Has anyone played with IPv6?

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by Red Squirrel, Feb 16, 2011.

  1. Red Squirrel

    Red Squirrel [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Given this will eventually be the new standard, and it might possibly happen in my life time, I want to start considering to learn how it works and how to work with it and what not.

    Just wondering if anyone has played around with it or actually runs environments that use IPv6, or know of good tutorials to read up on?

    Just starting this for general discussion, and resources, more or less.
     
  2. War Zone

    War Zone Limp Gawd

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    Agreed probably will happen in our life time .
    The internet running out of ips so unless we all want to go NAT crazy well you know .
    messed with it a bit but mostly im still just using IPv4
     
  3. AMD_Gamer

    AMD_Gamer [H]ard as it Gets

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    I was going to ask this, does anyone run IPv6 on their home network?
     
  4. /usr/home

    /usr/home [H]ardness Supreme

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    Many people, even Joe Blow run IPv6 on their home networks. They just don't know it. 7 and Vista have it enabled by default. I have it enabled and it works, but I prefer to use IPv4 internally.
     
  5. AMD_Gamer

    AMD_Gamer [H]ard as it Gets

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    I know that but you don't have an IPv6 address assigned lol.
     
  6. War Zone

    War Zone Limp Gawd

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    i still use winxp ;)
     
  7. PigLover

    PigLover [H]ard|Gawd

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    Yes, running IPv6 at home here.

    Go visit "www.tunnelbroker.net". They will give you - free - a tunnel endpoint service that you can use to get IPv6 to your home. Your router needs to support the 6in4 tunnel service. Among others, anything running newer dd-wrt, open-wrt, some newer linksys, mikrotik and anybody here running a 'real' router can play. Those of you using pfsense can support it with a special load (google pfsense ipv6) but its fragile.

    With any recent Linux or any Windows Vista/7/2008 its easy because the client side is all already enabled.
     
  8. War Zone

    War Zone Limp Gawd

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    This is my router :D every pci slot is a 3com t100 lan card more or less.
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  9. SirMaster

    SirMaster 2[H]4U

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    I believe I do for my LAN. When I ping my other Windows 7 machines I get a response back in the cmd prompt of the IPv6 address.
     
  10. PigLover

    PigLover [H]ard|Gawd

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    As soon as you activate IPv6 you get what is called a "link local address". This is an address where the prefix is set to fe80::/10. The lower 64 bits are chosen by your driver and are usually based on your NICs MAC address using the EIU64 standard.

    The link local address can be used to communicate with devices on your LAN segment only. Routers are forbidden to forward it outside of your LAN. If all you need is communication among devices on a LAN then the link-local address is all you need - thus the behavior you see above when pinging between Win7 devices on a LAN.

    To do more, you need to get an IPv6-aware router and a /64 prefix so that you can construct globally routeable IPv6 addresses for your devices. Very few ISPs offer native IPv6 service, so the easiest way to get an IPv6 prefix for your network is through a tunnel broker. There are a few out there, but the easiest to work with is Hurricane Electric (www.tunnelbroker.net). They have some simple instructions on their site. If you are [H] you won't have any trouble following along. They also offer an 'IPv6 certification' process that requires you to prove you can actually set up an IPv6 network - the side effect being that after you've passed their certs you'll actually have everything you need up and running.
     
  11. DeChache

    DeChache The ONE - Your Ignorance Annoys Me

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    I keep thinking of moving my home network over to ipv6 just as an experiment so I can learn the ins and outs of it.
     
  12. PigLover

    PigLover [H]ard|Gawd

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    Think differently. You don't want to 'move your network over to IPv6'. You want to add IPv6 to the network you have. They need to co-exist - at least for a while - because most content providers and network services are not yet available on IPv6.
     
  13. f1y

    f1y [H]ardness Supreme

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    boom

    RDP works by IPv6 too.
    [​IMG]
     
  14. Red Squirrel

    Red Squirrel [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Woah what's the % for? Did not realize they had those too.
     
  15. Red Squirrel

    Red Squirrel [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Technically I think you could go full ipv6 assuming all your devices support it, but your router would need to be ipv4 on the external interface. At least I think... I may be wrong.
     
  16. dashpuppy

    dashpuppy [H]ardness Supreme

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    what is the advantage of ipv6 ? Does it do things better ? Is it faster ?
     
  17. War Zone

    War Zone Limp Gawd

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    Gives you more ip's dashpuppy

    Internet Protocol version four is ruing out of ips .
    As more and more people use the internet external ips or wan ips on the internet are running out .
    One quick fix IPS could do is all get on the IPv6 bandwagon then use some flavor of Network address translation to feed IPv4 ips to end users that are connected to em .
    Don't really like this idea but in some parts of the world its all ready being done.
    Iol and if you want a real external ip you have to pay more for it lol , AOl in the UK is like that to name one isp.

    IPv4 = 4.3 billion addresses
    ipV6 = approximately 340 undecillion (trillion trillion trillion) IP addresses.
     
  18. Red Squirrel

    Red Squirrel [H]ardForum Junkie

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    It also supports speeds over 9000gbps, so it is faster too once we have the equipment to supply such speeds.
     
  19. C7J0yc3

    C7J0yc3 [H]ard|Gawd

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    It is coming, and it is going to be soon. By soon I mean the last /8s have been distributed by ARIN, and it is estimated that the changeover will be in the next couple years. This will all be dictated by how fast the enterprise moves.

    Right now there are tunnels and proxies in place to route between the two networks, however eventually those will go away too.

    I have one of our connections setup on IPv6 (test lab) and so far it works well. The plan eventually will be using IPv4 on the inside, and IPv6 on the outside.
     
  20. dashpuppy

    dashpuppy [H]ardness Supreme

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    id like to try it. at home i have lots of things to play with and learn LOL! so the sooner i get on it now the better i guess!
     
  21. Cmustang87

    Cmustang87 [H]ardness Supreme

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    Or some people need to share.
     
  22. x.sci

    x.sci [H]Lite

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    Link local means you can use same address on different interfaces. % specifies which interface to use.

    This would be seriously hardcore :) There were efforts to make this work (NAT-PT) but basically everyone gave up on that (it sucked). Then there's NAT64 but it's pretty new and not supported in most routers. There's an oss implementation but I've no idea how good it is.

    The biggest problem here are apps/protocols that hardcode ips (think ftp, sip etc.) which probably won't work even with NAT64.
     
  23. C7J0yc3

    C7J0yc3 [H]ard|Gawd

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    That is actually being done right now. Since all /8s have been officially handed out ARIN is going through a "buy back" program to have these large corps give back their /8s and get /16s or /24s instead.

    I have done work for a local company with a /24 who is using 10 of those addresses. They haven't given the rest of the subnet back because they just haven't been asked yet.

    So realistically in the next 2 years we will be seeing the migration. I wish it were this year just so I could get it over and done with, however changes this large don't usually happen until something is so unsupported and broken people leave it because they "have to."
     
  24. Cmustang87

    Cmustang87 [H]ardness Supreme

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    Interesting info. I guess we'll see when it happens then...
     
  25. Shadowspawn

    Shadowspawn [H]ard|Gawd

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    There are other advantages to. Some I don't even pretend to have a grasp on. The CCNA instructor in the CBTNugget used this as an example: when you visit www.Amazon.com the routing protocols have to figure out which Amazon.com server you are closest to and route you there, since there are several servers all around the world. With IPv6, all of the servers would have the same IP address and the routing would be automatic and much simplified.
     
  26. tronics

    tronics [H]Lite

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  27. Red Squirrel

    Red Squirrel [H]ardForum Junkie

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    So how does that work exactly? You can use the same IP for multiple hosts and just give them a different interface ID? In what situations would you use that, vs separate IPs?

    Hmm never thought of that, that is a good point. These protocols will need to be modified and basically have a "newer" version put out, not to mention the server/client implementations will need to support it.
     
  28. x.sci

    x.sci [H]Lite

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    Not multiple hosts but same host with multiple NICs. Link locals are meant to be automatically assigned, like the above rdp example. So your host gets ip like fe80::1.

    Now suppose you have 2 NICs in this host. It would be pretty cool if you could ping this address from either network, right? So OS puts this ip on both interfaces and it works. So far so good.

    But what happens if you want to ping fe80::2 from this host? How does OS know on which interface to send out ping? That's why you specify interface with the ip address.

    (Actually OS assigns unique ips based on MAC intead of ::1 or ::2 so there's no worry about overlap and "it just works"™ :)
     
  29. x.sci

    x.sci [H]Lite

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    This was the idea when it was designed. No-one believes that's still possible now.
     
  30. xphil3

    xphil3 [H]ard|Gawd

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    been running a tunnel through HE broker since its inception. Deployed 6PE for a large ISP in the past. Working on deploying right now with an advertising company. Idd hop on the bandwagon soon, IPv4 addresses are all accounted for as of a month ago and still 90% of network engineers today are absolutely clueless about IPv6. I LOVE my job security.

    It's not possible, geotracking became impossible when mobile IP was created. We haven't seen as large of an influx with ipv4 like we will when ipv6 becomes the more utilized protocol.
     
  31. Red Squirrel

    Red Squirrel [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Yep that's pretty much my thought too, so I really want to start learning how it works, and play around with it.

    Like, I hardly even hear talk about IPv6 at work. I think it's going to hit us like a bag of hammers when we realize we HAVE to adopt it. Not a big deal for internal LANs, but ISPs, yeah.
     
  32. x.sci

    x.sci [H]Lite

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    It might be the other way around. Stuff like 6rd makes it rather easy for ISPs to deploy ipv6 even when large parts of their infrastructure doesn't support it. On the other hand, multiple, 'random' ips and especially no nat are gonna be pretty hard to swallow for most company lans.
     
  33. C7J0yc3

    C7J0yc3 [H]ard|Gawd

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    IPv6 internally is going to suck badly. Externally, it will be easy as cake, and even easier for home because your router gets DHCP leases, so as long as your router's WAN interface supports IPv6 you are fine. Even for large companies, your just getting a block of IPs from your ISP, just read em off a page, put em where you need em, and good to go.