's 899.00 USD. I'd rather brew the old fashioned way in my backyard.



For urbanites though, it raises an interesting question. I was trying to explain to a bro from berlin why i think craft beer is taking off so fast in rural america compared to where he lives... and it's yards. We have space. If you live in SF or NYC, where you gonna brew at? The apartment roof maybe if they let you?
 
I have owned the Pico Zymatic and loved the beers it made and easy to do. I recently sold it, so this LG machine looks interesting, but I will have to see more information about it from CES. I need to see how much it will cost and if they are going to expand on the selection of beer styles or if maybe they will have pods from brand name brewers, like the new PIco C systems. I am interested, but it will depend on the cost and exactly what beers can be brewed.
 
I've had several beers from those automated systems and they aren't horrible. Better than when Budweiser decides to make their own "craft" styles, but definitely not as good as anything from a reputable brewery.
They aren't cost effective and the recipes are intentionally designed for someone who thinks Sam Adams Boston Lager is exotic. You're better off just buying those styles made by professionals.

I guess it might be an interesting intro to how beer is made for some folks, but it's not like it's all that difficult. If you have a stock pot you can buy an extract kit and a plastic carboy to brew real beer anywhere with a stove and a closet.
 
single-use capsules to create up to 5 liters of craft beer in 2 weeks. The capsules contain all the malt, yeast, hop oil and flavoring

Fuck that.

When brewing a German style I stick to reinheitsgebot - water, barley, hops and yeast. I'll play a bit more when doing Belgians or the like... but those are the basics.

Good malt, fresh hops, (as in recent, not fresh off the vine) healthy yeast and reasonable temperature control, clean water, and a healthy amount of elbow grease keeping everything clean and sanitized makes great beer.


If you live in SF or NYC, where you gonna brew at? The apartment roof maybe if they let you?

In SF I brewed in the kitchen of my 15th floor studio.

Kinda surprised I never burnt out that stove... Good thing I was renting.

*

Everything (and more) that you need to know about brewing can be viewed at http://howtobrew.com/book/introduction

If anyone is really interested in getting started, PM me. I've been through it, and brew several times a year. (You can only drink so much... I have to throw "come clean out my keezer" parties a couple times a year.)
 
Fuck that.

When brewing a German style I stick to reinheitsgebot - water, barley, hops and yeast.

LOL, as well as sinamar, hop extract, and non-grain adjuncts as long as they're considered to have a historical precedent. ;)
 
Seems to simplify the home brewing process, and that will hopefully lead to more people getting away from the King of Cheap Piss Water they've been adver-programmed into thinking is actually of high taste and quality.


/beersnobmode
Can’t disagree, but I will say that Budweiser’s copper lager isn’t too bad and actually has a little flavor to it.
 
Seems to simplify the home brewing process, and that will hopefully lead to more people getting away from the King of Cheap Piss Water they've been adver-programmed into thinking is actually of high taste and quality.


/beersnobmode

I'd counter that around here nobody drinks the keg of pisswater anymore, but instead pays $16 bucks for 2 beers that taste like they were brewed by a couple of stoned guys with art degrees.........because the beer inside really isn't rocket-science so they pour more energy into making a distinctive *CAN*. The problem is beer snobs......the insufferable beer snobs who refuse to admit they're just alcoholics :)

Or Sour Beers. Or Beers that have been hopped 40 additional times......basically I kind of admire the people who plow-through a case of Natty Light in 2018...at least they're honest about it.
 
Fun fact: Almost all of what Anheuser Busch produces is via high gravity brewing and they use the same lager yeast for almost everything, too. They essentially brew something super potent (and often with heavy fusel alcohol notes). From there they water it down and blend it until the off notes are gone and the flavors and makeup are close to 100% consistent. Beechwood aging doesn't add flavor, but allows them to speed up the lagering process so they can turn lagers around in record time. Their products are mostly bland, but the process is kind of neat from a logistical point of view.
 
This seems like it's for the boring suburbanite guy who makes a good living, and things he can buy his way into being an interesting person. Their press release is laughable, using words like craft and mentioning the ENTIRE FIVE BEERS they offer, which look like a basic bitch starter pack of getting into beer. As a homebrewer I will drink any beer given to me, and while I don't generally like BMCs products or business methods, they make a consistently and technically high quality product, and I can respect that. Pico brew systems, particularly the zymatic, still fit with the spirit of homebrewing, while this is like the Walmart Gaming PCs of homebrewing.
 
Fuck that.

When brewing a German style I stick to reinheitsgebot - water, barley, hops and yeast. I'll play a bit more when doing Belgians or the like... but those are the basics.

Good malt, fresh hops, (as in recent, not fresh off the vine) healthy yeast and reasonable temperature control, clean water, and a healthy amount of elbow grease keeping everything clean and sanitized makes great beer.




In SF I brewed in the kitchen of my 15th floor studio.

Kinda surprised I never burnt out that stove... Good thing I was renting.

*

Everything (and more) that you need to know about brewing can be viewed at http://howtobrew.com/book/introduction

If anyone is really interested in getting started, PM me. I've been through it, and brew several times a year. (You can only drink so much... I have to throw "come clean out my keezer" parties a couple times a year.)

Yikes, how much were you brewing. Everytime we have done it we used 1 or 2 propane turkey fryers, it wouldn't have been possible inside.
 
These have actually been around for a long time. Just depends on how much you want to spend.
 
Yikes, how much were you brewing. Everytime we have done it we used 1 or 2 propane turkey fryers, it wouldn't have been possible inside.

5 gallons is the typical batch size for most homebrewers, but you can go larger (or even smaller if necessary) depending on what environment you're in.
 
LOL, as well as sinamar, hop extract, and non-grain adjuncts as long as they're considered to have a historical precedent. ;)

Nah, I color my beers w/ grain. I'd never use sinamar or hop extract. Adjuncts - candi sugar for a Belgian or lactose for a milk stout are both perfectly acceptable. I enjoy making my own candi sugar and it saves a TON of cash versus buying it.

Yikes, how much were you brewing. Everytime we have done it we used 1 or 2 propane turkey fryers, it wouldn't have been possible inside.

Typically five gallons. I settled on the BIAB method early. It was one of those "luxury" studios with an open kitchen so I had space over the stove to work.

Now that I've space I've friends encouraging me to go pro. I dunno if I want a second job, but I have a farmhouse on a couple of acres with an old store that's perfect for it.
 
Nah, I color my beers w/ grain. I'd never use sinamar or hop extract. Adjuncts - candi sugar for a Belgian or lactose for a milk stout are both perfectly acceptable. I enjoy making my own candi sugar and it saves a TON of cash versus buying it.

Not saying you use them, just saying that they're allowed under the Reinheitsgebot. There are quite a few odd loopholes, although dry hopping was only just admitted 5-6 years ago. Some American expats at Weihenstephan actually pushed for it.
 
Benderbrau if it's an ale, Botweiser if it's a lager.
 
I'd counter that around here nobody drinks the keg of pisswater anymore, but instead pays $16 bucks for 2 beers that taste like they were brewed by a couple of stoned guys with art degrees.........because the beer inside really isn't rocket-science so they pour more energy into making a distinctive *CAN*. The problem is beer snobs......the insufferable beer snobs who refuse to admit they're just alcoholics :)

Or Sour Beers. Or Beers that have been hopped 40 additional times......basically I kind of admire the people who plow-through a case of Natty Light in 2018...at least they're honest about it.

Yeah, I hear ya. Most botique beers (and this included every IPA I've tried) taste like shit. Give me a classic German beer or an American equivalent (like Sam Adams), and I'm a happy camper.
 
This would have had potential 10 years ago. Today though, there are so many really good beers available just about anywhere in the country, there is no financial incentive to brew your own. You have to really love brewing, in which case, you're probably not in the market for a device like this.
 
This is dumb. Home brewers don't want a system that brews beer for you. They want a reasonably priced home autoclave and a UV filtration pack for tap water.
 
Barrier of entry? Making your own beer is really easy. There are kits that make good stuff like Coopers kits, just remember to not use kilo of sugar as adjunct and buy a kilo of drymalt extract instead and keep your fermenting temperatures on cooler side and remember to clean and sanitize your equipment before use. In 3 weeks you have better beer than any bulk lager.

Or if you want to go all-grain a BIAB (Brew in a bag) method is as easy and cheap as it can get. The times of mash-tuns and such complex 3-pot systems and stuff is over for homebrewers. They still do have their place but making high quality beer does not have to be difficult and complex.
 
LG has announced the unveiling of its LG HomeBrew craft beer making machine at CES 2019. The easy to use device utilizes single-use capsules to create up to 5 liters of craft beer in 2 weeks. The capsules contain all the malt, yeast, hop oil and flavoring needed to create a batch of craft beer. Users can monitor the status of their beverage creations with an Android or iOS device, as the machine automates the whole procedure from fermentation, carbonation and aging to serving and cleaning. The machine not only makes the entire process foolproof; it even cleans up for itself afterwards. Some of the craft beer recipes that will ship with the machine include hoppy American IPA, golden American Pale Ale, full-bodied English Stout, zesty Belgian-style Witbier and dry Czech Pilsner.

"LG HomeBrew is the culmination of years of home appliance and water purification technologies that we have developed over the decades," said Song Dae-hyun, president of LG Electronics Home Appliance & Air Solution Company. "Homebrewing has grown at an explosive pace but there are still many beer lovers who haven't taken the jump because of the barrier to entry and these are the consumers we think will be attracted to LG HomeBrew."

Most people interested in something like this drink way more than 5 litres in 2 weeks.
 
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