GV-R939G1 GAMING-8GD GPU BURNT INTEGRATED CIRCUIT || HELP!

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Hi, I'm new to the forum and I need help with this, can anyone help me?
So a friend of mine gave me this graphics card as an extra for buying from him some parts for my new pc. He told me it wasn't working and I found out why. One of the integrated circuits is completely burnt. If anyone could tell the name of this circuit I may be able to buy one and fix it. I have already tested all the fuses and they are fine.
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IMG_20200823_155119.jpg
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alxlwson

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What's the GPU model?

NVM it's in title


Can you get a better picture of the damaged IC? Try and get what little markings are legible
 
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What's the GPU model?

NVM it's in title


Can you get a better picture of the damaged IC? Try and get what little markings are legible
The second picture is the one with the best quality. That is literally all you can see: "...202S" and "...724T" something like that. If someone has the same GPU it would be easier to know.
 

alxlwson

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The second picture is the one with the best quality. That is literally all you can see: "...202S" and "...724T" something like that. If someone has the same GPU it would be easier to know.

It's hard to read because the forum compresses the image.
 
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It's hard to read because the forum compresses the image.
It is impossible to read, that is the point. I need to know the exact name but the only reference I have is the "...202S" and "...724T". Even with better quality you won´t be able to see what it says.
 

pendragon1

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its the same as the one next to it, look at that one, find one, get one, solder it on.
 
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its the same as the one next to it, look at that one, find one, get one, solder it on.
I checked and it has a different reference(uP1503v PGK48R vs "...202S" "...724T". ), does that matter? If not, should I buy the same and use it?
IMG_20200823_180712.jpg
 

GiGaBiTe

[H]ard|Gawd
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oh, yeah probably. time to summon GiGaBiTe

I'm not really the right person to summon for this, I'd recommend RazorWind instead. He had a thread not too long ago repairing a bunch of video cards, and is way more practiced in that art than I am. I think the last time I repaired a video card with blown power regulation circuitry was like a decade ago.

https://hardforum.com/threads/graphics-card-autopsy-msi-980-ti-golden-edition.1993063/

I can say that the chances of the card working again if that blown up mosfet/driver/etc SOIC-8 chip aren't great. That chip blew up for a reason, and I'd say there's a good chance something its powering is shorted to ground. If the chip is found, you should probably get a dozen or two of them, because you're probably going to blow a few of them doing diagnostics.

Some digging around google didn't turn up any good PCB shots of the Gigabyte R9 390, the closest I got was from overclock.net back in 2016:

https://www.overclock.net/forum/72-amd-cooling/1617734-where-gigabyte-r9-390-vrm2.html

The image in the 2nd post isn't high enough resolution to see what the markings on that SOIC-8 IC is. The OP looks like they posted a close up picture of the area, but the photo website it was on is dead. Maybe someone else on Hardforum has the same card and can get a HR picture of it.
 

RazorWind

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I'm not really the right person to summon for this, I'd recommend RazorWind instead. He had a thread not too long ago repairing a bunch of video cards, and is way more practiced in that art than I am. I think the last time I repaired a video card with blown power regulation circuitry was like a decade ago.

https://hardforum.com/threads/graphics-card-autopsy-msi-980-ti-golden-edition.1993063/

I can say that the chances of the card working again if that blown up mosfet/driver/etc SOIC-8 chip aren't great. That chip blew up for a reason, and I'd say there's a good chance something its powering is shorted to ground. If the chip is found, you should probably get a dozen or two of them, because you're probably going to blow a few of them doing diagnostics.

Some digging around google didn't turn up any good PCB shots of the Gigabyte R9 390, the closest I got was from overclock.net back in 2016:

https://www.overclock.net/forum/72-amd-cooling/1617734-where-gigabyte-r9-390-vrm2.html

The image in the 2nd post isn't high enough resolution to see what the markings on that SOIC-8 IC is. The OP looks like they posted a close up picture of the area, but the photo website it was on is dead. Maybe someone else on Hardforum has the same card and can get a HR picture of it.
As Gigabite says, it would unusual to have an IC fail like this for no reason at all. You'll want to order at least a few of these in case you blow it out again, but you can test for a dead short to ground by removing the dead component and check the the resistance to ground on its output pads. If you have a short there, you'll need to fix that before you install a new... whatever that is. I bet you don't have a short, though. If anything, I suspect that whatever is on the output side of it is normal, and you may have a failed bootstrap circuit or something.

The best way to identify that IC is to look at an undamaged card, but you can probably use the process of elimination to figure out what it does. If I had to guess, I'd say it's probably a low power single phase buck converter or an LDO. See if you can figure out what it's connected to in that area, and maybe we can narrow it down.
 
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As Gigabite says, it would unusual to have an IC fail like this for no reason at all. You'll want to order at least a few of these in case you blow it out again, but you can test for a dead short to ground by removing the dead component and check the the resistance to ground on its output pads. If you have a short there, you'll need to fix that before you install a new... whatever that is. I bet you don't have a short, though. If anything, I suspect that whatever is on the output side of it is normal, and you may have a failed bootstrap circuit or something.

The best way to identify that IC is to look at an undamaged card, but you can probably use the process of elimination to figure out what it does. If I had to guess, I'd say it's probably a low power single phase buck converter or an LDO. See if you can figure out what it's connected to in that area, and maybe we can narrow it down.
Thanks for all the answers! Do you guys know where to buy those kind of ICs? I know about electronics but not that much so, what is the process I have to follow in order to know what is connected in that area (" you can probably use the process of elimination to figure out what it does "). I don´t think I have the tools for dismounting it neither, is it worth buying the tools to fix it?
 
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Joined
Aug 23, 2020
Messages
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I'm not really the right person to summon for this, I'd recommend RazorWind instead. He had a thread not too long ago repairing a bunch of video cards, and is way more practiced in that art than I am. I think the last time I repaired a video card with blown power regulation circuitry was like a decade ago.

https://hardforum.com/threads/graphics-card-autopsy-msi-980-ti-golden-edition.1993063/

I can say that the chances of the card working again if that blown up mosfet/driver/etc SOIC-8 chip aren't great. That chip blew up for a reason, and I'd say there's a good chance something its powering is shorted to ground. If the chip is found, you should probably get a dozen or two of them, because you're probably going to blow a few of them doing diagnostics.

Some digging around google didn't turn up any good PCB shots of the Gigabyte R9 390, the closest I got was from overclock.net back in 2016:

https://www.overclock.net/forum/72-amd-cooling/1617734-where-gigabyte-r9-390-vrm2.html

The image in the 2nd post isn't high enough resolution to see what the markings on that SOIC-8 IC is. The OP looks like they posted a close up picture of the area, but the photo website it was on is dead. Maybe someone else on Hardforum has the same card and can get a HR picture of it.
Thanks for the answer! I'm still trying to find what IC is it so until then I can't do much.
 

RazorWind

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Thanks for all the answers! Do you guys know where to buy those kind of ICs? I know about electronics but not that much so, what is the process I have to follow in order to know what is connected in that area (" you can probably use the process of elimination to figure out what it does "). I don´t think I have the tools for dismounting it neither, is it worth buying the tools to fix it?
Digi-key and Mouser are my go-tos for PCB components, with the obvious caveat that they don't carry everything. Ebay and Aliexpress are good options too, if you strike out elsewhere.

You'll need a multimeter to test for continuity. You have to use the ohms mode, not the short detection, which can't tell the difference between most logic ICs and an actual short. Zero ohms is continuity, anything higher than that is likely not. To remove and replace this component, you will need, at a minimum, a hot air rework station, a soldering iron, flux and solder, in addition to the replacement IC.

If you only intend to fix one card, it's probably not worth buying the tools to repair it. You're looking at spending at least a couple hundred bucks, and even then there's a certain amount of skill required.

Here's a pair of videos I made about a superficially similar repair on another 390. The video would be like three hours long if I covered the whole thing in real time, but you'll get the idea.


 
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Digi-key and Mouser are my go-tos for PCB components, with the obvious caveat that they don't carry everything. Ebay and Aliexpress are good options too, if you strike out elsewhere.

You'll need a multimeter to test for continuity. You have to use the ohms mode, not the short detection, which can't tell the difference between most logic ICs and an actual short. Zero ohms is continuity, anything higher than that is likely not. To remove and replace this component, you will need, at a minimum, a hot air rework station, a soldering iron, flux and solder, in addition to the replacement IC.

If you only intend to fix one card, it's probably not worth buying the tools to repair it. You're looking at spending at least a couple hundred bucks, and even then there's a certain amount of skill required.

Here's a pair of videos I made about a superficially similar repair on another 390. The video would be like three hours long if I covered the whole thing in real time, but you'll get the idea.


Thank you a lot for the support! I won't fix it so I think I will sell it. How much do you think it can sell for? I don't think it is worth a lot but I just want to get rid of it then.
 

RazorWind

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Thank you a lot for the support! I won't fix it so I think I will sell it. How much do you think it can sell for? I don't think it is worth a lot but I just want to get rid of it then.
Maybe $50?

For reasons that elude me, you can sometimes get a shockingly high price for dead graphics cards when selling them on ebay, but this unsurprisingly skews heavily toward newer cards.
 

Hakaba

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If you only intend to fix one card, it's probably not worth buying the tools to repair it. You're looking at spending at least a couple hundred bucks, and even then there's a certain amount of skill required.

I will second this, while you can find some cheapish soldering irons (not so much on the hot air stations), it is possible that you may do irreparable damage if this is the first thing you ever solder or blow.

I went through this whole phase and bought maybe $300+ in equipment to replace a phantom 4 ECS and haven’t touched it since. Would have been better to send it off to third party repair, or in your case buy a 5700/2060...

As for the guy above, I would assume they fetch a decent price as a parts card. Don’t have to hunt down individual parts if you have a spare, given the pieces you need aren’t dead.
 
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