Google Pixelbook

Discussion in 'Mobile Computing' started by yeongil, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. yeongil

    yeongil [H]Lite

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    Any thoughts about the Google Pixelbook? I have two:

    1) I wish it wasn't so expensive ($1000 for the base model!?!?), and
    2) I wish the color matched one of the Pixel 2 phones (black, white blue) or the Pixel 2 has a color that matched the Pixelbook (silver?)

    Also, has it been announced exactly which models of the i5/i7 Kaby Lake CPUs are used?
     
  2. Kyle_Bennett

    Kyle_Bennett El Chingón Staff Member

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    Guess you got your answer.

    Seriously, I love the couple of Chromebooks I have, but if I am going to put down that kind of cash on a new laptop, and I am in the market for one, it is going to need to run a lot more software that I use on a daily basis.
     
  3. d.v.

    d.v. [H]Lite

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    i think google is just testing the waters to see if anyone will actually pay $1k+ for a chromebook. i suppose if we're willing to pay $1k for phones nowadays, why not $1k for a chromebook?
     
  4. Mathews

    Mathews n00bie

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    What can I do on a $1000 Chromebook that I can't do on a <$1000 laptop? I could even get a Macbook for that much...

    This price tag is just silly.
     
  5. NamelessPFG

    NamelessPFG Limp Gawd

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    I like that Google actually implemented active pen input on one of their own-branded devices for once, but obviously think they're out of their mind with that price tag (and the pen's a $99 extra, like a certain bitten fruit corporation).

    I can buy at least two Surface Pro 2s or Fujitsu T904s for the price of one entry-level Pixelbook - pens included! And I can run real digital art software on 'em, too!

    Also, if people wanted to pay four figures for a Chromebook, that's what they tested with the Chromebook Pixel. It predictably flopped outside of hardcore Google loyalists. The Pixelbook does more to justify its price tag, but not enough, with the higher-end model having enough of a markup that you could get a pretty spiffy gaming laptop with a GTX 1060 or possibly even 1070 (read: a laptop that's not too weak sauce for VR).

    What really gets me is that if Google was serious about their Pixelbook Pen (which looks like Wacom AES from the sound of it), they could've implemented that on the Pixel 2 XL, but chose not to. Once again, the Galaxy Note's niche remains unchallenged.