cageymaru

Fully [H]
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HyperX, the gaming division of Kingston Technology Company Inc., has revealed its new Cloud Orbit gaming headsets that use the same Audeze 100mm planar magnetic drivers from the $399 Audeze Mobius gaming headset. The HyperX collaboration with Audeze incorporates a pop filter to create a better mic solution. The Waves Nx head tracking technology is now optional as some users didn't feel it was worth the extra cost in the Audeze Mobius.

The HyperX Cloud Orbit series has discarded the Bluetooth technology from the Audeze Mobius in favor of a wired solution. The devices will accept an analog 3.5mm input, USB-A, or USB-C. The headsets still require power to run the built in DSP which will last for 10 hours on a single charge. The DSP allows users access to sound profiles. The $329 Cloud Orbit S includes Waves Nx head tracking technology, while the cheaper $299 Cloud Orbit will not. Audeze has improved its head tracking motion technology to accept head movements as keybinds in the latest iterations of its software. I'm happy to see that HyperX and Audeze incorporated all of the tweaks that Kyle recommended in his Audeze Mobius review. I can't wait to find out how the new headsets sound and operate!

HyperX tells me the Cloud Orbit headphones will have five preloaded sound profiles, and unlike Audeze's very neutral tuning, HyperX will lean in more toward an exciting, bass-rich sound signature. "Everyone loves a smile," said HyperX product marketing chief Mark Tekunoff, referring to the smile-shaped frequency response graph of a pair of headphones with emphasized bass and treble. The detachable microphone of the Cloud Orbits has gained a pop filter over the Audeze Mobius. Though it's flexible, I was never really able to bend it out of the way enough, so you'll basically be attaching it when you want to use it and detaching it when you don't.
 
hmm this will be interesting for me. While I've been using different headsets, I do have a couple of clouds and a cloud flight now and they are still a joy to use. Might try these out.
 
Interesting this is actually a really big name in -real- headphones. Wonder what kind of sacrifices are being made here.
 
Interesting this is actually a really big name in -real- headphones. Wonder what kind of sacrifices are being made here.
I detailed all I could find like the lack of Bluetooth, wired, etc. Hopefully Kyle gets one to review!
 
I am actually impressed. These use the Audeze Planar magnetic drivers. $300 for something like this isn't steep given what you're getting.
 
I detailed all I could find like the lack of Bluetooth, wired, etc. Hopefully Kyle gets one to review!
Well a lot more can go wrong here, there is a surprising amount of finesse in making a Planar magnetic driver and any number of things being cheaped out could result in very sibilant or bass anemic headphone with no soundstage or very prone to cracking.
 
Well a lot more can go wrong here, there is a surprising amount of finesse in making a Planar magnetic driver and any number of things being cheaped out could result in very sibilant or bass anemic headphone with no soundstage or very prone to cracking.

At any rate. Try before we buy applies here. I wouldn't blindly trust most gaming website reviewers when it comes to headphones. Harmonic distortion graphs wouldn't tell us about the comfort level in prolonged usage at that. Yes, Kingston has done quite well with their headphones, but this is the point where it's competing against the likes of Sennheiser, Audio-Technica, Beyerdynamics or say V-Moda.

(No. Beats don't even count as valid competition here)
 
At any rate. Try before we buy applies here. I wouldn't blindly trust most gaming website reviewers when it comes to headphones. Harmonic distortion graphs wouldn't tell us about the comfort level in prolonged usage at that. Yes, Kingston has done quite well with their headphones, but this is the point where it's competing against the likes of Sennheiser, Audio-Technica, Beyerdynamics or say V-Moda.

(No. Beats don't even count as valid competition here)

When you start hitting the $200 and over mark, you encounter serious competition from established headphone companies -- many of us here on the [H] (and elsewhere) simply use mid/high-end headphones + external mic for gaming (with software for 3D, if needed) -- usually with an external DAC/AMP, as well.
 
When you start hitting the $200 and over mark, you encounter serious competition from established headphone companies -- many of us here on the [H] (and elsewhere) simply use mid/high-end headphones + external mic for gaming (with software for 3D, if needed) -- usually with an external DAC/AMP, as well.
Yeah. I don't have anything fancy (Yeti suspended on a boom, HD6XX/Fidelio X2 and boompro), but that's the competition when you are asking for $300.
 
At any rate. Try before we buy applies here. I wouldn't blindly trust most gaming website reviewers when it comes to headphones. Harmonic distortion graphs wouldn't tell us about the comfort level in prolonged usage at that. Yes, Kingston has done quite well with their headphones, but this is the point where it's competing against the likes of Sennheiser, Audio-Technica, Beyerdynamics or say V-Moda.

(No. Beats don't even count as valid competition here)
AKG, Monoprice, Audeze themselves, etc, list goes on. And yeah I agree entirely, I mean you can see a lot looking at graphs for sound, but you need way more break down than a simple THD curve or Frequency Response, a lot more to headphones than that. And not to mention Planar Magnetic headphones can be flimsy if cheaped, and break the yolks. Too many questions.
 
I have the Audeze Mobius headphones and nearly didn't buy them because of the bad review they received here. But I got a chance to try a pair out for a few days and after my few days testing I bought them. I think they are amazing. They are so comfortable that I use them for watching movies late at night, for music and for gaming.

So It was interesting to see that Audeze are helping Kingston produce these new headphones. Sort of helping the competition make a cheaper version of their own headset. If they sound as good as the Mobius they are onto a winner!! Just supply long enough cables :)
 
AKG, Monoprice, Audeze themselves, etc, list goes on. And yeah I agree entirely, I mean you can see a lot looking at graphs for sound, but you need way more break down than a simple THD curve or Frequency Response, a lot more to headphones than that. And not to mention Planar Magnetic headphones can be flimsy if cheaped, and break the yolks. Too many questions.

To be fair, the only "Planar Magnetic headphones" whose yolks are known to consistently have breakage issues are the earlier HiFiMan models -- "yolk breaking" is not a "inherent feature of Planar Magnetics/Orthodynamics" -- it happens when the manufacturer cheaps out on the production materials/process. The same can (and has happened) to Dynamic headphones (the vast majority out there) and Electrostatic headphones as well.

As for the graphs/stats, they provide a baseline from which commentary can be made. Otherwise, I can sling around "audio-fool" comments all day, and fool everyone, including myself, into thinking that I'm some sort of "quasi-audio engineer who just happens not to be a professional".

Just like those guys who are selling $2000 "audio cables" and "audiophile rocks". Heck, Monster already does that idea for the mass market (overpriced stuff, and they are the ones originally behind Beats).

Fun example below:
 
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