How I Became A Music Pirate

HardOCP News

[H] News
Joined
Dec 31, 1969
Messages
0
How does a forty year old, self professed “music industry's dream consumer” turn to the dark side? He was pushed. Obviously this isn’t a story about a real music pirate, it is a story about how an every day person can become extremely frustrated trying to do something as easy as copy his legal music to an iPod.

"You don't understand," I said, "These files were not copied or pirated, I actually purchased them." "Well" she responded, "You didn't actually purchase the files, you really purchased a license to listen to the music, and the license is very specific about how they can be played or listened to."
 
Joined
Mar 19, 2005
Messages
56
Wow. This guy actually called customer service at a record company and they still kicked him to the DRM-curb.

What a way to run a industry into the ground.
 

jtm55

Gawd
Joined
Jun 7, 2004
Messages
542
Hi All,

I understand your frustration with the copy right laws on the books. I've served my country in the Marines, I'm a Home Owner, & I pay my taxes. In addition, I purchase DVD,s & CD,s Legally. However No ones going to tell me I can't make a copy of said media for my own personal use. The Music & Film Industry really need to get their heads out of their Six point of contact.
 

Scroatdog

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Messages
1,432
Wow. Well I hope this doesn't put the guy on the RIAA's short list.

But then again, he's actually alive and not someone's elderly grandmother so he may be safe.........for now. ;)
 

meisterbrau

Limp Gawd
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Messages
183
that's an amazing story. I'm pretty much like this guy - over 1000 vinyl records, maybe 500 or so CDs - used to be a dj in college way back when, etc. I don't think I've bought a CD in the last year - I download 40 songs a month from emusic ($9.95 for a basic sub) - mostly indie stuff, but that's about it. In addition to all the hassles with DRM, there just ain't much stuff out there to listen to anymore, at least for me.

lousy product plus hassles = no sales
 

slacker6

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 22, 2002
Messages
420
Thanks again for showing another article that substantiates why I refuse to purchase another album or movie as long as I live.

If any company is looking for a way to lose business, just follow standard practices of the RIAA or MPAA.
 

whrswoldo

2[H]4U
Joined
Jun 6, 2002
Messages
3,138
Bah, I refuse to pay for anything but live music. Record companies can rot in hell for all I care until they're willing to clean their act up.
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2005
Messages
3,588
Great Story...

DRM, in the long run, only fucks the legitimate customer.

It shouldn't even be called DRM, it should be called, "Fuck me and make life more difficult".
 

Trepidati0n

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Oct 26, 2004
Messages
9,219
Greetings!

Now, is European Commisions view on Apple making more sense?

No. Apple's method is what I would call intelligent DRM. It isn't like they make you jump through a ton of hoops. You burn to CD (with the same program you downloaded them with) and rip back in a non-protected format via a 3rd party software. That is what DRM was meant to do. Apple maintains strict control over their DRM and format because they want control of how that foramt it isued. That is 100% within the rights of any company. Why should a company before used to use a open source format?

The author of the article was dealing with a different situation where the DRM sucked and was extremely hard to work with. I don't mind DRM, just make it reasonable to work with.
 

Draax

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Aug 11, 2005
Messages
5,213
This is exactly what has happened to me on a number of occasions. Suncomm copy protection does the exact same thing. I buy the CD, I can't transfer the songs to my iPOD, I am then forced to download the songs.
 

Martyr

2[H]4U
Joined
Jan 6, 2006
Messages
3,653
No. Apple's method is what I would call intelligent DRM. It isn't like they make you jump through a ton of hoops. You burn to CD (with the same program you downloaded them with) and rip back in a non-protected format via a 3rd party software. That is what DRM was meant to do. Apple maintains strict control over their DRM and format because they want control of how that foramt it isued. That is 100% within the rights of any company. Why should a company before used to use a open source format?

The author of the article was dealing with a different situation where the DRM sucked and was extremely hard to work with. I don't mind DRM, just make it reasonable to work with.

u know, they dont actually endorse you de-drming songs.
 

Miburo

n00b
Joined
Apr 25, 2005
Messages
52
I'm not an apple !!!!!! or a steve jobs !!!!!! at all (actually quite the opposite)

But I do think their DRM currently is probably the best conclusion they could make to dealing with it.

The funny thing is it's not just APPLE the EU should be going after. You think the RIAA would just ignore it if Apple made it easier for all players to get their music for a buck a song?

If they weren't such @$$holes about everything maybe their music would sell better.

I fail to believe that they are not earning money when a washed up artist like britney spears last had an album in 2003 and still is spending money like no one's business. They aren't fooling anyone
 

Farva

Extremely [H]
Joined
Feb 3, 2004
Messages
38,128
It goes to show, they hate pirates, but they hate their customers even more. :rolleyes:
 

metzlerd

n00b
Joined
Feb 3, 2007
Messages
17
It's all about greed. If the record companies had their way it would be pay per listen at a $1 each listen to a song. I don't get too excited about music anymore. When they all want to be millionares for writing or producing a single song, I don't see a way to make them happy.

As soon as people start paying me $1 for each time they sit down and use a computer that they bought and I install once for them, I'll start caring about their need for me to pay again each time I want to play a song on a different player. (I know there are ways around this, but it's called pirating now days.)
 
Joined
Sep 22, 2005
Messages
604
I remember a time, a long while ago, when there was this thing called fair use, that made up for totalitarian licenses by directly letting users go out and enjoy their purchased media, make a backup , do whatever was needed to play it on whatever. Hell, they even let you lend your media to people. Wow we were silly back then...

That is why whenever I buy music, it is CD only (unless it is sony, then you just walk away :) ). You can rip it lossless and take full advantage of whatever fair use rights we have left.
 

impar

n00b
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
Messages
53
Greetings!

DRMs ultimate goal is to have the consumer pay every time he uses the content.
You no longer buy the content, you are always renting it.
 
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