LAN port speed query

greatchap

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Hello Everyone,

I recently subscribed for a 250 MBPS internet connection. However when I did speed test the speed shows up to 95 MBPS.

The ISP gave me a high end router. My PC in which I did the connection test is connect to another router i.e. Netgear WNR612 (via LAN) which is connected to the hi speed router (via lan cable).

When I checked my adapter i.e Intel 82579V Gigabit Network connection, in the link speed tab it shows 100MBPS/full duplex.

What is the reason I am unable to get higher speeds (e.g. 250 mbps) when doing speed test ? Is the network adapter old or netgear router. How can I solve it ?

Regards,
GR
 

criccio

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Hm, i didn't look that long but I can say that's an old'ish router. There are no Gigabit capable Ethernet ports on the back, only Fast Ethernet which is limited to 100Mb/s. This explains your speed issue. You'll need a new/different router with Gigabit LAN (and a WAN for that matter) ports to take advantage of your new speed.
 

NoOther

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Hello Everyone,

I recently subscribed for a 250 MBPS internet connection. However when I did speed test the speed shows up to 95 MBPS.

The ISP gave me a high end router. My PC in which I did the connection test is connect to another router i.e. Netgear WNR612 (via LAN) which is connected to the hi speed router (via lan cable).

When I checked my adapter i.e Intel 82579V Gigabit Network connection, in the link speed tab it shows 100MBPS/full duplex.

What is the reason I am unable to get higher speeds (e.g. 250 mbps) when doing speed test ? Is the network adapter old or netgear router. How can I solve it ?

Regards,
GR

To be clear you mean you signed up for 250Mbps, not MBPS, big difference. You are also limited to only 100Mbps by your network. To get more than that you need a 1000Mbps or 1Gbps network. All devices between you and the ISP router must be able to do 1000Mbps and plugged into ports that are designated as 1000Mbps ports. You also need at least a CAT5e cable.

Even then you are likely rarely going to get the full 250Mbps, but you should generally get better than 200Mbps depending on your network.
 

criccio

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Basically, your ISP did NOT give you a "high end router" and whoever you spoke with, I would get right back to them and ask for an actual modern router that is capable of over 100Mb/s speeds.
 

dvsman

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Always test with a direct connection to the pipe. You're connecting to a router, that is connected to another router. Even under the best conditions it won't be at rated speeds.

Hook your PC to the modem (skip all the routers) and see what speeds you get.
 

NoOther

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Basically, your ISP did NOT give you a "high end router" and whoever you spoke with, I would get right back to them and ask for an actual modern router that is capable of over 100Mb/s speeds.

How can you say that when his own router does not support 1000Mbps over LAN? From the documentation on the Netgear WRN612:

Five (5) 10/100 (1 WAN and 4 LAN) Fast
Ethernet ports with auto-sensing technology
 

criccio

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How can you say that when his own router does not support 1000Mbps over LAN? From the documentation on the Netgear WRN612:

Huh? I think we're on the same page so i'm not understanding your question. That is literally what my first post said. He needs a Gigabit capable router.
 

NoOther

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Huh? I think we're on the same page so i'm not understanding your question. That is literally what my first post said. He needs a Gigabit capable router.

It is HIS router that is not the high end router, not the ISP. Read his post:

The ISP gave me a high end router. My PC in which I did the connection test is connect to another router i.e. Netgear WNR612 (via LAN) which is connected to the hi speed router (via lan cable).

The ISP gave him a high end router, called it ISPA. He has a router, the Netgear WNR612, call it HOMEB. He has a computer with a gigabit ethernet card, call it ETHC.

ETHC->HOMEB->ISPA.

His computer's adapter is showing a connection at 100Mbps. It would only show its negotiated speed with the device it is attached to, which is HOMEB, his personal router, not the ISP router. The documentation for his personal router is the one that states it only has 10/100Mbps LAN ports.

You are telling him his ISP didn't give him a high end router, but we do not actually know that. What we do know is his router is not capable of those speeds over LAN.

EDIT: What he needs to do is what dvsman suggested and plug his system directly into the ISP router and see what his speeds are.

Coincidentally I have a similar issue and my home router is capable of doing 1000Mbps, but for some reason is not allowing that connection anymore. When I connect directly to my ISP router, I get full 1000Mbps over the LAN. So until you remove the intervening devices, we have no idea what may or may not be going on with the ISP side of things.
 

greatchap

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Thank you guys for your replies.

The router that ISP gave me is a Dlink router model : DIR-825ACG1

As NoOther clearly stated :

My PC -> Netgear router -> Dlink Router

Anyway in order to get better speed do I need to only upgrade my Netgear router only or my Ethernet card as well.
 

criccio

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You need to remove your Netgear router entirely as its 100% limiting your speeds to 100Mb/s. I misread and didn't realize there were two routers at play but that doesn't change much.

If that old Netgear router is in the mix, you will never see past what you're seeing now.

You shouldn't have two routers anyway, just remove the Netgear and you're good.


At that point, if you're still not happy you can do all the testing you want from your modem but at this point, the given is that older Netgear. Remove and retry.
 

Rifter0876

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Even gigabit is only good for roughly 100MBPS, which is what op is reporting he is getting. You are going to need to step up to 10gbe network router and all to fully utilize a 250MBps pipe.
 

NoOther

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You shouldn't have two routers anyway, just remove the Netgear and you're good.

This is something I also don't really recommend, as typically the ISP does not give you full access to their router. There are many things you cannot block or prevent if you are only relying on the ISP. With your own router you can setup more security and filtering. OF course this is dependent on knowing how to do that.
 

NoOther

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Even gigabit is only good for roughly 100MBPS, which is what op is reporting he is getting. You are going to need to step up to 10gbe network router and all to fully utilize a 250MBps pipe.

His connection isn't 250MBps, it is 250Mbps, which GB is fully capable of handling. He is just not using proper notation.
 

vegeta535

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Like others said you don't need the Netgear router in there. If you actually need more ports you could just buy a gigabit hub. Also make sure they actually have you that router and not charging you a monthly rental fee for it. If they do buy your own and give that pos back to the internet provider.
 

Rifter0876

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His connection isn't 250MBps, it is 250Mbps, which GB is fully capable of handling. He is just not using proper notation.

That would make sense for residential internet. It just threw me off that he claimed 250MBps pipe and was only getting 95MBps which is pretty much exactly right for a gigabit network.
 

greatchap

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Appreciate your support guys.

Yes, i am sorry for using the wrong notation. My ISP speed is 250 Megabits (Mbps).

I need the second router because my pc is far from the main router. Plus the second router enables me to use WI-FI in that part of the house.

So what is the final verdict, I just need to upgrade my Netgear router only or my Ethernet card as well.

Rifter0876: didn't understand "It just threw me off that he claimed 250MBps pipe and was only getting 95MBps which is pretty much exactly right for a gigabit network."
 

NoOther

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Appreciate your support guys.

Yes, i am sorry for using the wrong notation. My ISP speed is 250 Megabits (Mbps).

I need the second router because my pc is far from the main router. Plus the second router enables me to use WI-FI in that part of the house.

So what is the final verdict, I just need to upgrade my Netgear router only or my Ethernet card as well.

Rifter0876: didn't understand "It just threw me off that he claimed 250MBps pipe and was only getting 95MBps which is pretty much exactly right for a gigabit network."

You should only have to upgrade your home router, specifically if you are connecting via ethernet cable, you need CAT5e or CAT6 cables and you need to verify the Router has Gb LAN ports which can operate at 1000Mbps. If your ethernet card is using the "Intel 82579V" adapter it should already be capable of 1000Mbps.

I am not sure what kind of Wi-Fi you are using for your house, if you only need B/G/N, then there is no need for an AC router. However, if you plan on having AC adapters, it is something to look into. There is a fairly cheap router than can do B/G/N, as well as AC, and has 1000Gbps ports and is pretty exceptional for its price, The Phicomm K3C AC 1900. Note, there are plenty of other good options out there for routers, this is just my particular suggestion atm.

Another thing to note, is the distance between each device. CAT5e is really only good out to 100 meters, which means you need some device or repeater every 100 meters to maintain effectiveness.

EDIT: As for what Rifter0876 is referring to speed wise, 1Gbps is roughly equivalent to 125MBps. There are 8 bits in a byte. So if you take Mbps and divide by 8, you roughly get the equivalent speed in MBps. Although that is not exact, as there are actually 1024 Bytes in a MB. and 1024 MB in a GB.
 

tedych

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1 Mbit = 1000 Kbit everywhere. The binary powers are marked with MiBit etc.
Also due to 8b/10b encoding and other overhead, 1Gbit is really about 110-115MB/s usable.
The "100mbit" problem could lie everywhere in the chain of devices/cables/software. Bad cables (low quality), bad crimping of connectors, incompatible drivers or standards or devices, settings etc.

Edit: yes, regarding the reply of NoOther below, he is right, the 8b10b incurs 25% overhead which is accounted for in the raw bandwidth and which is not that 125-115MB/s I was taking about. There are other overhead factors that decrease the usable bandwidth one can see e.g. when copying files.
 
Last edited:

greatchap

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You should only have to upgrade your home router, specifically if you are connecting via ethernet cable, you need CAT5e or CAT6 cables and you need to verify the Router has Gb LAN ports which can operate at 1000Mbps. If your ethernet card is using the "Intel 82579V" adapter it should already be capable of 1000Mbps.

I am not sure what kind of Wi-Fi you are using for your house, if you only need B/G/N, then there is no need for an AC router. However, if you plan on having AC adapters, it is something to look into. There is a fairly cheap router than can do B/G/N, as well as AC, and has 1000Gbps ports and is pretty exceptional for its price, The Phicomm K3C AC 1900. Note, there are plenty of other good options out there for routers, this is just my particular suggestion atm.

Another thing to note, is the distance between each device. CAT5e is really only good out to 100 meters, which means you need some device or repeater every 100 meters to maintain effectiveness.

EDIT: As for what Rifter0876 is referring to speed wise, 1Gbps is roughly equivalent to 125MBps. There are 8 bits in a byte. So if you take Mbps and divide by 8, you roughly get the equivalent speed in MBps. Although that is not exact, as there are actually 1024 Bytes in a MB. and 1024 MB in a GB.

Please suggest me a router by going to www.amazon.co.in which will do the job and is cheap. The model you have suggested is expensive in my country. I need a router with a gigabit LAN port & Wi-fi (I guess).

You wrote "You should only have to upgrade your home router, specifically if you are connecting via ethernet cable". Yes, the Netgear router is connected via Ethernet cable from the main router as I have stated in my posts.

Plus I don't know which CAT Ethernet cable I am using but will a standard Ethernet cable do the job or I have to ask for a specific CATX cable to get that speed.

@ As for what Rifter0876 is referring to speed wise, 1Gbps is roughly equivalent to 125MBps. [It just threw me off that he claimed 250MBps pipe and was only getting 95MBps which is pretty much exactly right for a gigabit network]. If the pipe is 250MBps then its 2000 Gbps. So why will he say for a 250 MBps pipe getting 95 MBps is OK.
 

IdiotInCharge

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Let's see if some of the confusion can be cut:

Your personal Netgear router needs to go, because it only supports Fast Ethernet which is limited to 100Mbps (so the ~95Mbps you're getting is actually good!).
Now, if the device that the ISP gave you is a router, you do not want another router unless you can set the ISP device to 'bridge' mode.

The reason for this, hinted at above, is that you don't want to go through two routers in a home/consumer environment because doing so requires Network Address Translation to handle multiple IPs behind one public IP. This situation is generally called 'dual NATing' and will cause problems with internet access that are hard to hunt down after the fact.

Therefore, I see two options forward:
  1. Best case, you can set the ISP device to bridge mode, and then you can add a modern router to provide a gigabit link that will handle your full internet speed as well as provide WiFi
  2. Otherwise, you can use the ISP device as a router, and instead of getting a new personal router to replace your current one, get a WiFi access point, which is used to extend the network provided by the ISP router with WiFi
 

greatchap

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Let's see if some of the confusion can be cut:

Your personal Netgear router needs to go, because it only supports Fast Ethernet which is limited to 100Mbps (so the ~95Mbps you're getting is actually good!).
Now, if the device that the ISP gave you is a router, you do not want another router unless you can set the ISP device to 'bridge' mode.

The reason for this, hinted at above, is that you don't want to go through two routers in a home/consumer environment because doing so requires Network Address Translation to handle multiple IPs behind one public IP. This situation is generally called 'dual NATing' and will cause problems with internet access that are hard to hunt down after the fact.

Therefore, I see two options forward:
  1. Best case, you can set the ISP device to bridge mode, and then you can add a modern router to provide a gigabit link that will handle your full internet speed as well as provide WiFi
  2. Otherwise, you can use the ISP device as a router, and instead of getting a new personal router to replace your current one, get a WiFi access point, which is used to extend the network provided by the ISP router with WiFi

Thank you for your reply. I have a few questions and will be glad if it can be answered :

1) If I set the main ISP router in bridge mode will it still function as an independent router (for e.g. its wifi can be used to work on internet). Or it only becomes a bridge.
2) Can that bridged router connect to another normal router (maybe more than 1) via Ethernet
3) Can you give me some names of modem routers which I can use for this purpose (replacing Netgear one)
4) If I replace my current router with a wifi access point then my pc wont work because it connects via ethernet cable

B.T.W. for last several years I have used this kind of setup i.e. main router connected to 2 other routers to give internet in corner areas of house and never had a problem.
 

NoOther

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For network speeds 1 Mbit = 1000 kbit

1 Mbit = 1000 Kbit everywhere. The binary powers are marked with MiBit etc.
Also due to 8b/10b encoding and other overhead, 1Gbit is really about 110-115MB/s usable.
The "100mbit" problem could lie everywhere in the chain of devices/cables/software. Bad cables (low quality), bad crimping of connectors, incompatible drivers or standards or devices, settings etc.

This is getting a little off the topic, but just to clear this up, here you go. There is still some disparity out there of how companies are actually using the terms, which is why I said roughly. The one thing that is constant is there are always 8 bits in a byte.

So in my example, you first convert Gbps to Mbps which should be 1000, then you divide by 8 to get Bytes.

1 Gbps = 1000 Mbps
1000 Mbps = 125 MBps.

Depending on if they are using 1024 instead of 1000 as the conversion changes the amount slightly. The bandwidth available is never less due to encoding, the link overhead encoding you are speaking about (8b10b) is not part of your bandwidth speed. So if they are giving you 250Mbps your max is actually 250Mbps to their router. This is because they are not providing you a 250Mbps link, they are providing you raw bandwidth. The encoding is done on the link between the actual devices which is typically a line capable of much higher speeds (IE 1Gbe fiber). Now why you rarely see that is additional network overhead by the various devices and/or services in the mix.

Just to explain this a bit more, let's assume that 8b/10b was not accounted for. Then instead of 95Mbps, he would be seeing a maximum of 80Mbps since there is a 20% overhead on your bandwidth if you had to account for the encoding (actually it is closer to 25%). Most specifically you can read about it here in regards to ethernet. You can see where they claim the speed is 1000Mbps, it is actually 1250Mbps to account for link encoding.

"The IEEE 802.3z standard includes 1000BASE-SX for transmission over multi-mode fiber, 1000BASE-LX for transmission over single-mode fiber, and the nearly obsolete 1000BASE-CX for transmission over shielded balanced copper cabling. These standards use 8b/10b encoding, which inflates the line rate by 25%, from 1000 Mbit/s to 1250 Mbit/s, to ensure a DC balanced signal. The symbols are then sent using NRZ."

Now what they do not account for is your actual data transmission speed, because that is determined by how much overhead is in your packets, distances, other protocols, dropped packets, etc.

Anyway, that is my introductory talk on transmission speeds. Tune in next time when we talk about all the other crazy stuff that happens in networks, especially the differences between copper, fiber, shielded, twisted, etc. =]
 

NoOther

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Let's see if some of the confusion can be cut:

Your personal Netgear router needs to go, because it only supports Fast Ethernet which is limited to 100Mbps (so the ~95Mbps you're getting is actually good!).
Now, if the device that the ISP gave you is a router, you do not want another router unless you can set the ISP device to 'bridge' mode.

The reason for this, hinted at above, is that you don't want to go through two routers in a home/consumer environment because doing so requires Network Address Translation to handle multiple IPs behind one public IP. This situation is generally called 'dual NATing' and will cause problems with internet access that are hard to hunt down after the fact.

Therefore, I see two options forward:
  1. Best case, you can set the ISP device to bridge mode, and then you can add a modern router to provide a gigabit link that will handle your full internet speed as well as provide WiFi
  2. Otherwise, you can use the ISP device as a router, and instead of getting a new personal router to replace your current one, get a WiFi access point, which is used to extend the network provided by the ISP router with WiFi

Thank you for your reply. I have a few questions and will be glad if it can be answered :

1) If I set the main ISP router in bridge mode will it still function as an independent router (for e.g. its wifi can be used to work on internet). Or it only becomes a bridge.
2) Can that bridged router connect to another normal router (maybe more than 1) via Ethernet
3) Can you give me some names of modem routers which I can use for this purpose (replacing Netgear one)
4) If I replace my current router with a wifi access point then my pc wont work because it connects via ethernet cable

B.T.W. for last several years I have used this kind of setup i.e. main router connected to 2 other routers to give internet in corner areas of house and never had a problem.

So this is a good point, but I wasn't trying to get too complicated with the setup. I am not also sure that your ISP will allow you to configure their router for bridge mode.

1) If you set the ISP router to bridge mode it will form a bridge between two networks, allowing you to share networks and IP ranges rather than having to have separate networks.
2) If you set the ISP router to bridge mode, you would then only need to set up a Wireless Access Point (WAP). This is like an extension of the router. Devices connect to the Access Point, but get their DHCP extended from the router.
3) Ubiquiti is a very popular brand for both routers and access points. I am not sure about their cost in your area though.
4) Wireless Access Points can also have LAN ports on them, they are not just wireless devices. For instance this model has 2 10/100/1000 ports. Also note, with this configuration you could also just plug in a cheaper 10/100/1000 switch into the Access Point to provide more LAN ports.

If you really need to fill a larger area with WiFi and you are currently using multiple home routers in addition to the main router, I would highly suggest IdiotInCharge 's suggestion for WAPs. They really are the most effective way to do this with the minimum amount of hassle.
 

greatchap

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Thank you very much NoOther. Taking time out to explain and to guide me.

Please see my feedback here :

1) I understand that the best way to work is to create a bridge in my main ISP router. Connect that router with other access points and then use the internet.
2) Currently 1 have 3 routers in the house. (a) Main router (b) 1 router which is on corner (Netgear) (c) Another router which is in opposite corner (TP Link)

Problem

1) I am unable to find a device which is not a router but an extended and support ethernet and wifi. The device you have suggested is very expensive here. I also did a little bit of searching but only found wireless repeaters / extenders.
2) I am not sure as of now I my Dlink router can form a bridge which can connect more than 1 router/extender.

Solution
1) Either I continue with the same setup and just replace my netgear router with a faster one so that I get the speed desired. So far I never faced any problem in this setup though. If you can suggest a name it will be great. Plus in a normal router Can can I turn off NAT and use it in like the way you want ?
2) If you have an alternative let me know.
 

tedych

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Setting the ISP device to bridged mode (by yourself or the ISP) just makes this device a simple .. bridge which will pass the IP along to your next device which should be a router. Another device connected to this router should be connected via their LAN ports so they are simple switches (and APs if needed) and that's all - they will all form a simple local (broadcast) network, so the other "routers" will act like APs and switches.
If you, for some reason, want to use the ISP device as router, you don't bridge it and use its LAN ports for local devices and if it has only one LAN, you can use your own switch(es) to extend the local network. Most likely the ISP device is some crap router so you bridge it and use your main router as a border device for your network.
 

IdiotInCharge

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Solution
1) Either I continue with the same setup and just replace my netgear router with a faster one so that I get the speed desired. So far I never faced any problem in this setup though. If you can suggest a name it will be great. Plus in a normal router Can can I turn off NAT and use it in like the way you want ?
2) If you have an alternative let me know.

Something of note- many consumer WiFi routers can act as wireless access points, as an option in their firmware. That's something worth checking up on within your local market.

Think of it as, instead of setting the ISP device to bridge mode, you're setting your router to bridge mode instead. You get the extended WiFi and you're not double-NATing.
 

greatchap

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My router is DLink DIR-825ACG1. I could not find bridge mode settings in the console.

I thought in Bridge mode all you need to do is turn it on then connect a few routers to that main router. In case I do not use bridge mode and the standard setup I am using now then what is the issue. If double Nating is happening then also does it make a big difference ?
 

IdiotInCharge

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I thought in Bridge mode all you need to do is turn it on then connect a few routers to that main router. In case I do not use bridge mode and the standard setup I am using now then what is the issue. If double Nating is happening then also does it make a big difference ?

Put it this way: if it works, it works.

It's not recommended, and there are things that it will break. Thus it'd be better to avoid this configuration while you're upgrading so that you avoid issues related to dual-NATing in the future.

The good news is that, if you're just going to run the D-Link as a router, the other 'routers' you can just run in 'access point mode'. Instead of setting up their own NAT service, in access point mode they'll 'bridge' your wired connection to WiFi.

You just either need to buy actual access points or buy WiFi routers that can be used as access points.
 

greatchap

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Put it this way: if it works, it works.

It's not recommended, and there are things that it will break. Thus it'd be better to avoid this configuration while you're upgrading so that you avoid issues related to dual-NATing in the future.

The good news is that, if you're just going to run the D-Link as a router, the other 'routers' you can just run in 'access point mode'. Instead of setting up their own NAT service, in access point mode they'll 'bridge' your wired connection to WiFi.

You just either need to buy actual access points or buy WiFi routers that can be used as access points.

Great !!! So what I think I need to do is just buy router that can be used as access points. I don't need to do any bridge setting i the main DLink router (didn't find that option anyways).
Now the funny thing is I am unable to locate the gateway of my netgear router. My dns is 192.168.0.1 which brings up the setting for main DLink router. I tried a few options including removing the connecting Ethernet cable but still cant find the gateway for Netgear router.
 

tedych

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Every router can work as simple AP/switch (bridge) as long as its DHCP service can be turned off and you don't use its WAN port (only LAN ports) without any other "special" configuration.
The gateway of your (current) netgear router is the Dlink's address I presume. Using DHCP on your computer, try to just connect the PC to the dlink and you'll find out its IP settings.
 

greatchap

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I am thinking of buying TP-Link Archer C1200 Gigabit Wireless Wi-Fi Router. To know more please click here. What do you guys think ?

tedych: I am able to connect to DLink router interface but not netgear. Saw IP setting but it did not help.
 

scrappymouse

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You could always get rid of the 'extra' routers, Others have mentioned why you should do this, and that you shouldn't really have multiple routers being used on the same network. I understand that you are using these to extend the wife/ethernet, but there are other devices out there for those purpose. Have you looked at These?,
While you CAN use your current routers for the purpose you want, you will have to configure them correctly to act like a different device(set every 'extra' router to AP mode in it's firmware) Some AP's also have an additional ethernet port that you can connect a switch too if you need multiple ports in each location you have a router.
 

greatchap

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Thank you very much people.

I will purchase a router and set the device in Access Point mode. I think this will help.
 

greatchap

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I have bought the router and configured it as an access point. It is working fine now. In network properties now I see 1 GBPS/Full Duplex. However there are 2 problems :

1) In speed test I only see speeds up to 95 Mbps (like before) and not 250 Mbps as I thought it should show as I updated my router. (I have also told this to the ISP & they will check)
2) After I set the router as access point I am unable to access its console. Is this normal ? Only the main router console is accessible.
 

NoOther

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I have bought the router and configured it as an access point. It is working fine now. In network properties now I see 1 GBPS/Full Duplex. However there are 2 problems :

1) In speed test I only see speeds up to 95 Mbps (like before) and not 250 Mbps as I thought it should show as I updated my router. (I have also told this to the ISP & they will check)
2) After I set the router as access point I am unable to access its console. Is this normal ? Only the main router console is accessible.

1) Could still be a problem negotiating speed between the routers in the setup. Your system will show 1Gbps connection because that is only accounting for your connection to the immediate network device it is attached to. There could also be some issues in the various systems between you and the speed test hop, where ever that may be.
2) This may be because the original IP address you were using to access the router is now no longer valid since it is part of a different network with no route to it. Some models will not allow you to access the GUI when they are in bridge mode or not allow you to change the default IP for the interface. You would have to do a factory reset on the router to be able to access its GUI again or you would have to define a route to that device from the main router handling DHCP. Many routers will still allow you to assign an IP or access their GUI when in bridge mode. In that case, you need to set a specific IP address to it in the IP range of the main router handling DHCP. You will also want to make sure that it is not in the DHCP range in use.

IE -- Main router is using network 192.168.1.0/24
-- DHCP range is 192.168.1.100-192.168.1.254
-- Set IP for 192.168.1.10
 

BinarySynapse

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
14,978
You're making a lot of extra work for yourself. Stick to one router. Then as you deem necessary, add gigabit switches for wired connectivity and WAPs for wireless (or just WAPs with switches). You'll save yourself a ton of headaches when eventually you'll have to reset one of those routers and not remember what settings need changed to get everything working again.
 

greatchap

Weaksauce
Joined
Mar 22, 2012
Messages
90
The ISP checked that the cable coming from the main router to my secondary router/access point is CAT 5 which only supports speeds up to 100 MBPS. I will now buy a CAT 6 cable so that the final bottle neck is plugged.

My primary address is 192.168.0.1 (main router). I have set the lan ip as 192.168.0.2 for secondary router. However accessing its console still did not work. Not a big deal as I don't need to access it all the time.

One time work and then I should be okay. Finding a proper access point device with Ethernet support to&fro was tough so adopted to this model.
 
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