Is Windows 10 20H2 the worst windows yet?

ManofGod

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that is not comparable to running an office enviroment, hiring and training, and business software specific to industry(s). Switching to Linux would be such a massive headache and take time away from productive tasks, so No, Linux is not an option regardless of your opinion.

That entirely depends on the office environment itself. Many have decided to use Linux as a desktop environment in the business, most likely Fedora or RHEL but, many have decided to use Windows 10 and that is what it is. The real question is: Where will we be 10 years from now?
 

ManofGod

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having the same convo we have every 10 years; its "the year of linux", but not really.

Whether it is the year of Linux or not, I do not see Windows being the defacto for the rest of time. Therefore, the real question is, where will we be 10 years from now.
 

pendragon1

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Whether it is the year of Linux or not, I do not see Windows being the defacto for the rest of time. Therefore, the real question is, where will we be 10 years from now.
still on windows. linux on server side sure, but user side is a windows world.
 

ManofGod

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still on windows. linux on server side sure, but user side is a windows world.

We do not know that with absolute certainty. After all, how many here, 10 years ago, would have predicted that Microsoft pushed out a security update that broke printing and caused BSOD's well printing? Something as basic as that should not happen.
 

pendragon1

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We do not know that with absolute certainty. After all, how many here, 10 years ago, would have predicted that Microsoft pushed out a security update that broke printing and caused BSOD's well printing? Something as basic as that should not happen.
people been saying that shit since the 90s. im not surprised by glitches in os updates, ms or any other os. yeah, well it does happen and that example also wasnt universal.
 

B00nie

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that is not comparable to running an office enviroment, hiring and training, and business software specific to industry(s). Switching to Linux would be such a massive headache and take time away from productive tasks, so No, Linux is not an option regardless of your opinion.
How is linux so different to "operate". If you have a bunch of office pushers making spreadsheets and documents, they probably won't even know they're not on Windows.
 

ManofGod

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people been saying that shit since the 90s. im not surprised by glitches in os updates, ms or any other os. yeah, well it does happen and that example also wasnt universal.

That is not saying "shit", that is a straight up fact of what is actually occurring. I deal in objective, verifiable reality today and to be honest, most would not have said that it would occur 10 years later, since Windows 7 was more stable with updates, overall, then Windows 10 today.

This printing BSOD was not some minor little thing but something that should not have occurred, at all. Also, this error occurred quite a bit and it does not have to be universal in order for it to be significant and bad. Therefore, we simply do not know with certainty what will be in use in 10 years time but, I will be curious, nonetheless.
 

ManofGod

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lol, hasnt happened yet. seems to be an alternate reality of some sort based on your responses.

Can you show me evidence that the printing BSOD is not happened yet? Also, I have been in this for 30 years and so I would think my point of view is quite valid.
 

Aireoth

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How is linux so different to "operate". If you have a bunch of office pushers making spreadsheets and documents, they probably won't even know they're not on Windows.

Out of the 6 different programs that are critical to running my office, only one is on Linux. The 6 program are fairly industry standard so I can hire anyone who works in the industry and they will have a baseline knowledge of how the program works and is used. I don't even know if there is a Linux substitute for those programs. If there is I can guarantee you I will need to train at least 70% of the people that I hire to use it.

Second, like many here, you overestimate the general publics computer knowledge and think because granny uses it for very very basic tasks anyone can.

Third, I don't live in a hightech hub, most people on the street here don't do much with computers daily, their tech life is largely limited to IOS and what their job forces them to use.

So no, Linux is and never will be an option.

The only way Windows dies, is if it is replaced with some form of an IOS. Since everyone is familiar and function on a phone, so you can expect any given employee to be 100% capable of navigating the IOS off the street.

This is a fundamental problem with Tech people, you always, ALWAYS, over assume the capability of the average person. With Linux people, you always over assume the compatibility of applications.

Edit: Why is it everytime people talk OS, there are a few people that insist on making everything about Linux. It would piss me off, but I'll just go play a few games to blow of Steam lol.
 
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pendragon1

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Can you show me evidence that the printing BSOD is not happened yet? Also, I have been in this for 30 years and so I would think my point of view is quite valid.
i never said it didnt happen, i said it wasnt an universal problem. wow, so about the same time as me then....
 

ManofGod

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i never said it didnt happen, i said it wasnt an universal problem. wow, so about the same time as me then....

Yes but, not being a universal problem is not particularly relevant, especially for such a significant problem. Oh, and I guess we are showing our age. :)
 

vegeta535

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Never had a issue with any of the windows 10 updates. Just today my work laptop finally got 1909 pushed to it!
 

Lunar

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Whether it is the year of Linux or not, I do not see Windows being the defacto for the rest of time. Therefore, the real question is, where will we be 10 years from now.
If the big tech firms have their way I think the vision for the future is no more personal computers. Everything will be in the cloud accessed via glorified thin client terminals. As web apps become more and more dominate I think this is the future we are headed towards. As far as real PC applications are concerned, I think 10 years from now all of that work will be done on virtual machines in datacenters. Several companies are already moving towards this type of infrastructure for the cost savings. I think the consumer version of this will take the form of Windows 10X and Chromebooks. Devices that on their own can perform most tasks average users will need, but will also offer a virtualized desktop in the cload for demanding workloads.

Outside of people like us that are enthusiasts, who actually needs a computer at home these days for anything other than gaming or work? I know that when a non-enthusiast asks me what they should get for a computer, I more often than not just tell them to get an iPad and a keyboard cover for it. I've had several friends, co-workers, and family members go this route, and they all thanked me for it. As much as I don't like it, the average person just doesn't need a PC at home anymore. Me personally, they can pry my PC from my cold dead hands.
 

ManofGod

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If the big tech firms have their way I think the vision for the future is no more personal computers. Everything will be in the cloud accessed via glorified thin client terminals. As web apps become more and more dominate I think this is the future we are headed towards. As far as real PC applications are concerned, I think 10 years from now all of that work will be done on virtual machines in datacenters. Several companies are already moving towards this type of infrastructure for the cost savings. I think the consumer version of this will take the form of Windows 10X and Chromebooks. Devices that on their own can perform most tasks average users will need, but will also offer a virtualized desktop in the cload for demanding workloads.

Outside of people like us that are enthusiasts, who actually needs a computer at home these days for anything other than gaming or work? I know that when a non-enthusiast asks me what they should get for a computer, I more often than not just tell them to get an iPad and a keyboard cover for it. I've had several friends, co-workers, and family members go this route, and they all thanked me for it. As much as I don't like it, the average person just doesn't need a PC at home anymore. Me personally, they can pry my PC from my cold dead hands.

You sent them to an IPad? You had the opportunity to get them on the PC train and building computers but instead, they are now doing mindless consumption on a daily basis. I think that having them go the way of doing it themselves will benefit them and the PC community at large over just using a phone with a somewhat bigger screen.
 

Lunar

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You sent them to an IPad? You had the opportunity to get them on the PC train and building computers but instead, they are now doing mindless consumption on a daily basis. I think that having them go the way of doing it themselves will benefit them and the PC community at large over just using a phone with a somewhat bigger screen.
Doubtful. The truth of the matter is most people have no desire to learn how computers actually work, how to fix/maintain them, or how to build them. I understand the sentiment, but it just isn't realistic. Also, that argument is similar to saying that people shouldn't buy cars from manufacturers anymore, they should just assemble them from kits. It's pie in the sky and unrealistic. People have different interests and specialties. We are a group of people who are computer enthusiasts and have spent the time and energy to learn as much as we can about them. The same is true for other people who focus on other skill sets. Not everyone can be a computer expert, nor do they want to be.

Plus, what would be more beneficial in my opinion would not be getting everyone to learn to build their own computers, but instead to focus on and learn about security while using connected devices. Learn about how companies are using free services as a way to incentivize people to use those services so they can then profit from personal information. Get people to stop buying and using IOT devices because it's "cool". Help them understand the inherit risk of putting every damn thing we can on the internet. I mean, why in the hell is there a wifi enabled Crockpot? Why? Raising awareness of issues like that amongst the general populace would be much more beneficial, and far more realistic of a goal.

WiFi enabled crockpot because we just can't help ourselves. IOT reminds me of a quote from Jurassic Park that is very applicable.
Yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should. -Dr. Ian Malcolm
 

ManofGod

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Doubtful. The truth of the matter is most people have no desire to learn how computers actually work, how to fix/maintain them, or how to build them. I understand the sentiment, but it just isn't realistic. Also, that argument is similar to saying that people shouldn't buy cars from manufacturers anymore, they should just assemble them from kits. It's pie in the sky and unrealistic. People have different interests and specialties. We are a group of people who are computer enthusiasts and have spent the time and energy to learn as much as we can about them. The same is true for other people who focus on other skill sets. Not everyone can be a computer expert, nor do they want to be.

Plus, what would be more beneficial in my opinion would not be getting everyone to learn to build their own computers, but instead to focus on and learn about security while using connected devices. Learn about how companies are using free services as a way to incentivize people to use those services so they can then profit from personal information. Get people to stop buying and using IOT devices because it's "cool". Help them understand the inherit risk of putting every damn thing we can on the internet. I mean, why in the hell is there a wifi enabled Crockpot? Why? Raising awareness of issues like that amongst the general populace would be much more beneficial, and far more realistic of a goal.

WiFi enabled crockpot because we just can't help ourselves. IOT reminds me of a quote from Jurassic Park that is very applicable.

I just knew you would bring up the car comparison but, they are not even remotely similar in scope or purpose. Not even kit cars are the same as assembling a PC and then enjoying what you took the time to bring to life. (Truth is, most folks appreciate things more when they did it themselves.)

Also, in my opinion, you would be raising awareness of security and privacy by having a person building a PC themselves. (Or, at least once Videocard pricing goes back to normal.) You do not need to be an expert to do this sort of stuff.
 

mvmiller12

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I just knew you would bring up the car comparison but, they are not even remotely similar in scope or purpose. Not even kit cars are the same as assembling a PC and then enjoying what you took the time to bring to life. (Truth is, most folks appreciate things more when they did it themselves.)

Also, in my opinion, you would be raising awareness of security and privacy by having a person building a PC themselves. (Or, at least once Videocard pricing goes back to normal.) You do not need to be an expert to do this sort of stuff.

My experience is that most people just don't care. I do, but that enthusiasm is only contagious to those who were already at least a bit interested, and sadly, that just is not (relatively) a lot of folks.
 

Lunar

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I just knew you would bring up the car comparison but, they are not even remotely similar in scope or purpose. Not even kit cars are the same as assembling a PC and then enjoying what you took the time to bring to life. (Truth is, most folks appreciate things more when they did it themselves.)

Also, in my opinion, you would be raising awareness of security and privacy by having a person building a PC themselves. (Or, at least once Videocard pricing goes back to normal.) You do not need to be an expert to do this sort of stuff.
Sure, you don't need to be an expert until it doesn't work and you have to start troubleshooting. The biggest problem I have with the arguments for everyone building their own PC is what seems to be the assumption that everything will just work fine. But what about when said person builds the PC and it fails to post? Don't like my point about cars? Fine. How about everyone fix their own plumbing? Replace their own windows? Troubleshoot their own appliances such as recharging their refrigerator or fixing their washing machine?

All of these things are absolutely within the grasp of your average homeowner, but not everyone has the skills, ability, desire, or any other multitude of reasons why they don't do these things. As such, we have people who are experts in performing these types of tasks. Personally, I do a lot of the things I just listed, but I chose to put forth the effort to learn how to do those things. That being said, I do have my own limits. Take plumbing for example. I'm able/willing to fix just about anything plumbing related up until the point the problem is in the piping in the wall. At that point the job has exceeded my skill-set, and the risk of causing more harm results in me calling a plumber who has the knowledge and experience to fix the issue. Would the world be a better place if people were more self sufficient in all things? Yeah, probably, but yet again. Unrealistic.

As far as people learning to build PC's helping them understand security. No. Not even a little. Learning how to assemble a PC successfully will do little to nothing in helping people understand security. At the end of the day a novice who successfully builds a PC will be staring at the same Windows desktop, and most likely perform the same insecure tasks they would've done on any other device that can access the web. Building a PC does not generate good computing habits. Might open the door to that kind of thinking, but most likely not. To do that you'd need to illustrate to them the problems with privacy and security in a way that relates to them individually. Until they see how it directly impacts them, they are unlikely to care enough to make a change in the way they use technology.

EDIT: One thing I do agree with you on is the satisfaction in building something. I do agree that most people feel that way when achieving something. But yet again that is a very personal type of satisfaction typically achieved by someone completing something they actually cared about completing in the first place.
 

B00nie

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Out of the 6 different programs that are critical to running my office, only one is on Linux. The 6 program are fairly industry standard so I can hire anyone who works in the industry and they will have a baseline knowledge of how the program works and is used. I don't even know if there is a Linux substitute for those programs. If there is I can guarantee you I will need to train at least 70% of the people that I hire to use it.

Second, like many here, you overestimate the general publics computer knowledge and think because granny uses it for very very basic tasks anyone can.

Third, I don't live in a hightech hub, most people on the street here don't do much with computers daily, their tech life is largely limited to IOS and what their job forces them to use.

So no, Linux is and never will be an option.

The only way Windows dies, is if it is replaced with some form of an IOS. Since everyone is familiar and function on a phone, so you can expect any given employee to be 100% capable of navigating the IOS off the street.

This is a fundamental problem with Tech people, you always, ALWAYS, over assume the capability of the average person. With Linux people, you always over assume the compatibility of applications.

Edit: Why is it everytime people talk OS, there are a few people that insist on making everything about Linux. It would piss me off, but I'll just go play a few games to blow of Steam lol.
Have you even tried if those programs run on Wine? Most programs do. And there was an experiment where they pulled random people from the street and showed a linux desktop, claiming it's the new version of Windows. People were like wow, really cool. You have a serious case of prejudice. But your loss of course :D

My 70+ year old non computer savvy in-laws use their linux desktops happily every day after I set it up for them. Have been doing so for 8+ years now. I would get embarrassed to say an elderly person is more computer savvy than me. They and my mother always asked me to check their windows when I visited because ALWAYS there was some malware infection or other problem that needed fixing. So I moved them to linux and I haven't had to fix anything with their laptops for years. All I do is a version upgrade every couple years.
 

jardows

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Sure, you don't need to be an expert until it doesn't work and you have to start troubleshooting. The biggest problem I have with the arguments for everyone building their own PC is what seems to be the assumption that everything will just work fine. But what about when said person builds the PC and it fails to post? Don't like my point about cars? Fine. How about everyone fix their own plumbing? Replace their own windows? Troubleshoot their own appliances such as recharging their refrigerator or fixing their washing machine?

All of these things are absolutely within the grasp of your average homeowner, but not everyone has the skills, ability, desire, or any other multitude of reasons why they don't do these things. As such, we have people who are experts in performing these types of tasks. Personally, I do a lot of the things I just listed, but I chose to put forth the effort to learn how to do those things. That being said, I do have my own limits. Take plumbing for example. I'm able/willing to fix just about anything plumbing related up until the point the problem is in the piping in the wall. At that point the job has exceeded my skill-set, and the risk of causing more harm results in me calling a plumber who has the knowledge and experience to fix the issue. Would the world be a better place if people were more self sufficient in all things? Yeah, probably, but yet again. Unrealistic.

As far as people learning to build PC's helping them understand security. No. Not even a little. Learning how to assemble a PC successfully will do little to nothing in helping people understand security. At the end of the day a novice who successfully builds a PC will be staring at the same Windows desktop, and most likely perform the same insecure tasks they would've done on any other device that can access the web. Building a PC does not generate good computing habits. Might open the door to that kind of thinking, but most likely not. To do that you'd need to illustrate to them the problems with privacy and security in a way that relates to them individually. Until they see how it directly impacts them, they are unlikely to care enough to make a change in the way they use technology.

EDIT: One thing I do agree with you on is the satisfaction in building something. I do agree that most people feel that way when achieving something. But yet again that is a very personal type of satisfaction typically achieved by someone completing something they actually cared about completing in the first place.
One of the reasons I like FreeBSD. In order to properly use the system, you have to know the system. It'll always be a minority OS because of that as it really takes "computer people" to properly appreciate and operate, but when things don't go according to plan, I have a foundation to figure it out and fix it. When something goes wrong with Windows or MacOS, it's typically much faster to just re-install the OS, because the underlying causes are hidden behind so many layers of complexity. Thankfully I have had very few problems with my personal Windows computers.
 

mvmiller12

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Have you even tried if those programs run on Wine? Most programs do. And there was an experiment where they pulled random people from the street and showed a linux desktop, claiming it's the new version of Windows. People were like wow, really cool. You have a serious case of prejudice. But your loss of course :D

My 70+ year old non computer savvy in-laws use their linux desktops happily every day after I set it up for them. Have been doing so for 8+ years now. I would get embarrassed to say an elderly person is more computer savvy than me. They and my mother always asked me to check their windows when I visited because ALWAYS there was some malware infection or other problem that needed fixing. So I moved them to linux and I haven't had to fix anything with their laptops for years. All I do is a version upgrade every couple years.

I would like to point out, that in all fairness, you yourself are performing the maintenance on those computers. It may very well be that that maintenance is easier and cleaner for you since they are running on a Linux that you yourself set up. It is also likely true that they themselves would be almost certainly be unable to perform any maintenance on such a set up themselves, and would also be very unlikely to successfully install any Windows app utilizing WINE they might need on their own.

For better or worse, the problems you outlined with Windows above (i.e. viruses and malware) are a result of Windows being very easy to install software on. By default, pretty much anybody can install anything with little effort unless the system is specifically locked down (such as forcing users to NOT use an Admin account). It is this very ease of use that has made Windows "popular (?)" amongst the masses, and every time Microsoft makes moves to limit this freedom, they catch a LOT of shit for it. Whether or not most users can actually be trusted with that level of authority on their systems is an entirely different discussion altogether, but... "it's a feature, not a bug" applies here.
 

Aireoth

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Have you even tried if those programs run on Wine? Most programs do. And there was an experiment where they pulled random people from the street and showed a linux desktop, claiming it's the new version of Windows. People were like wow, really cool. You have a serious case of prejudice. But your loss of course :D

My 70+ year old non computer savvy in-laws use their linux desktops happily every day after I set it up for them. Have been doing so for 8+ years now. I would get embarrassed to say an elderly person is more computer savvy than me. They and my mother always asked me to check their windows when I visited because ALWAYS there was some malware infection or other problem that needed fixing. So I moved them to linux and I haven't had to fix anything with their laptops for years. All I do is a version upgrade every couple years.

Linux evagelists, yeesh. Your not going to succeed, its manifold more likely I'd migrate to Macs before migrate to Linux and that will never happen.

So Listen up, the system must run as people expect, it must be compatible with industry software (and if you've had any lick of experience with industry software, which i doubt by your post, you'd know its often legacy and incompatible, heck one particular program needs to utilize internet explorer, nothing else will do), it must be future compatible with whatever industry garbage gets pumped out, and personally it needs to run any and everything I throw at it. Pre-covid we did after hours lan parties with the younger staff, again a strike against linux. I will not waste time messing around with a system like linux that may run it, but may not, go to google to troubleshoot compatibility, or jump through xyz hoop, any and all of that is time away from better pursuits.

your grandma doesn't count for anything as she is a personal user, not business.

Also haven't had a single problem with malware or viruses in W10, just don't give them the admin account, make sure updates get deployed and run an AV just in case.
 

B00nie

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I would like to point out, that in all fairness, you yourself are performing the maintenance on those computers. It may very well be that that maintenance is easier and cleaner for you since they are running on a Linux that you yourself set up. It is also likely true that they themselves would be almost certainly be unable to perform any maintenance on such a set up themselves, and would also be very unlikely to successfully install any Windows app utilizing WINE they might need on their own.

For better or worse, the problems you outlined with Windows above (i.e. viruses and malware) are a result of Windows being very easy to install software on. By default, pretty much anybody can install anything with little effort unless the system is specifically locked down (such as forcing users to NOT use an Admin account). It is this very ease of use that has made Windows "popular (?)" amongst the masses, and every time Microsoft makes moves to limit this freedom, they catch a LOT of shit for it. Whether or not most users can actually be trusted with that level of authority on their systems is an entirely different discussion altogether, but... "it's a feature, not a bug" applies here.
That's exactly the point. Once linux is set up, it does _not_ require maintenance. The endless calls for help from my mother ended when I switched her to linux. She was also badly conditioned to believe she must use Windows and we had a fight about it. But then I showed her that all her familiar things were available just like they used to and now she even asks me to install linux again if she upgrades her laptop.
 

B00nie

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Linux evagelists, yeesh. Your not going to succeed, its manifold more likely I'd migrate to Macs before migrate to Linux and that will never happen.

So Listen up, the system must run as people expect, it must be compatible with industry software (and if you've had any lick of experience with industry software, which i doubt by your post, you'd know its often legacy and incompatible, heck one particular program needs to utilize internet explorer, nothing else will do), it must be future compatible with whatever industry garbage gets pumped out, and personally it needs to run any and everything I throw at it. Pre-covid we did after hours lan parties with the younger staff, again a strike against linux. I will not waste time messing around with a system like linux that may run it, but may not, go to google to troubleshoot compatibility, or jump through xyz hoop, any and all of that is time away from better pursuits.

your grandma doesn't count for anything as she is a personal user, not business.

Also haven't had a single problem with malware or viruses in W10, just don't give them the admin account, make sure updates get deployed and run an AV just in case.
LOL macs are way too expensive for an average user to use. It will never happen.

So Listen up. It's extremely simple to install any version of IE, some ancient 32-bit libraries and whatnot to Wine on a linux. Try doing that on a Windows! So there's a higher possibility that those legacy business applications run on Wine than they do on Windows 10. You just have no experience and you live in a Microsoft bubble.

What you're saying essentially that you're satisfied being conditioned to your daily bowl of gruel and you're not ready to learn how to fry a nice beef steak. Oh noes, I have to Google something. News flash: You do that with Windows also for sure.

By the way, what makes you think you can't do a lan party with a bunch of linux boxes? Do you think linux has no networking? It only runs the entire internet you know.
 

Aireoth

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LOL macs are way too expensive for an average user to use. It will never happen.

So Listen up. It's extremely simple to install any version of IE, some ancient 32-bit libraries and whatnot to Wine on a linux. Try doing that on a Windows! So there's a higher possibility that those legacy business applications run on Wine than they do on Windows 10. You just have no experience and you live in a Microsoft bubble.

What you're saying essentially that you're satisfied being conditioned to your daily bowl of gruel and you're not ready to learn how to fry a nice beef steak. Oh noes, I have to Google something. News flash: You do that with Windows also for sure.

By the way, what makes you think you can't do a lan party with a bunch of linux boxes? Do you think linux has no networking? It only runs the entire internet you know.
Again, linux evanglists. You people don't know when you've lost.

Stop telling me what you don't know. Stop denying my experience. W10 has been perfect, I literally couldn't ask for more at this point. No BSODs without failing hardware, great virus protection, it simply works in a way most windows do not. Since windows 10 I haven't had to do shit for googling, it just works.

Linux and gaming, its come a long way, but its still a joke on comparison.
 
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B00nie

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Again, linux evanglists. You people don't know when you've lost.

Stop telling me what you don't know. Stop denying my experience. W10 has been perfect, I literally couldn't ask for more at this point. No BSODs without failing hardware, great virus protection, it simply works in a way most windows do not. Since windows 10 I haven't had to do shit for googling, it just works.

Linux and gaming, its come a long way, but its still a joke on comparison.
Again, windows zealots. You are pleased to your position as Microsofts peasant and you're not willing to learn anything new. Windows 10 'just working' is quite a joke when we watch the posts on this forum alone, let alone globally :ROFLMAO:
 

Aireoth

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Again, windows zealots. You are pleased to your position as Microsofts peasant and you're not willing to learn anything new. Windows 10 'just working' is quite a joke when we watch the posts on this forum alone, let alone globally :ROFLMAO:

Says the guy who is more wrong than right on these forums. bye.

Denying others experience will never win you anything.
 

mvmiller12

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That's exactly the point. Once linux is set up, it does _not_ require maintenance. The endless calls for help from my mother ended when I switched her to linux. She was also badly conditioned to believe she must use Windows and we had a fight about it. But then I showed her that all her familiar things were available just like they used to and now she even asks me to install linux again if she upgrades her laptop.

If Linux requires no maintenance, then why does apt-get update on my Raspberry Pi keep finding things that need to be updated? I can completely understand eschewing new features, but are you seriously just leaving security holes unpatched??

Edit: The last general purpose computers I purchased that require no maintenance were TRS-80 Color Computers, an Atari 800XL, and an Apple //c and Apple IIgs. (and I still have all of those other than the Atari).
 

B00nie

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If Linux requires no maintenance, then why does apt-get update on my Raspberry Pi keep finding things that need to be updated? I can completely understand eschewing new features, but are you seriously just leaving security holes unpatched??

Edit: The last general purpose computers I purchased that require no maintenance were TRS-80 Color Computers, an Atari 800XL, and an Apple //c and Apple IIgs. (and I still have all of those other than the Atari).
The updates can be automated easily. The fact remains that on windows I got a call on average every 2 weeks, on linux I do a basic maintenance once a year. Saves a lot of pain off my back.
 

B00nie

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Says the guy who is more wrong than right on these forums. bye.

Denying others experience will never win you anything.
I'm willing to call your bullshit. Where was I wrong exactly? And don't continue the pathetic language change argument as the majority of OEM installs where I live are single language versions.
 

Aireoth

Supreme [H]ardness
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Oct 12, 2005
Messages
5,440
The updates can be automated easily. The fact remains that on windows I got a call on average every 2 weeks, on linux I do a basic maintenance once a year. Saves a lot of pain off my back.
You undestand statistics right?

Most people use windows (~70%), ergo most calls will be on windows. Now factor in that outside of select cases most linux users are going to be more tech savvy than most windows users. Pretty sure you can see where your anecdotal evidence falls apart from there.
 

pendragon1

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Oct 7, 2000
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You undestand statistics right?

Most people use windows (~70%), ergo most calls will be on windows. Now factor in that outside of select cases most linux users are going to be more tech savvy than most windows users. Pretty sure you can see where your anecdotal evidence falls apart from there.
he doesnt. all this linux linux linux talk from him and he uses a mac and has to google linux problems. lol. also, not sure of anywhere except offline stand alone specialty productions systems that only yearly updating is ok.
 
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