Help me picking only one

Discussion in 'Motherboards' started by GustavoWoltmann016, Jan 6, 2017.

  1. GustavoWoltmann016

    GustavoWoltmann016 n00bie

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    I've narrowed down my choices of motherboards to two:
    Asus M5A78L-M/USB3
    MSI 760GM-P21 (FX)
    Both seem equally good to me. I'd like opinions on which you think I should go.
     
  2. sinisterDei

    sinisterDei Limp Gawd

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    Er, the ASUS looks much better to me.

    4x memory slots vs 2x
    Better audio outputs with S/PDIF connection, even though the VIA chipset isn't necessarily my favorite
    Onboard DVI and HDMI
    USB 3.0

    If I may ask, why are these your only two options?
     
  3. jardows

    jardows Limp Gawd

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    I'm using the ASUS M5A78L in my home server. Been working rock solid. The main reason I picked that is that it officially supports ECC RAM, which was in important consideration for the home server. I'm currently using it with a FX8320e, no problems!
     
  4. sinisterDei

    sinisterDei Limp Gawd

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    I'm curious- why does everyone seem to care about using ECC memory in a home environment? What benefit is perceived?
     
  5. Agromahdi123

    Agromahdi123 Gawd

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    i was under impression certain server boards and OS require it that was why i thought people used the stuff.
     
  6. whateverer

    whateverer AMD Owns Techreport

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    ECC memory is only of benefit if you have one of the following:

    1. Tons of data (at least 5-10TB+) you are looking to protect with your life on ZFS volumes (data corruption protection), or you are stuck with Windows NTFS, so protecting the live read/write cache memory is the best you can do :D

    2. You actually do long-term processing on a Workstation, and the results are pertinent to your job. In that case, the incredibly rare memory error will still be worth spending the extra money, and taking the ECC performance hit.

    ECC only helps with data IN RAM. Once it's written to disk, it's up to the hard drive to keep it from corrupting itself (or use a file system with active corruption protection, like ZFS).

    My personal experience? Over the years just keeping a bunch pf files rarely used on hard disk, I've seen far more data corruption caused by bad hard drives than bad memory. And even that doesn't happen often, because dead drives are usually only a surprise if you don't check your SMART stats regularly.

    I think I purposefully throw away about a THOUSAND TIMES more files than I actually find corrupted, even after fifteen years of storage.

    It's not a requirement for Windows Server, only a requirement if you want to be able to call and get support from Microsoft. Warning on install, but doesn't halt the installer.

    https://social.technet.microsoft.co...ecc-memory-requirement?forum=WinServerPreview

    Typically, it's mostly organizations that run Windows Server, not home users...and they usually quality for #1 or #2 above, so ECC

    Or you could be one of those rare home user control freaks who just wants to make sure every bit is double AND triple-checked :D
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017 at 6:51 PM
  7. sinisterDei

    sinisterDei Limp Gawd

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    Yeah, the tone of my post was supposed to be a bit incredulous that folks would care about ECC, for the same reasons you've mentioned. After thousand upon thousands of hours of using PCs in a wide variety of roles, from the datacenter to the desktop, I'm pretty sure I've never encountered a problem that ECC would have prevented.

    And the Windows Server installer doesn't even take note of ECC (or the lack thereof) and issue a warning; it just installs Windows and goes about its business. I just got done installing Server 2016 on a system without ECC and it's happy as a clam. And calling Microsoft for support isn't something most people ever do, not the least of which is because it's not free to do so.

    Plus, I've called Microsoft on various issues approximately 10 times in my life, and I've yet to be asked if the system is running ECC memory. :)

    In summary, ECC isn't bad. It's just not necessary, and generally shouldn't be a thought in anyone's head.