I microwaved a R9 390X gaming and now my pc won't run after 3rd time

travm

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A PSU tester with some other stuff like a voltmeter and additional parts to test and see which won't work would be enough to get the results.
This is not correct. You will need a new motherboard to test your CPU and Ram. the GPU is dead. Period. Not fixable. The motherboard is Dead. Period, full stop. Not fixable.
 

princeboy47

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At this point, you've destroyed the GPU beyond repair. Probably the motherboard is beyond repair as well, and I wouldn't touch the PSU after you stuck that paperclip in all its holes.

Maybe the CPU is reusable, Dan_D says they're tough, and your storage is probably OK.
We currently having trouble to see if all is destroyed or not. That's why I am to get a technician and see what we can dig up from this. Surely mistakes are all related first and last to the GPU but as I mentioned that MB and PSU won't work together, which makes things more difficult to decide what happened with high certainty.
 

travm

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We currently having trouble to see if all is destroyed or not. That's why I am to get a technician and see what we can dig up from this. Surely mistakes are all related first and last to the GPU but as I mentioned that MB and PSU won't work together, which makes things more difficult to decide what happened with high certainty.
High certainty is your motherboard was destroyed by powering it on while a destroyed GPU was installed. Your CPU and ram may work in another motherboard. 2/3's of the posts in this thread are telling you that. just wow.
 

Halon

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High certainty is your motherboard was destroyed by powering it on while a destroyed GPU was installed. Your CPU and ram may work in another motherboard. 2/3's of the posts in this thread are telling you that. just wow.
Please listen to travm, OP. Stop pretending anything else is true.
 

notarat

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The point is all what I'm looking up now is to collect what is damaged and try to repair it, whether through me or a geek store that has such fine repairman for GPUs.

Here are two scenarios. (The second one is far more likely to succeed)

1 -- You repairing what you broke.
2 -- Me, taking a poop and putting the poop back into my butt.
 

hititnquitit

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I think its beyond obvious that this dudes level of comprehension is well below that of the norm. We should just step away at this point. This is a one sided conversation.
 

vegeta535

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All right. Let's break this down nice 'n' small. The graphics card was overheating and throttling, which will tank your performance. That was either due to the need for new thermal compound, or possibly a fan malfunction.

But that's not really germane, seeing as you took the problematic card, threw it into a microwave because you didn't know how they work and assumed it'd be just like a toaster oven, and then took the fried hardware and put it back into your computer, where at minimum it fried the motherboard. And now you've ignored the decades of cumulative experience in this thread all telling you that those two pieces of hardware are dead. And because the power supply is not supplying power to something that's obviously toast, you are now trying to force the power supply into delivering current. STOP. You've already killed two pieces of previously working hardware. The power supply can actually seriously wound or kill you if you're reckless. The whole thing is NOT full of probabilities. Just STOP.
I think it is time we justlet natural selection run its course here. This guy must be related to Lucky75.
 
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travm

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I think its beyond obvious that this dudes level of comprehension is well below that of the norm. We should just step away at this point. This is a one sided conversation.
it always boggles my mind when threads like this pop up here and on other boards. The fact that a person can think that they know or understand better than 10 or 20 other knowledgable people who are all saying exactly the same thing, and then the walk away with a statement like "I think i'll get a second opinion". Reminds me of an old freinds dog, it got fed some food that had been warmed up, made too hot, it burned its mouth. So it barked at the food bowl for 20 minutes like it was going to kill it.
 

michalrz

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If you find a shop or person who's willing to repair your card, you need to tell him about the microwave and subsequent power on.

Anything less is wrong. Don't send an innocent serviceman on a wild goose chase trying to find a logical explanation of why several independent areas of the card died.
 

princeboy47

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Does anyone know what the L1002 is?

20210420_214600.jpg
 

michalrz

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Like travm said - inductor.
Kind of proves the point we're trying to make.
And before you ask - no, that's not the only inductor. And before you ask about replacing all inductors - zig-zagging PCB traces are also inductors and could have also absorbed and then shot out a spark of high voltage somewhere else.

Edit: also, see those little brown blocks with "C" marked beside them? Those are capacitors. They most likely became charged to absurdly high voltages.
When you connected the card into the mobo, they probably discharged themselves through the motherboard's components, breaking them.

Edit 2nd: and then there's the 'dead man walking' effect of electric zaps. Transistors become partially damaged. Sometimes x-raying them will show this. A zapped transistor may work an hour, a month, or 5 minutes. They are no longer usable, because you can't really test for that.
 
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travm

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To put this in perspective, OP, who cannot distinguish the difference between a resistance oven (typical cooking oven) and a microwave, is now trying to troubleshoot two completely destroyed electrical assemblies component by component, using trial and error. I hope he doesnt live in an apartment building where his negligence may cause countless others to die in the inevitable fire.
 

princeboy47

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Like travm said - inductor.
Kind of proves the point we're trying to make.
And before you ask - no, that's not the only inductor. And before you ask about replacing all inductors - zig-zagging PCB traces are also inductors and could have also absorbed and then shot out a spark of high voltage somewhere else.

Edit: also, see those little brown blocks with "C" marked beside them? Those are capacitors. They most likely became charged to absurdly high voltages.
When you connected the card into the mobo, they probably discharged themselves through the motherboard's components, breaking them.
Not exactly, what do inductors do?
 

michalrz

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Not exactly, what do inductors do?
Die in the presence of microwaves, apparently.

Well, in your case they absorbed energy by creating an electromagnetic field around themselves, and then instantly dumped that energy as soon as surrounding traces and components were less energized.

That kept happening millions of times in random places on your card.
 

Sir Beregond

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Currently we have another issue after what they all say toasting it.
You do realize that when they said this, a microwave was not the intended appliance to accomplish this, right? Please tell me you know microwaves and ovens do not work the same way. Hell even a toaster oven should have been preferable to a damn microwave.
 

criccio

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To put this in perspective, OP, who cannot distinguish the difference between a resistance oven (typical cooking oven) and a microwave, is now trying to troubleshoot two completely destroyed electrical assemblies component by component, using trial and error. I hope he doesnt live in an apartment building where his negligence may cause countless others to die in the inevitable fire.
Or, he's performing the troll of the century.
 

travm

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Not exactly, what do inductors do?
Yes exactly. That statement was 100% factual. So are all the following statements.
In short, inductors dont like being microwaved, and they cause all sorts of damage to everything around them. Among other electronic components that dislike being microwaved.
 

cpufrost

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Inductors are little antennas which induce a current when electromagnetic waves are present (as in a microwave), or emit electromagnetic waves when current is passed through them.
They are smaller versions of the turbo encabulator but the microwaves can cause severe duractance and cascade failures. Watch out for avalanche diodes too! :-P
 

travm

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Edit 2nd: and then there's the 'dead man walking' effect of electric zaps. Transistors become partially damaged. Sometimes x-raying them will show this. A zapped transistor may work an hour, a month, or 5 minutes. They are no longer usable, because you can't really test for that.
This is my concern for his CPU and even the PSU. I'm not entirely sure how directly connected the PCIe lanes are between the mobo port and the CPU, and what inbuilt protections there are. I'm sure theres some protection, like for when people stick paper clips into things to see what happens. I'm sure a good engineer somewhere thought, what happens if.... and then designed some safety into the system, but I dont know.
 
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princeboy47

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So you are saying that changing some parts, if found, that got burnt in the microwave in the gpu wouldn't make it work again..?
 

Nobu

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So you are saying that changing some parts, if found, that got burnt in the microwave in the gpu wouldn't make it work again..?
If you replaced ALL the dead parts, all at once, then it might work. But the GPU itself may be dead. Is probably dead, in fact.
 

travm

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So you are saying that changing some parts, if found, that got burnt in the microwave in the gpu wouldn't make it work again..?
You're not understanding the extent of the damage here. Your looking for things that are damaged on the outside. The bits that make them work are on the inside, and the microwave DESTROYED them. This includes; Every inductor on the board, your screenshot of L1002, the L signifies "inductor", the 1002 means, this is fucking inductor # 1002, there are most likely 1001 other inductors on this board, a few will be large power inductors like #1002, but most will be very teeny tiny signal inductors. They are all smoked. Every transistor that was connected to any of these inductors is also dead. Some of these transistors will be inside the GPU die itself. Some of these parts (the gpu die) are not available to you for purchase (if they were they would also be prohibitively expensive). Some of these parts are so small they can only be reliably installed by robots. Capacitors and anything connected to them are likely mostly dead as well.

I would guess that most (not all, but most) of the resistors are still ok... but this means nothing because everything else is dead.

its not about changing "some" parts. Its more like changing almost all of the parts, and no you, nor I, nor any other person can fix this. RazorWind (this guy actually repairs broken GPU's) can you lend some weight to this? This GPU is dead, not fixable. By anyone. Someone might buy it off you for the fans, or to use as part of an fancy coffee table, but it will never render pixels again.
 

CaptNumbNutz

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RazorWind

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Thanks. I am serious.
Serious question: Where are you located? If you're in Central Texas somewhere, I'd be willing to look at that motherboard. I'd say there's about a 50/50 chance it's salvageable by someone who knows what he or she is doing.

The graphics card is mega-toasted, though. The damage to the 3.3V input pins alone means you're never getting that to work in a normal PCI-E slot again, regardless of what's wrong with the rest of it.

Inductors are little antennas which induce a current when electromagnetic waves are present (as in a microwave), or emit electromagnetic waves when current is passed through them.
In this context, it's more appropriate to think of them as energy storage devices. They store energy by building up an electric field when current is passed through them, and then releasing it as a voltage in the opposite direction when the current is stopped and the field collapses.

The one he asked about appears to be in series with one of the input rails, so it's probably just used for noise suppression, but if that one looks like that on the outside, they probably all do. If they got hot enough to discolor, the varnish that isolates the wire coils inside of them is likely burned away or melted, making them just sort of blob-shaped wires and not inductors anymore.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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This has to be trolling.

No way anyone sticks any PCB in a microwave.

Even the regular oven trick is risky, and should only be done on a bare board with heatsinks and everything else removed. (might be worth it though to have a small percentage chance of saving an otherwise dying board.)

There is no way microwaving a video card was ever going to have any other result than killing the video card, and having a very high chance of killing the entire PC if installed and powered up.
 
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