How to identify and correct errors that show on log events

carlmart

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Sep 17, 2006
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This is Windows 7 that we are talking about. I still use it on my main PC.

That is because there are some programs I use that ran better in W7 than on W10.

But in the last week or so I'm having boots on my PC for no reason at all, when the machine restarts itself.

How can I identify the reason or reasons in the Event Viewer. It's now open and it shows errors, but I don't know what should I look for and need some help on curing the problem, if possible.
 

B00nie

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If you are unlucky, those boots come from attacks against your win7 box when exploits intentionally corrupt the memory in order to inject malicious code. If you're lucky, you just have unstable hardware. Random reboots are often caused by power supply instability, would be the first place to check right after making sure the WIn7 is not visible to the internet at any time.
 

carlmart

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The power supply being en EVGA 750 G2, I doubt the problem comes from there.

How do I make my Win 7 invisible to the internet and/or protect it against attacks?

Is there any image from the Event Viewer data that would help show here?
 

B00nie

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The power supply being en EVGA 750 G2, I doubt the problem comes from there.

How do I make my Win 7 invisible to the internet and/or protect it against attacks?

Is there any image from the Event Viewer data that would help show here?
A brand is no guarantee of correct function. EVGA does not have a 0% failure rate... I have personally had an EVGA black (built by Seasonic) fail just after the warranty.
You can make your Win7 invisible to internet by placing it behind a firewall (not windows firewall, mind you. A hardware firewall...) or at minimum a router with NAT enabled. That way it can't directly be attacked from outside. But you'll still be in danger every time you browse the internet or run programs downloaded from the internet. Or if any of your lan devices get a worm, they'll punch right through Win7 because it will not be patched.

If you want pointers with the errors, you should obviously post the errors you want information about. Someone may be able to help.
 

carlmart

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If you want pointers with the errors, you should obviously post the errors you want information about. Someone may be able to help.
The list in the event viewer is VERY LONG. What are the items I should show here? Can someone tell me that?

Look what I have assembled for now. Where should I concentrate on? What are the main tell-telling errors I should worry about? What can I do about them, if anything?

It's quite likely that will have to move to W10 once and for all.
 

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B00nie

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Those errors look mostly DNS (network) related, nothing that would explain a crashing unless your computer is being bombarded with malformed packets in order to attack it. Windows has always been weak against this sort of thing, I remember the 95 times and winnuke lol. You could drop basically anyone you wanted offline with a push of a button.
 

Chuklr

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The list in the event viewer is VERY LONG. What are the items I should show here? Can someone tell me that?

Look what I have assembled for now. Where should I concentrate on? What are the main tell-telling errors I should worry about? What can I do about them, if anything?

It's quite likely that will have to move to W10 once and for all.
You may find the information you are looking for in the Crash Dump Files by using the Download Debugging Tools for Windows. I have never used the tool, but I'm sure others here have and can assist you should you have questions. I hope this helps.
 
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Check for recent Windows updates in the time frame issue started, if one was applied, remove it, see if it helps. The next time the system restarts, check for any logging before the timestamp of reboot. The way you have the errors shown isn't all the helpful. I would certainly look at the Bugcheck error, Windows tells machines to reboot after Bugchecks sometimes. All critical alerts should be looked at for any finger point to a process or service being affected.

Heat and failing hardware are primary reasons for random reboots. The PC being attacked from internet sources is an extreme remote possibility, especially if you're behind any form of NAT firewall. DDOS attacks go against providers, not end users these days.

I would suspect failing power supply or motherboard if no software trigger is found. How old is the system?
 

B00nie

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Check for recent Windows updates in the time frame issue started, if one was applied, remove it, see if it helps. The next time the system restarts, check for any logging before the timestamp of reboot. The way you have the errors shown isn't all the helpful. I would certainly look at the Bugcheck error, Windows tells machines to reboot after Bugchecks sometimes. All critical alerts should be looked at for any finger point to a process or service being affected.

Heat and failing hardware are primary reasons for random reboots. The PC being attacked from internet sources is an extreme remote possibility, especially if you're behind any form of NAT firewall. DDOS attacks go against providers, not end users these days.

I would suspect failing power supply or motherboard if no software trigger is found. How old is the system?
Except that if your PC is direct connected to Internet you get attacked every second on average.
 
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