Has anyone here went from a PC Tower desktop to a laptop ? If so why and do you feel it was worth it?

ng4ever

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Feb 18, 2016
Messages
1,693
Mobility can be a plus. Cost followed by heat can be big negatives.

I have a high end Alienware m15, but typically daily a 15.6" i5 XPS. Z

Do laptops cause more heat than desktops or are you talking about putting more strain on the hardware ? Sorry not trying to be confusing.
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2011
Messages
887
Do laptops cause more heat than desktops or are you talking about putting more strain on the hardware ? Sorry not trying to be confusing.

Basically, because of their smaller form factor, cramped internal conditions, and reduced mass (i.e., heatsinks are heavy), they are less capable of dumping any heat generated by the CPU/GPU/etc. So they get hotter that a typical desktop ever would, and are more likely to throttle. Laptop CPUs/GPUs also typically have lower TDP to compensate.
 

ng4ever

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Feb 18, 2016
Messages
1,693
Does it matter to have a dedicated graphics card if you don't game on a laptop ?
 

kirbyrj

Fully [H]
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Messages
26,752
Does it matter to have a dedicated graphics card if you don't game on a laptop ?

No not really. The IGP will generally be sufficient for any 2D/Desktop tasks as well as external output probably up to 4K 30Hz as long as it is somewhat recent. Shouldn't have a problem playing video, Netflix, YT, etc. either.
 

Aurelius

2[H]4U
Joined
Mar 22, 2003
Messages
2,935
Is there any advantages ?

Portability is the obvious advantage, but there are a few others.

A laptop can be really helpful if there's a power outage. You can finish work or even keep going as usual if you have a phone with a tethering-friendly service plan. As someone who has worked from home for a long time, having a laptop (even as a backup) is a must.

The small footprint also helps. A laptop can consume a fair amount of space if you treat it like a desktop (external keyboard/mouse/monitor), but by itself it's quite compact. You can also tuck it away when you're done.

Like all-in-one PCs, it minimizes the number of cables and accessories you need if you don't have particularly stringent demands. That can be rather important if you have pets or young kids who tend to play with wires.

The potential for throttling is there, of course, and I'm not saying you should buy a laptop if you intend to play the latest games at max detail. But if you're not a heavy-duty gamer or a certain kind of creative pro, a laptop can be just dandy.
 

123Lanoix

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 13, 2005
Messages
3,980
No a desktop is always better. You only get a laptop because you need it to be portable.
 

Spun Ducky

Gawd
Joined
Feb 1, 2009
Messages
658
I completely abandoned normal desktops in 2018. I keep a gaming laptop for gaming/heavy lifting and an LG Gram 17 for portability. I also keep a ton of hp elitedesk and intel nucs for dev servers and a stack of those the size of a regular mid tower atx is about 20 machines. My main reason was portability for team project meetings and also foot print size. I keep my stash of mini pcs stacked in a corner headless to remote into for various projects and then the main laptop is the gaming machine while the gram is my portable and when I want to sit on the couch to code.

I also noticed that while not as powerful as desktop hardware these mini machines and laptops tend to draw far less power and produce less heat. They of course hold in heat more so than a desktop but for my uses it saved a ton of space in the home office.

If I could do it all over again I would probably dump the gaming laptop and keep one super heavy hitter desktop as the gaming machine rarely moves although when it needed to move for like a presentation that used tensorflow the laptop form factor with an rtx 2060 was priceless.
 

Jinto

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Aug 10, 2006
Messages
1,689
I went from desktop, to gaming laptop, to laptop with EGPU over the past couple years. Now planning to go back to a desktop. Mostly because I am looking to get back into newer games and a desktop is still the best bang for the buck.
 

Archaea

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Oct 19, 2004
Messages
10,410
I've gone from my desktop with a Intel I7 6950X (10 core/20 thread) and Nvidia 2080 to a laptop with a Intel I7 7700HQ (4 core/8 thread) and an Nvidia 1070 temporarily while I wait for my RTX 3080. I've been using the laptop for close to a month now, and the desktop for the last 3 years.
Both with SSD operating systems with 16GB of RAM.

I realize the desktop processor has significantly more cores, but it's really noticeable how much slower the laptop is, and it's not really gaming that's the biggest subjective difference. (a 1070 is still surprisingly capable). The subjective difference, feeling slower, is desktop app use, boot up responsiveness, background CPU use as a constant.

The desktop feels like quite a bit stronger machine...I miss it. (even though most would describe that laptop hardware as quite capable).
 

viper_0307

Limp Gawd
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
230
I used to build all systems around desktop towers. The main advantage is portability; there are sacrifices. Probably a little greener (less energy).

I recently started buying the HP mini desktops (e.g.: HP Prodesk 600 G4) to save space.
 

mnewxcv

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Mar 4, 2007
Messages
7,213
I've gone desktop to laptop to desktop to laptop many times. The new ryzen laptops are the only laptops I'd consider suitable desktop replacements, but, I have decided on high end desktop and a low end laptop to remote into said desktop. That works well for me and in a sense is the best of both worlds.
 
Top