It's versus times for archaic technology WD vs. Seagate 4TB

SpongeBob

The Contraceptive Under the Sea
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Jan 15, 2011
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793
long story short our PLEX server drive died. I'd like to run 2 of these things and 1 mirroring the other one so I don't have to do this again. Do you know of any free software that will mirror one drive and if one drive dies I can just add a new drive to mirror the other one?

I'm looking at these options cause they are less expensive. I have no idea if 64mb vs 256mb cache matters, I am honestly still surprised we don't have 4TB SSD's for this price you'd think they would be dirt cheap to produce compared to actual mechanical devices.

https://www.newegg.ca/seagate-barra...=4tb hdd&cm_re=4tb_hdd-_-22-179-299-_-Product
VERSUS
https://www.newegg.ca/blue-wd40ezrz...=4tb hdd&cm_re=4tb_hdd-_-22-235-011-_-Product

Thanks!
 

DejaWiz

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SpongeBob

The Contraceptive Under the Sea
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Jan 15, 2011
Messages
793
Do you have space in there for a triple drive RAID5? That would give you the combined size of two drives, plus the third as spare. You could go with triple 2TB drives in RAID5 and get the same space as two 4TB drives in RAID1.

If you want to stick with two drives, then you can rebuild a two drive array in RAID1:
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000005775/technologies.html
I've never touched RAID to be honest. So let me know if this rules it out, I don't want to install my OS on them and I don't want to have to have to finagle some sort of driver install part way through my OS install. I guess that's why I'm looking at software options. The RAID5 option sounds really cool, I really don't understand how it fills in the gaps if a drive dies but thats neat. The data I'm saving isn't life or death and so I'm going to skip that option simply due to the $$$.
 

DejaWiz

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I've never touched RAID to be honest. So let me know if this rules it out, I don't want to install my OS on them and I don't want to have to have to finagle some sort of driver install part way through my OS install. I guess that's why I'm looking at software options. The RAID5 option sounds really cool, I really don't understand how it fills in the gaps if a drive dies but thats neat. The data I'm saving isn't life or death and so I'm going to skip that option simply due to the $$$.

You can add the two drives onto available SATA ports (recommend you use the chipset native ports, instead of ports on a secondary controller if your system has additional ports run by a secondary controller, such as ASmedia).

Depending on your chipset, you may have to enable RAID in BIOS for those particular ports.

You may even have to use the RAID function in BIOS to select the RAID type and build the array by telling it which drives to add.

If you're on an Intel platform, the Rapid Storage Technology feature (if yours is capable) is the way to go, IMO.

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000005867/technologies.html

https://downloadcenter.intel.com/product/55005
 

SpongeBob

The Contraceptive Under the Sea
Joined
Jan 15, 2011
Messages
793
You can add the two drives onto available SATA ports (recommend you use the chipset native ports, instead of ports on a secondary controller if your system has additional ports run by a secondary controller, such as ASmedia).

Depending on your chipset, you may have to enable RAID in BIOS for those particular ports.

You may even have to use the RAID function in BIOS to select the RAID type and build the array by telling it which drives to add.

If you're on an Intel platform, the Rapid Storage Technology feature (if yours is capable) is the way to go, IMO.

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000005867/technologies.html

https://downloadcenter.intel.com/product/55005
"Intel Rapid Storage Technology is a Windows-based application that provides improved performance and reliability for systems equipped with SATA disks for desktop, mobile, and server platforms. When using one or multiple SATA disk drives, you can take advantage of enhanced performance and lower power consumption. When using more than one disk, you can increase protection against data loss in the event of disk failure."

So this is Intel's software based raid? Have you used this?
 
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