Haas F1 Team uses Epyc Supercomputers

AlphaAtlas

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The Haas Formula 1 team is using the computational power of a Cray CS500 supercomputer with AMD's Epyc 7000 series processors to run computational fluid dynamics simulations. Beginning in the 2019 season, the team will use those simulations to improve the aerodynamics of their cars, which is critical in a hyper competitive, technologically advanced sport like F1 racing. The F1 regulators actually restrict the amount of time teams can spend performing CFD simulations, and the Haas team seems to think the Epyc Processors will maximize the work they can get done under those restrictions.

The Cray CS500 supercomputer, equipped with a Cray ClusterStor L300 storage system and AMD EPYC processors, is planned for delivery to Haas F1 in December 2018. The combination of the system’s design and ability to handle the most demanding simulation and analytics workloads and the high-performance computing expertise of Cray helps the Haas F1 team optimize aerodynamics and more accurately predict and reduce drag, downforce and flow patterns around its race cars. "Having led the industry in designing the most advanced supercomputing systems in the world over the last four decades, Cray understands the simulation, performance and scale requirements the Haas FI team needs to meet their mission requirements," said Fred Kohout, senior vice president and CMO at Cray. "We're proud to provide the Haas F1 team with our best-in-class HPC and storage solutions, so the team can benefit from on-track performance in building winning Formula One race cars."
 
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AlphaAtlas

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I wonder what parts the cray stuff does that makes it worth involving. Anyone know?

There's a lot of certification involved, so maybe Cray helps with that?

https://www.fia.com/file/74025/download/23987?token=8Dk4HzgE

Also, the processing restrictions are related to clock frequency, number of CPUs, number of cores and so on. CFD is pretty bandwidth intensive IIRC, so maybe the 8-channel 7301s let them squeeze the most computation out of the time they have?



Personally, I think that level of restriction is kind of silly. F1 could learn a thing or two from S.C.O.R.E, who's unlimited class restrictions amount to:

- You need a roll cage.
- Your vehicle needs to roll across the finish line to finish the race.
- Try not to run over anyone along the way.
 
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Oldmodder

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My grey matter would have no problem putting Hass F1 and AMD together, both hard fighting underdogs,,,, which i like.
Now i just hope "my boy" K- MAG / Mini MAG get cars so they can do even better in the 2019 season (y)
I saw his father Big MAG took the #1 spot in the series with the Corvette in the states.

And AMD can pull 2 rabbits out of the hat with ZEN 2 and Navi on the GPU side,,,, that would be so awesome.
 

DangerousMan

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I wonder what parts the cray stuff does that makes it worth involving. Anyone know?

There's a lot of certification involved, so maybe Cray helps with that?

https://www.fia.com/file/74025/download/23987?token=8Dk4HzgE

Also, the processing restrictions are related to clock frequency, number of CPUs, number of cores and so on. CFD is pretty bandwidth intensive IIRC, so maybe the 8-channel 7301s let them squeeze the most computation out of the time they have?



Personally, I think that level of restriction is kind of silly. F1 could learn a thing or two from S.C.O.R.E, who's unlimited class restrictions amount to:

- You need a roll cage.
- Your vehicle needs to roll across the finish line to finish the race.
- Try not to run over anyone along the way.

CFD simulations are regulated? how is that even possible?

They aren't regulated, but bad simulation = bad products

Everything is regulated in F1, a lot of it is to give all (smaller) teams a fair chance at development. For example, a few years back it was reported that Ferrari had a dev budget of 500 million euros ($575 million dollars) with Mercedes and Red Bull not far behind. Teams like HAAS wouldn't be able to compete with that (last year they had a $120 million TOTAL budget.) Some of what is controlled (on top of what AlphaAtlas posted) is they have time limits for sims, ie: you can't run a sim 24/7. I believe it was said that sims can only be run during regular work hours (so like 9am-5pm.) They also limit variables like speed, distance traveled and I believe also the size of the scale models (for wind tunnel testing.)

As for parts, the front and rear wings are probably what take the most testing as they are 'upgraded' in season. Gearbox and engines are also 'upgraded' in season but for the most part its only the big 3 teams that can/will change parts more then once in season. The rest would just use testing to fine tune the gearbox/engine that is already built (there are only 4 engine suppliers for all teams: Ferrari, Mercedes, Renault and Honda.)

The pcs are also used on race weekends to help with race strategies, and not just for their own team, but they will have someone working on figuring out the competitions strategy as well.
 
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dgz

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Can't wait for Zen 2 to buy some more AMD gear. An TR HTPC would be an overkill, wouldn't it?

My grey matter would have no problem putting Hass F1 and AMD together, both hard fighting underdogs,,,, which i like.
Now i just hope "my boy" K- MAG / Mini MAG get cars so they can do even better in the 2019 season (y)
I saw his father Big MAG took the #1 spot in the series with the Corvette in the states.

And AMD can pull 2 rabbits out of the hat with ZEN 2 and Navi on the GPU side,,,, that would be so awesome.

Mag started third on his first race after a wet qualifying session. It was magical. I never would have imagined having a smile at the same time as Ron Dennis. Not for the same reason, anyway.
 

sirmonkey1985

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My grey matter would have no problem putting Hass F1 and AMD together, both hard fighting underdogs,,,, which i like.
Now i just hope "my boy" K- MAG / Mini MAG get cars so they can do even better in the 2019 season (y)
I saw his father Big MAG took the #1 spot in the series with the Corvette in the states.

And AMD can pull 2 rabbits out of the hat with ZEN 2 and Navi on the GPU side,,,, that would be so awesome.

yeah i feel bad for kevin, he's gotten screwed a lot this year, some was his fault some of no fault to his own. really hope they swap Grosjean out for Ocon.. think they would be way more competitive without all the bitching from Grosjean. Still can't believe Ocon lost his ride with Force India.

Everything is regulated in F1, a lot of it is to give all (smaller) teams a fair chance at development. For example, a few years back it was reported that Ferrari had a dev budget of 500 million euros ($575 million dollars) with Mercedes and Red Bull not far behind. Teams like HASS wouldn't be able to compete with that (last year they had a $120 million TOTAL budget.) Some of what is controlled (on top of what AlphaAtlas posted) is they have time limits for sims, ie: you can't run a sim 24/7. I believe it was said that sims can only be run during regular work hours (so like 9am-5pm.) They also limit variables like speed, distance traveled and I believe also the size of the scale models (for wind tunnel testing.)

As for parts, the front and rear wings are probably what take the most testing as they are 'upgraded' in season. Gearbox and engines are also 'upgraded' in season but for the most part its only the big 3 teams that can/will change parts more then once in season. The rest would just use testing to fine tune the gearbox/engine that is already built (there are only 4 engine suppliers for all teams: Ferrari, Mercedes, Renault and Honda.)

The pcs are also used on race weekends to help with race strategies, and not just for their own team, but they will have someone working on figuring out the competitions strategy as well.

the regulations have nothing to do with helping smaller teams, the regulations are just there to control the big 4 (ferrari, mercedes, RB, Mclaren) from using an unlimited budget. the actual current regulations on spending hurt smaller teams way more then it helps them. since most don't have the money to put into wind tunnel and CFD testing. along with the fact that there is no track testing out side of what the FIA approves and must be done in europe only which is why the haas team works in europe instead of the US where they have access to road courses galore but can't touch them.

the only difference with Team Haas and the other smaller teams is that their contract with ferrari allows them to use the same exact engine that ferrari uses on their cars along with the same engine mapping. so their only limitation is the car it's self which was heavily regulated in 2018 because they were using parts manufactured by Dallara to save money/time instead of making them in house which pissed off the other smaller teams.
 
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Can't wait for Zen 2 to buy some more AMD gear. An TR HTPC would be an overkill, wouldn't it?



Mag started third on his first race after a wet qualifying session. It was magical. I never would have imagined having a smile at the same time as Ron Dennis. Not for the same reason, anyway.
AMD is a Ferrari sponsor. Also:

 

DangerousMan

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yeah i feel bad for kevin, he's gotten screwed a lot this year, some was his fault some of no fault to his own. really hope they swap Grosjean out for Ocon.. think they would be way more competitive without all the bitching from Grosjean. Still can't believe Ocon lost his ride with Force India.



the regulations have nothing to do with helping smaller teams, the regulations are just there to control the big 4 (ferrari, mercedes, RB, Mclaren) from using an unlimited budget. the actual current regulations on spending hurt smaller teams way more then it helps them. since most don't have the money to put into wind tunnel and CFD testing. along with the fact that there is no track testing out side of what the FIA approves and must be done in europe only which is why the haas team works in europe instead of the US where they have access to road courses galore but can't touch them.

the only difference with Team Haas and the other smaller teams is that their contract with ferrari allows them to use the same exact engine that ferrari uses on their cars along with the same engine mapping. so their only limitation is the car it's self which was heavily regulated in 2018 because they were using parts manufactured by Dallara to save money/time instead of making them in house which pissed off the other smaller teams.

The regulations were put in place to help the small teams, even if it hasn't actually helped them, by stopping the big 3 from spending a billion+ dollars on dev and testing. Also both HAAS and Sauber use last years Ferrari engine, while other teams use the same old spec engines of the other manufacturers (Force India and Williams use Mercedes engines, Red Bull had all 4 cars using Renault until switching Toro Rosso to Ferrari and more recently Honda engines.)

Track testing days (and I believe wind tunnel too) is controlled by the FIA for a reason; it allows all teams equal days of testing by allowing the smaller teams access to the same testing track (Barcelona.) I believe newer rules also allow smaller teams to have access to the wind tunnels of the bigger teams (if they cant build their own and on specific pre arranged days.) Then there is also 30 days that have to be set aside for tire testing and 14 days mid season where absolutely no work can be done. Basically, on paper at least, teams really only have like one month (January) to build their cars outside of the F1 racing season. Again, it was all done to try to give all teams a level field when building and testing their cars, even if its not working out that way.

F1 is trying to do what they can so there is more diversity when it comes to winning races and the winning teams. If your not a fan of Hamilton, or Vettel, or Mercedes, or whoever is running away with the championship every race/every season, why would you watch the last few races if they don't matter anymore? They are trying (failing) to make it a battle of the drivers, not a who has more money to spend building a car, because Mercedes, RB and Ferrari have what seems like an unlimited amount of funds.
 

sirmonkey1985

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The regulations were put in place to help the small teams, even if it hasn't actually helped them, by stopping the big 3 from spending a billion+ dollars on dev and testing. Also both HAAS and Sauber use last years Ferrari engine, while other teams use the same old spec engines of the other manufacturers (Force India and Williams use Mercedes engines, Red Bull had all 4 cars using Renault until switching Toro Rosso to Ferrari and more recently Honda engines.)

Track testing days (and I believe wind tunnel too) is controlled by the FIA for a reason; it allows all teams equal days of testing by allowing the smaller teams access to the same testing track (Barcelona.) I believe newer rules also allow smaller teams to have access to the wind tunnels of the bigger teams (if they cant build their own and on specific pre arranged days.) Then there is also 30 days that have to be set aside for tire testing and 14 days mid season where absolutely no work can be done. Basically, on paper at least, teams really only have like one month (January) to build their cars outside of the F1 racing season. Again, it was all done to try to give all teams a level field when building and testing their cars, even if its not working out that way.

F1 is trying to do what they can so there is more diversity when it comes to winning races and the winning teams. If your not a fan of Hamilton, or Vettel, or Mercedes, or whoever is running away with the championship every race/every season, why would you watch the last few races if they don't matter anymore? They are trying (failing) to make it a battle of the drivers, not a who has more money to spend building a car, because Mercedes, RB and Ferrari have what seems like an unlimited amount of funds.

and yet when Team Haas took advantage of the rules and used them to their advantage by having Dallara build their tub, chassis and body for 1/10th the price other teams spend, the FIA and all the teams immediately cried foul and completely changed the rules by requiring a certain percentage of the car to be built in house after the 2017 season.. in reality the FIA and F1 have no clue how to manage development costs. the biggest issue F1 has is that the teams control the prison and the FIA doesn't.
 

DangerousMan

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and yet when Team Haas took advantage of the rules and used them to their advantage by having Dallara build their tub, chassis and body for 1/10th the price other teams spend, the FIA and all the teams immediately cried foul and completely changed the rules by requiring a certain percentage of the car to be built in house after the 2017 season.. in reality the FIA and F1 have no clue how to manage development costs. the biggest issue F1 has is that the teams control the prison and the FIA doesn't.
True, and a lot of the control is with Ferrari. I lold hard when I first heard that F1/FIA pays a 'Ferrari tax' to have them stay in F1.... then I found out it was actually true.
 

DangerousMan

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What a boring sport...

It wasn't.

Then, one guy would win forever. Then another. And on it goes.

I could flip a coin and the same team wouldn’t win every time.

For a bit of perspective: in the past 25 years 10 different drivers have won, the majority coming from just 3 drivers (Schumacher, Hamilton and Vettle with a combined 16 championships, almost 17 if not for the incidents of '97.)

In the 25 years prior, 14 different drivers won, with only 3 drivers winning more then 2 championships and only 2 drivers winning in back to back seasons. McLaren may have been the dominant team pre '94, but at least there was more then just 1 guy competing for the title.
 

sirmonkey1985

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True, and a lot of the control is with Ferrari. I lold hard when I first heard that F1/FIA pays a 'Ferrari tax' to have them stay in F1.... then I found out it was actually true.

merc, mclaren, ferrari and even RB get a bonus for being in F1 on top of the constructor points payout, Ferrari's is the highest though. hell even williams even gets a heritage team bonus.. RB's bonus is because they were the first ones to sign a 5 year deal to stay in F1 til 2021.. hopefully with the new ownership they stand up to the teams and cut all the bonuses for good. because right now F1 isn't profitable at all.
 

Epic|

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I'm so tired of Haas machines. Guess who's requesting DMG Mori or Makino...
 

DangerousMan

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merc, mclaren, ferrari and even RB get a bonus for being in F1 on top of the constructor points payout, Ferrari's is the highest though. hell even williams even gets a heritage team bonus.. RB's bonus is because they were the first ones to sign a 5 year deal to stay in F1 til 2021.. hopefully with the new ownership they stand up to the teams and cut all the bonuses for good. because right now F1 isn't profitable at all.

The way it was explained to me was that all teams get some of the revenue profits outside of the constructors standings, but Ferrari gets around 70 million euros on top of that. So its; constructor standings + revenu sharing(bonus) + 70 mil(Ferrari tax) vs. the other teams that only get construtors standings + revenue sharing(bonus.) Either way, its said that no matter the standings or what goes on durring a season, Ferrari wins. I guess someone has to pay for the Ferrari theme parks.
 
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