Leaving Asus for MSI after 22 years.

KazeoHin

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Sep 7, 2011
Messages
8,724
pledging brand loyalty is absurd. Brands leapfrog eachother in quality all the time.

Lets say you have a fantastic company that has quality products and has huge marketshare in your sector.

What do shareholders want? More.

but you already have saturation in your market, and your products are flyling off the shelves, there's nowhere to go. you're at the top.

What do shareholders want? More.

So you start cutting costs. be it QC, product support, admin, who knows. just cut costs so you can widen your margin and give the shareholders more.

What do shareholders want? More.

pretty soon your products are coasting on brand recognition alone. profit margins are high but quality has taken a hit.

now your competitors are one-upping your quality and reviewing higher. word spreads around and now you aren't number one anymore.

Repeat from the top, only now its the competitor's story.



Also each and every publicly traded company would gladly slit your throat with no regrets if it meant a guaranteed 5% increase in their growth. Yes, even {insert your favorite brand here}.
 

xDiVolatilX

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jul 24, 2021
Messages
1,219
I've reviewed probably 200 and something motherboards at this point. I've had a few die on the bench. Two of them were MSI. That's only one more than GIGABYTE or ASUS and less than ASRock. I've also had a couple negative experiences with MSI GPU's. Specifically a 980 Ti and a 2080 Super. MSI's RMA on the 980 Ti was horrible and they not only didn't fix the card after it was sent to them, they damaged the cooling fins.
Interesting. When I rma'd my 2080Ti seahawk ek-x they replaced it with a used refurbished one. it was pretty sad lol.
 

vegeta535

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jul 19, 2013
Messages
9,985
The only GPU that died in a blaze of glory was a MSI GPU. I had 1 X299 MSI board dies and 1 z87 Asus board dies of the dozen or so boards I used. It is a roll of the dice always.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
813
My current AMD build is an MSI board... it has been rock solid, I would not hesitate to buy an MSI board again. Was my first MSI board too since the Athlon XP days (was ASUS and AsRock in-between with Intel).
 

Domingo

Fully [H]
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
21,599
I have a feeling just about all of us have PC parts brands we prefer/trust vs. others. There's nothing wrong with that unless you're blindly buying their stuff and ignoring information that doesn't jive with that opinion. MSI has treated me well and so I usually look at their products first. That doesn't mean I don't look at ASUS, Gigabyte, etc. but it just gives me a starting point. If MSI has a good part that I need, they're going to get my $ unless someone else has something measurably better. If they screw me over, I'll remember that and look elsewhere in much the same way.
There aren't that many large OEM's anymore so it's not that much work to at least glance at some other options. Especially with so many consumer reviews available on YouTube (along with professional reviewers).
 

spine

2[H]4U
Joined
Feb 4, 2003
Messages
2,699
I've never had a problem with Asus anything, but my latest mobo was MSI. Asus just started charging too much for too little.
 

Niner21

Gawd
Joined
Aug 26, 2018
Messages
655
I have a feeling just about all of us have PC parts brands we prefer/trust vs. others. There's nothing wrong with that unless you're blindly buying their stuff and ignoring information that doesn't jive with that opinion.
This. I have used just about every manufacturer out there since the late 90's. I was a pretty big Gigabyte only user for years up until recently. Their products always gave me little issue and just worked, then I tried some of their Z690 motherboards and had nothing but issues. I have bounced between Asus and MSI and so far so good with them.
 

sblantipodi

2[H]4U
Joined
Aug 29, 2010
Messages
3,678
they have released a firmware without a single test, this new firmware is creating big problems to everyone.
there are wrong voltages given to the CPU with CPUs with crazy high temps.

they gave this firmware to Microsoft to use it with the Microsoft Windows update.

this firmware is "destroying" all the Asus Z690 boards via a windows update.

on another forum the well known Safedisk from Asus said:
Sorry
There are some issues with the new microcode that supports Raptor Lake
To fix this, have to wait for the intel new microcode
If you have any problems, please do a bios rollback
Thanks

they released a firmware without a single test with a problem that everyone can reproduce and they say that the problem is inside the Intel Microcontroller.
they don't have the grey matter to understand that the problem is that they release bioses without a single test.
 

MrCaffeineX

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Aug 22, 2011
Messages
1,587
they have released a firmware without a single test, this new firmware is creating big problems to everyone.
there are wrong voltages given to the CPU with CPUs with crazy high temps.

they gave this firmware to Microsoft to use it with the Microsoft Windows update.

this firmware is "destroying" all the Asus Z690 boards via a windows update.

on another forum the well known Safedisk from Asus said:


they released a firmware without a single test with a problem that everyone can reproduce and they say that the problem is inside the Intel Microcontroller.
they don't have the grey matter to understand that the problem is that they release bioses without a single test.
This is the part that I will never understand. Why is Microsoft issuing firmware (BIOS) updates via Windows Update? It is going to cause problems. It is inevitable. There are [H] users that don't flash their BIOS out of fear of breaking things. Why would anyone think this is a good idea for a normal user to be doing this through a relatively automated process while simultaneously installing other software and/or driver updates to the system?

My friend ran into this issue posted over on the News sub forum: https://hardforum.com/threads/do-your-firmware-updates-before-installing-kb5012170.2021408/ While I know it's not exactly the same, I consider it related. I also understand that the distinction between firmware and the software running on the platform is a lot grayer since the adoption of UEFI, but it would really make our jobs easier in IT if things were tested thoroughly before deployment or if Microsoft would just stop rolling out firmware updates via Windows Update.

We lost a laptop a few weeks ago to the dreaded auto-enabled BitLocker (laptop only had local user accounts, user was not signed in to a Microsoft account, system is not joined to the domain nor to Azure AD, etc.) following a Windows Update that included a firmware update which enabled a setting related to the TPM chip that triggered the BitLocker lockout on reboot...Annoying to say the least.

With respect to the actual topic at hand: every manufacturer makes good and bad products. I try to research them as much as possible prior to making a purchase if it's going to be in one of my main systems and then go with the one that appears to be the best for the application.

Anecdotally, I would say that Supermicro has been the most rock-solid when it comes to motherboard quality, in my experience. I've had mixed luck with ASUS dating back to the Athlon XP days, including with their customer service. MSI has been solid out of the gate, but EVERY motherboard that I have had from them has died after 5 years or so. Gigabyte has held up well, but I've had more of them arrive DOA or die within warranty than the other manufacturers and their RMA process was terrible.

My current setups include a Gigabyte X570 in the office (purchased from another user here, if I recall correctly), an ASUS B450 in my wife's PC, an ASUS Z590 in my son's PC, and an Asrock B550 in my home PC. All were well-reviewed when I researched them prior to pulling the trigger on the purchases, except the Gigabyte motherboard, which was admittedly an impulse buy at a great price that was too good to pass up. I have another Asrock B450 motherboard in storage as a spare in case one of our AMD setups goes down.

I love EVGA video cards. I've owned a lot and currently own a few different ones. I have a handful of their PSUs. Their customer service has generally been top-notch. I've also been burned by their B-Stock store a few times and have an ongoing RMA with them now for a B-Stock PSU that initially arrived DOA, then the replacement died within a few months...

The moral of the story is that brand loyalty only goes so far, and being a savvy consumer is probably more important than being loyal to a particular brand. Also, Microsoft, please stop issuing firmware updates through Windows Update or at least make them optional so the average user doesn't brick their PC and blame their IT guy for it!
 
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