Klipsch Promedia 5.1's - Amp repair

Joined
Aug 20, 2017
Messages
12
my original v2 400 has a constant hissing noise from the satellites now. Was working great for 22 years until now.

is this usually a capacitor problem?

I removed the amp, and I think I see a slightly bulging 47uf 50v cap, but I'm too uninformed to know if this is what might be causing the issue.

View attachment 497419

View attachment 497420
Hi,
The bulging capacitor should definitely be replaced. I recommend using Panasonic FR replacements. If you had a 4.1 (with the push button switch), I would look for charred adhesive on the bottoms side of the circuit board inside the control pod/preamplifier, which can cause white noise. There are two other 47 uF 50v capacitors in the amplifier panel that are almost certainly degraded, which should also be replaced. I expect you have other degraded components, such as a 2.2 uF electrolytic capacitor, and possibly a zener diode. Other capacitors are also likely degraded, but would not typically cause the hiss your describe (e.g., 63v 470 uF). You can find a kit on ebay with those parts, titled "Klipsch ProMedia 4.1 v.2-400 Parts Upgrade Kit Computer Speakers Repair". (You'll recognize who produces it). If you have not checked the foam surrounds in recent years, pulling the 6.5" grills will let you see if the foam is brittle. You should be able to touch and gently press the foam without it creasing or crumbling. Contact me if you would like info about some matching refoam kits, or having me refoam the speakers for you. Klipsch uses 6 ohm impedance, so you don't want to use 4 ohms, and 8 ohms will decrease the performance. Ebay listing number 332229420536 has photos showing how to remove the grills without destroying them.
I don't know where you can find newer compact systems with the power and clarity of the ProMedia v.2-400/4.1 and 5.1, with their four output MOSFETs per channel. I hope this helps.
Henry
 

Pivo504

2[H]4U
Joined
Feb 18, 2005
Messages
2,925
Hi,
The bulging capacitor should definitely be replaced. I recommend using Panasonic FR replacements. If you had a 4.1 (with the push button switch), I would look for charred adhesive on the bottoms side of the circuit board inside the control pod/preamplifier, which can cause white noise. There are two other 47 uF 50v capacitors in the amplifier panel that are almost certainly degraded, which should also be replaced. I expect you have other degraded components, such as a 2.2 uF electrolytic capacitor, and possibly a zener diode. Other capacitors are also likely degraded, but would not typically cause the hiss your describe (e.g., 63v 470 uF). You can find a kit on ebay with those parts, titled "Klipsch ProMedia 4.1 v.2-400 Parts Upgrade Kit Computer Speakers Repair". (You'll recognize who produces it). If you have not checked the foam surrounds in recent years, pulling the 6.5" grills will let you see if the foam is brittle. You should be able to touch and gently press the foam without it creasing or crumbling. Contact me if you would like info about some matching refoam kits, or having me refoam the speakers for you. Klipsch uses 6 ohm impedance, so you don't want to use 4 ohms, and 8 ohms will decrease the performance. Ebay listing number 332229420536 has photos showing how to remove the grills without destroying them.
I don't know where you can find newer compact systems with the power and clarity of the ProMedia v.2-400/4.1 and 5.1, with their four output MOSFETs per channel. I hope this helps.
Henry
Henry were you the one that did repairs on my stuff? I'm having an issue to where I think only 2 channels are working. However I'm not sure if it's an actual issue with the internals or the 3.5mm jacks? Is there any tips on how I can find out?
 
Joined
Aug 20, 2017
Messages
12
Henry were you the one that did repairs on my stuff? I'm having an issue to where I think only 2 channels are working. However I'm not sure if it's an actual issue with the internals or the 3.5mm jacks? Is there any tips on how I can find out?
Hi, I may have done your repair. (Your ID here does not show up in my file, but I may have you stored under your given name). The 3.5 mm cables are responsible for about three out of every four ProMedia 5.1 loss of channel issues such as you describe. About one in five is due to a sound card issue (it happens more than people think), and perhaps one in twenty is due to multiple speakers actually failing (burned coils), or speaker wires not seating well in the speaker output terminals at the back of the subwoofer.
One test to try: At the ProMedia's subwoofer, I would unplug the cable for the channels that still are working, and plug that into one of the other inputs that have not been working. Does the sound then move with the cable to play on the other channels?
The input cables are so prone to oxidation and internal failures that I have not used Klipsch's originals for several years. (For some reason, the 4.1 input cables are better made). Just today I got a roll of professional Hosa 20-gauge microphone cable with excellent shielding and have started to assemble cables with Neutrik (REAN) plugs for the ProMedia systems. If your cables are defective, I can recommend a couple of brands, or can even provide some custom, pro-grade cables.
Whenever I repair a ProMedia 5.1, I apply some DeOxit cleaner to the 3.5mm input jacks. It would not hurt to apply contact cleaner or rubbing alcohol to your input cables' plugs' metal surfaces. It does not take much contamination for a that low voltage connection to be disrupted.
Henry
 

Pivo504

2[H]4U
Joined
Feb 18, 2005
Messages
2,925
Hi, I may have done your repair. (Your ID here does not show up in my file, but I may have you stored under your given name). The 3.5 mm cables are responsible for about three out of every four ProMedia 5.1 loss of channel issues such as you describe. About one in five is due to a sound card issue (it happens more than people think), and perhaps one in twenty is due to multiple speakers actually failing (burned coils), or speaker wires not seating well in the speaker output terminals at the back of the subwoofer.
One test to try: At the ProMedia's subwoofer, I would unplug the cable for the channels that still are working, and plug that into one of the other inputs that have not been working. Does the sound then move with the cable to play on the other channels?
The input cables are so prone to oxidation and internal failures that I have not used Klipsch's originals for several years. (For some reason, the 4.1 input cables are better made). Just today I got a roll of professional Hosa 20-gauge microphone cable with excellent shielding and have started to assemble cables with Neutrik (REAN) plugs for the ProMedia systems. If your cables are defective, I can recommend a couple of brands, or can even provide some custom, pro-grade cables.
Whenever I repair a ProMedia 5.1, I apply some DeOxit cleaner to the 3.5mm input jacks. It would not hurt to apply contact cleaner or rubbing alcohol to your input cables' plugs' metal surfaces. It does not take much contamination for a that low voltage connection to be disrupted.
Henry
So I have two cables coming from the klipsch main speaker a green and a pink. I've had to resort to the pink cable. I've tried each of my four speakers into the input that works and all 4 work so it's not the speakers. I'm guessing the cable or one of the four channels on the klipsch internal board. Whenever I had the green plugged I'd get strange static sometimes. The test you mentioned to try are your saying to upgrade the thin speaker wires from the channels working to another channel to see what happens? Lmk I'd like to figure out what went out as I was down to 2 speakers now I'm down to 1
 
Joined
Aug 20, 2017
Messages
12
So I have two cables coming from the klipsch main speaker a green and a pink. I've had to resort to the pink cable. I've tried each of my four speakers into the input that works and all 4 work so it's not the speakers. I'm guessing the cable or one of the four channels on the klipsch internal board. Whenever I had the green plugged I'd get strange static sometimes. The test you mentioned to try are your saying to upgrade the thin speaker wires from the channels working to another channel to see what happens? Lmk I'd like to figure out what went out as I was down to 2 speakers now I'm down to 1
The Klipsch individual amplifier boards fail only very rarely (about one in 500 repairs), and then it is a single board that fails, not a pair. The input cables fail so frequently that I won't reuse them, and the static you describe is consistent with a failing cable or oxidized connectors/mating surfaces. I am not recommending a change in speaker wires for this issue. Monoprice makes decent 3.5 mm trs cables. Hosa makes some very nice cables, e.g., their #HMM-010.
 
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
Messages
3,293
The Klipsch individual amplifier boards fail only very rarely (about one in 500 repairs), and then it is a single board that fails, not a pair. The input cables fail so frequently that I won't reuse them, and the static you describe is consistent with a failing cable or oxidized connectors/mating surfaces. I am not recommending a change in speaker wires for this issue. Monoprice makes decent 3.5 mm trs cables. Hosa makes some very nice cables, e.g., their #HMM-010.
Do you recommend replacing the 3.5mm cables? I'm still using the stock ones and things seem okay.
 
Joined
Aug 20, 2017
Messages
12
Do you recommend replacing the 3.5mm cables? I'm still using the stock ones and things seem okay.
I would not replace cables that are still working fine. However, if you ever do have issues with noise or loss of one or more channels, the first place to look would be the input cables. A bad cable, especially if it is intermittent, can cause many headaches trying to track down the source. The cables can still look new, yet be degraded internally. If a noise is present without any input cables connected to the amplifier panel, then you can rule them out. I just started assembling custom input cables with 20 gauge Hosa CMX microphone cable and gold-plated Neutrik REAN connectors. The cable has excellent, dense, OFC shielding, but it is slow work to assemble. I plan to take plenty of time to use up 700 feet of that cable. Most uses do not need that level of cable, nor gilded plugs.
 
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