How are really old movies made into HD-DVD movies

Waterworld isn't that old. I have seen it in HD and it looks better than some new movies captured on new cameras, definitely not upscaled 480p. I am pretty sure that movie, along with most movies made around that time, are captured onto film which basically has a very high resolution, as well as better color and reaction time than CCD or CMOS sensors. In that case, quality mostly depends on the analogue-to-digital conversion.

IMO, digital HD camera technology is just now catching up to what we have already achieved with previous high-end film cameras.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-definition_video
 
Old? 1995 is old???

Anyways... Movies such as that are filmed on celluloid not digitalized. Color and such are continuous across the face of the film. Resolution is determined when digitizing from the projected film on to a digital lens (scanning). The more pixels in the digital camera, the higher the possible resolution. There are many factors in making a high quality celluloid film. Size, emultion, speed, color temp, distortion, deterioration, etc. Take a look at film stock to get more info.

Audio, on the other hand is limited to the encoding at the time of the filming. Way way back in the dinosaur ages of such antiquities as Star Wars, some techniques where carved from rock that enabled them to produce some high fidelity and separation.

Bottom line is as long as the source is in good shape, so should be a digitization.
 
so old cameras were high rez, interesting. I didn't mean 1995 was OLD I just meant that I didn't think cameras had a high enough rez at that time to match hd resolutions and up
 
its not so much the cameras, although optics where involved, but the raw film stock and printing that really determined quality. Think how a dotmatrix printers compared to a oil painting. Oil is limited by the finite size of grains of paint in a oil base, dot-matrix. is ink dots.

-- better living thru chemistry :)
 
Old movies were shot on film, either 35mm or 70mm. Do you know how good film is? Well Digital SLR cameras have reached the point where they are considered to be almost equal to 35mm film cameras, and what resolution do they run?. I don't think there would be any problem transferring this image to a format that displays only 1024 or so lines of resolution.

When HD is obsolete and we are moving to some new super HD format those old films will still hold up.
 
Kids, ALL films coming out of Hollywood today are still made the "old fashioned" way, on film. Even TV series are shot on film. They are then transferred to digital format.
Films that are laden with special effects are partly done on computers, and are either merged with 'live action' later in post-production or are entirely computer generated. But anything that has live actors starts out as analog film.
Virtually anything that is HD was shot on film.
 
Kids, ALL films coming out of Hollywood today are still made the "old fashioned" way, on film. Even TV series are shot on film. They are then transferred to digital format.

Ummm not quite. you need to avoid absolutes, they're Allways wrong ;)

There are a growing number of film makers that are using digital cameras. One specific example is Robert Rodriguez & his "mariachi" series the last film (possibly 2) were digitally filmed. He's been working with the boys at Skywalker Ranch who are also now into Digital capture.

So in fact the real Question should be How are NEW films going to fare translated to HD. And the answer is OK the Digital cameras that Filmmakers use are capturing at 24 frames a second at resolutions generally higher than 1080. but there is the translation from 24p to 60 hz to deal with.
 
You are correct about absolutes, let's just say that over 99% of current Hollywood productions are shot on celluloid at 24 fps.
Tim Burton's Corpse Bride was shot with Canon 1Ds Mark II digital SLR's, taking things in a different direction.
The big studios and exhibitors (theater chains) are just now working on digital distribution and projection to do away with the actual film in projector paradigm currently in use.
 
Kids, ALL films coming out of Hollywood today are still made the "old fashioned" way, on film.

Wow.

Do you know of Quentin Tarantino or Robert Rodriguez? Big forerunners in pushing the digital film revolution. If you haven't seen Sin City, I'm sure you've at least seen the previews.

Ireland has also replaced many of its traditional movie projectors with digital ones. They did this to help filmmakers more easily break into the industry and reduce their costs of distribution. This applies because of Ireland's tax credits to the arts, which has drawn both Hollywood and Bollywood onto their land to film. You'll always have the old veterans who swear by traditional film, but the future is going to be digital with the next wave of A-list directors and producers.



Yours truly,
Kid

P.S. Sin City 2 is in production and 3 is announced. :D :D
 
Kids, ALL films coming out of Hollywood today are still made the "old fashioned" way, on film. Even TV series are shot on film. They are then transferred to digital format.
Films that are laden with special effects are partly done on computers, and are either merged with 'live action' later in post-production or are entirely computer generated. But anything that has live actors starts out as analog film.
Virtually anything that is HD was shot on film.

Wow you couldn't be more wrong. Take a recent remake of Miami Vice ..it was shot with mostly $2-3k mini HD cams ... 300 a largely blue screen movie was shot with a railbed camera and High speed Mini's for the slow mo action sceens. Most of Sin City was also filmed on HD cams (strait digital) ..
 
The Panavision Genesis is one of the newer digital film cameras. Superman Returns was shot with it.

From wikipedia,
Although the Genesis would seem to represent a significant step forward, there is still considerable skepticism in the film industry about the real value of digital cinematography for mainstream movie production, and as of yet, only a relatively small percentage of cinema-release projects have been shot digitally since Sony/Panavision introduced the CineAlta in 1999. Only three true "blockbuster" movies have been shot digitally (as of June 2006): Attack of the Clones, Revenge of the Sith and Superman Returns. Other notable but lesser-stature digitally captured features include: Collateral and the films of Robert Rodriguez (Sin City, Once Upon a Time in Mexico, and the Spy Kids series). Significantly, none of the Columbia Pictures CGI-heavy Spider-man series were shot digitally, even though Columbia is owned by Sony.


And about the older films, they will just scan in the film (usually 2K horizonatal res) and then process it for video fps, chroma, and luminance.
 
I read this article on slashdot a long time ago.
http://www.slate.com/id/2114143/fr/rss/

Many DVD studios now scan films at "high-definition"—or 1,080 lines. Warners is one of just a few that scan at 2,000 lines (or, in the parlance, "2K scanning"). Soon, beginning with a Wizard of Oz reissue later this year, it will start releasing Technicolor DVDs scanned at 4,000 lines ("4K scanning"). This is a significant number. Engineers estimate that if you digitally reproduced all the information on a frame of 35mm film, you'd need about 4,000 lines of data. In other words, at least theoretically (and for more on this caveat, click here), 4K scanning captures everything that's on a film.

Basically they scan each individual frame at the highest possible resolution and store the digital copy. Then to cut a DVD, they down-convert it to 720 lines of resolution or to release a Blu-Ray disc they downconvert to 1080 lines.
 
Wow, this has been an interesting thread. kind of like catching the occasional "How it's made" on Discovery Channel.
 
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