I microwaved a R9 390X gaming and now my pc won't run after 3rd time

princeboy47

Limp Gawd
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
169
Hello guys. Sorry for the delay...

Good news, the whole thing here, and the PC, is completely good. The only problem they found is a small scratch on the mobo I/O chip that caused two pins to be touched. Yup, I think you would say oops. So nothing was damaged.
Furthermore, the graphics card is still being checked. It's not running.
However, the graphics card is missing two connectors. The plastic pins covering is simply not on the card at all. And it is missing the RGB side light plug head, cut. Other than that, microwave, I remember, had heated around the edges of the metal graphics card pins on the pcb, the 6 and 8-pin connectors I mean. And also around the interface sockets. And I remember something had melted on the microwave Glass tray from the graphics card, which led to breaking it recently due to having it heated several times while on the microwave tray. I am not sure if the molten thread is metal or not so it has caused something like that. However, I think I will wait for sometime until I get a call back..
So no worries here...
 

Nobu

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jun 7, 2007
Messages
6,176
Woo! Dodged a bullet on the MB. I'd have still parted it out and sold or kept as a backup. Call me skeptical. lol
 

Hakaba

Gawd
Joined
Jul 22, 2013
Messages
934
1 Microwaved graphics card for few minutes, because it has the overheating issues.
2 Plastic around pins were melted and some plugs around interface sockets, the metal part, had some burning coming out.
3 Removed the graphics card, installed it, failed to show anything on the display at all.
4 3rd time PC won't even turn on as in power. The ethernet LED was lit.
4 Tried that again with unplugging cables and having one RAM only in the PC and only the main SSD
5 Now the PC won't turn on at all, ethernet LED is not turning on.
6 tried couple of tricks from the internet to turn it on like have a screw driver on both power switch pins but nothing happens.
7 HELP !!!

I really hope you used a microwave that is 3000W or higher. If not, what most likely happened is that the longer cook time caused the turbo encabulator magnetic seals to weaken, which led blue smoke escaping the vacuum sealed chambers. When this happens you generally have to desolder the GPU die (since it is located directly under it) and replace it with one from the same generation. I would recommend a Dyson hairdryer, it is cheaper than a hot air station but not as effective. However, it will get the job done, and make sure you get the three prong version, it is able to dissipate ESD. Unlike its two prong counterpart.

Reassembly is pretty straight forward. The only difficult part with be re-balling the GPU die. Now they make templates for some dies, which allows you to drop the lead based solder balls into the correct position. However, if you re unlucky and have to design your own, you can use a 3D printer or a 3D printing pen (a lot cheaper, but harder to deal with). After that, if you have a hot air station you can just heat it up till everything flows and seats and your done! The other way is to use a Coleman induction heater, small iron pipe (to transfer the heat to the die). But you cannot crank it to max without breaking something. So, use some painters tape to hold it down (doesn’t leave any residue behind), flip it upside down and balance it on the iron pipe, set it to mediums. Set the dyson blower to low, and just sweep back and forth on the reverse side of the socket.

That is only for the GPU die itself, since I never replaced a turbo encabulator before, it’s best to Google it and see how others have done it. I would hate for you to follow only my steps and break something.

Good Luck!
 

criccio

Fully Equipped
Joined
Mar 26, 2008
Messages
13,838
I really hope you used a microwave that is 3000W or higher. If not, what most likely happened is that the longer cook time caused the turbo encabulator magnetic seals to weaken, which led blue smoke escaping the vacuum sealed chambers. When this happens you generally have to desolder the GPU die (since it is located directly under it) and replace it with one from the same generation. I would recommend a Dyson hairdryer, it is cheaper than a hot air station but not as effective. However, it will get the job done, and make sure you get the three prong version, it is able to dissipate ESD. Unlike its two prong counterpart.

Reassembly is pretty straight forward. The only difficult part with be re-balling the GPU die. Now they make templates for some dies, which allows you to drop the lead based solder balls into the correct position. However, if you re unlucky and have to design your own, you can use a 3D printer or a 3D printing pen (a lot cheaper, but harder to deal with). After that, if you have a hot air station you can just heat it up till everything flows and seats and your done! The other way is to use a Coleman induction heater, small iron pipe (to transfer the heat to the die). But you cannot crank it to max without breaking something. So, use some painters tape to hold it down (doesn’t leave any residue behind), flip it upside down and balance it on the iron pipe, set it to mediums. Set the dyson blower to low, and just sweep back and forth on the reverse side of the socket.

That is only for the GPU die itself, since I never replaced a turbo encabulator before, it’s best to Google it and see how others have done it. I would hate for you to follow only my steps and break something.

Good Luck!
You sir are a national treasure.
 

mlcarson

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jul 12, 2009
Messages
358
I guess we all have an idea what another Carrington Event would do to our graphic cards now...
 

cpufrost

Weaksauce
Joined
Sep 28, 2020
Messages
66
200kA is a LOT of current. That switch took a serious beating.
That rig would be fun to simulate lightning strikes on hardware.
The magnetic field from those pulses could do serious damage too.
Imagine that in the hands of TechRax! :-D
 
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