Haswell Delidded

tonyftw

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 21, 2013
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1,817
I'm curious to see if this makes any difference for you. I haven't seen any symptoms of power regulation issues on my 6 phase asrock extreme 4. .

I'll need to remove the cap on my 4670k because it needs 1.36v for 4.5.

I typically stay away from lower end asrock boards, as they usually cheap out with those boards. They're fine for normal, day-to-day uses though.

If your chip does need 1.36v for 4.5, I would rather exchange/sell it for a different 4670k.
 

RVWinkle

Limp Gawd
Joined
Oct 20, 2004
Messages
173
I typically stay away from lower end asrock boards, as they usually cheap out with those boards. They're fine for normal, day-to-day uses though.

If your chip does need 1.36v for 4.5, I would rather exchange/sell it for a different 4670k.

I'm a master ghetto overclocker, don't hate on the cheap parts. :p


I'd like to see how your chip performs in a MB with more VRM CPU phases and better quality VRM before blaming the CPU as being the worst.

tonyftw says we should trade cpus! haha j/k
 

tonyftw

[H]ard|Gawd
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Mar 21, 2013
Messages
1,817
Lol.

I love cheap parts too! It just seems you got unlucky with your i5. The silicon lottery shall continue...
 

RVWinkle

Limp Gawd
Joined
Oct 20, 2004
Messages
173
From a theoretical overclocker perspective, motherboard vrm might grant me more stability at 4.6 or 4.7 but I'd still have to juice the cpu. If you want to see what bad vrm does to overclocking then I could show you a pair of old burnt out gigabyte motherboards in my closet.

Realistically, there's no ripple, no vdroop, most of it is handled on chip, and the area around the socket can be cooled passively. Where is the evidence that vrm will lower voltage on Haswell? Motherboard reviews on [H] all get the same overclocks, no?
 

RamonGTP

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Nov 9, 2005
Messages
8,150
I doubt any of the overclocking issues are due to "cheap vrms" or needing more phases. These boards can handle power draw that WELL exceed what Haswell could hope to pull out of them. Swapping boards will yield in a waste of time, not higher clocks.
 

[CoF] ATOMIC

Weaksauce
Joined
Oct 6, 2004
Messages
118
1. Cover the exposed gold contacts next to the die like SonDa5 did with a dielectric coating or nail polish if you are cheap.


So nail polish as in clear top coat will do? I think my wife has some of that schtuff.

Second question, will lapping the delidded TIM casing with 3000 grit sand paper make any impact on temps or there is just no point. I plan on using CL Pro on the die and top of the tim to make contact with the H100i push pull config.

Cheers!
 

ccityinstaller

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Feb 23, 2007
Messages
4,241
Right but back in the day we installed Heatsinks with by pressing down on a small tab (STAB AT THE MB with a screwdriver, opps I mean heat sink tab lol) with a lot of force and hook the SOB onto the socket, hopefully without slipping. With newer mounting systems (especially for water blocks) it doesn't seem like it would be nearly as much of an issue. but I have never delidded, I do however think I may be deliding my future haswell.

Now I just need to figure out which waterblock will be best for a delided chip.

*SHUDDER*..Did you really have to bring back those scary ass days of the Socket7/S.Socket7/ etc? I cannot count how many times I slipped off that fucking bracket and smashed into the MB..I used to wrap electrical tape around the end a few turns..Seems to have worked since I never killed a MB..The worst were the old Alpha heatsinks..They were cooling monsters, but man were they huge and so hard to install:eek:!

I would recommend a lower profile, lightweight block similar to the DT Sniper block SonDa5 has, or the XSPC Raystorm I am using..It is full copper on the bottom half, and acrylic on the top which makes the block very lightweight..

After my parts arrive, before dellidding anything I will first check how much difference OC is going to make in terms of 3d rendering, if real life figures will be worth it then I am going for it.

Just curious why do you propose to use different TIM on top of the lid? If CLU is so good.

While CLU is an awesome TIM, keep in mind it is a Liquid Metal TIM..What does that mean?

Well, a few important things..The stuff works very well, but is not super forgiving of a "bad mount"..While its pretty easy to get it right most times, what if you slip? With a paste based TIM on top, you can simply remove, wipe with 90% alcohol and a few Q-tips, and be in business..With CL, you will spend 20 minutes removing it if you haven't booted the computer and checked your results..If you booted and ran a stress test for a few hours+, you possibly may spend 2-3 hours removing it (and cursing me) while you wet sand it off your block and IHS..So yea, there is that heheh..

I haven't seen any symptoms of power regulation issues on my 6 phase asrock extreme 4. My understanding is that all the stress is on the FIVR. I haven't even needed active cooling on the VRM.

Your understanding is wrong. Now before you assume I am being an a-hole, you are far from the only person that misunderstands what the FIVR on Haswell really does..Intel needs their asses kicked for trying to market the FIVR as an enthusiast feature that would would help in our world..

They did it for 2 Reasons IMHO..The first being that they knew Haswell was already getting a "meh" buzz from the early leaks, so they threw a marketing Hail Mary and listed every "feature" of the mobile side of things as a benefit for us on our side..The second being solely to allow them to push that power envelope down as low as possible at idle..While that is great for mobile users, it doesn't mean much to us since we don't run our rigs on batteries:rolleyes:...

Without getting into any higher level electrical engineering design, see AgentQ's feedback to SonDa5's thoughts on the VRM and power delivery..It is spot on, and I agree 100% that even the 40A IR3553s would power even a 5Ghz+ LN or Dry Ice Run since it is coupled with a full 8 phases..

I typically stay away from lower end asrock boards, as they usually cheap out with those boards. They're fine for normal, day-to-day uses though.

I would hardly call the Z77/Z87 Extreme 4/6s as "lower end MBs"..This isn't 2006, and ASRock has delivered a solid set of boards that have the SAME features (or more) then ASUS, MSI, and Gigabyte @ a cheaper price point..They also use pretty decent power stage components..

I have built quite a few heavily o/c'd 3770K/3570K systems around the ASRock Z77 Extreme 4s and LOVE them..Not a single setup problem, even with non QVL memory, and very easy o/c's..ASRock was the first to offer full multi-core overclocking on non K SKUs, which allows a 4+Ghz o/c on the standard 2600/3570/3770/4670/4770 SKUs...

So nail polish as in clear top coat will do? I think my wife has some of that schtuff.

Second question, will lapping the delidded TIM casing with 3000 grit sand paper make any impact on temps or there is just no point. I plan on using CL Pro on the die and top of the tim to make contact with the H100i push pull config.

Yes, a $.69 bottle of clear nail polish will work just fine..You could use clear automotive silicon, but the nail polish is cheaper and easier..

As far as lapping, there has been some benefit to lapping the "bottom" of the IHS to make it as flat as possible. This will minimize the "gap" between the IHS and green pcb, which is currently filled with the crummy black crap..Just make sure to fully remove the black stuff to ensure you can get the IHS as close as possible..

I am not sure I would lap the top of the IHS, unless you are 100% sure you do not a convex bottom on the H100 cpu block..Most blocks come this way since Intel's IHS is usually concave, and the pressure applied when mounting the block basically serves to "bend" the two together to try to seal it as tight as possible..

Now if your block isn't flat, you can certainly lap both it and the IHS top, its just a bit more work..I have lapped quite a few cpus, from an E8400/Q6600/Xeon qaud core (1366)/I970..Strangely, I have always found that every AMD cpu I have owned was so close to flat that it wasn't worth the effort..I usually only wet-sand up to 1500, since anything over that doesn't make even a .5C difference..

/endmassivewalloftextreply
 

SonDa5

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Aug 20, 2008
Messages
7,430
Instead of bright orange tubing, I would go with some white, and do white fans (you can easily paint the ones you have now)..It would be an awesome cream-sickle style...Talk about sweet :cool:!!


You kidding ME?
 
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