How much free space are you comfortable with?

ScretHate

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 5, 2001
Messages
1,889
Just curious what preferences you guys have. I personally start thinking about adding more space when I get down to 100GB or less free space.
 

DisrupTer911

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Oct 14, 2004
Messages
1,193
I'm I'm down to about 25gb on my OS partition, then I start cleaning up and uninstalling old stuff.

if its my backup drives, i defrag regularly, fill them to near capacity, then replace.and that's usually around 2-5GB remaining. I have no reason not to fill them to capacity.
 

Dev1ant

Gawd
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
646
500GB...that's when I start browsing my drives and start deleting stuff I don't need.
 

PhoenixC5

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jun 7, 2004
Messages
335
Once I get below 2TB, I start thinking about adding more drives to the arrays. Right now I'm still plenty good though. ~5TB free :)
 

Bookmage

Gawd
Joined
Sep 2, 2004
Messages
671
Once I drop below 1TB, I start evaluating my usage and considering upgrading or expanding...
Or I see if I can relocate and balance out data across storage servers and delete all the temporary stuff I had...
I'll put a plan together and figure out how to increase my storage in a cost efficient manor...
Once it drops below 500GB, I'll start picking up new drives or parts as needed...
I like having some space on hand for moving around data...
 

iissmart

Weaksauce
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Messages
93
On my storage array I use as much as I can until it doesn't let me access the partition. I think that's around 36k.

On my desktop, somewhere around 200MB. I don't usually start deleting stuff or buy more hard drives until I actually *need* the space, which means I end up using 90%+ space most of the time.
 

odditory

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Dec 23, 2007
Messages
6,482
Maintaining 20-25% free space is my rule of thumb, especially for raid arrays. There's also the performance consideration for spinning disks: 75% into the surface of the disk, sequential I/O tails off significantly (obviously because the disk is smaller as you move inward).
 
Top