Google Fiber Coming to Austin?

CommanderFrank

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Okay, Austinites listen up: If the rumors prove to be true, the rest of Texas will officially hate you all. :D. Google is holding a press conference on Tuesday and the rumor has it that Google is going to announce that Austin will be the next city to get Fiber 1 Gbps broadband service. Forget Texas, the rest of the country is going to hate you. :D

Austin was supposedly high on the list of potential cities to get Google Fiber when Google was first evaluating places to deploy the service, according to GigaOm. And it makes sense. Austin is a tech-savvy city that also serves as the home of a major university.
 

sfsuphysics

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Was going to fix that "rest of Texas will hate you" bit... but I see you fixed it at the end...

Those who will especially hate are those who live in Silicon valley, somewhat near to where Google's actually HQ is... so yeah fuck Austin and their fiber!

Ok seriously, fuck all the red tape that cities put in place to prevent shit like this from happening quickly and easily.
 

Talyrius

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Google needs to hire more lobbyists to stop these oligopolies from preventing competition.
 

polonyc2

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at least Austin is a bigger market then Kansas...I doubt New York City will ever see Google Fiber as there is too much competition in this market
 

Damos

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Time to move to Austin then!

I go there enough anyways. lol.

Come to DFW Google.
 

BBA

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Wish they would have picked Jacksonville instead. Comcast needs someone to kick their ass here.
 

SixFootDuo

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Austin is a bigger market? Where on earth do you get this? I can tell you, out of your #$$!

There are 800k people in Austin, 4.5 million people in Kansas City. The medical industry alone, all of which is very high-tech is, I think I've read, twice as big as the tech industry in Austin. You need to go read that Wall Street or Wired article that explains why Google really came to Kansas City from 2011. Yes I live in KC and yes, biased but until I read that article, I had no clue just how absolutely huge the tech "market" is here in Kansas City. Some of which has to do with the massive billions of dollars invested in infrastructure Sprint has put into Kansas City over the last decade. You also need to understand that the US has 10 - 12+ major internet backbones, of which Kansas City is one. I think there are 2 in Texas, but not Austin. Someone who knows more about this should maybe chime in.

Maybe you're trolling, if so, you really got me!
 

nutzo

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This might explain why North Korea showed Austin as one of it's nuclear targets :)
 

kbrickley

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Austin is a bigger market? Where on earth do you get this? I can tell you, out of your #$$!

There are 800k people in Austin, 4.5 million people in Kansas City. The medical industry alone, all of which is very high-tech is, I think I've read, twice as big as the tech industry in Austin. You need to go read that Wall Street or Wired article that explains why Google really came to Kansas City from 2011. Yes I live in KC and yes, biased but until I read that article, I had no clue just how absolutely huge the tech "market" is here in Kansas City. Some of which has to do with the massive billions of dollars invested in infrastructure Sprint has put into Kansas City over the last decade. You also need to understand that the US has 10 - 12+ major internet backbones, of which Kansas City is one. I think there are 2 in Texas, but not Austin. Someone who knows more about this should maybe chime in.

Maybe you're trolling, if so, you really got me!

As the old quote says, "I do not think that word means what you think it means" ... who is trolling who ... According to 2011 data from census.gov:

Austin, TX - population 790,000 (13th largest in USA)
Kansas City, MS - population 460,000 (37th largest in USA)
Kansas City, KS - population 146,000 (165th largest in USA)

The entire state of Kansas only has a population of 2.8 million; Missouri is 6.0 million ... even including a metro area a population of 4.5 million would be highly problematic ... Texas is the second most populous state behind California and has 4 of the top 15 cities in the USA (by population) ;)

Overall, if this turns out to be true this will be good for Google, good for Texas, and good for internet pipe competition :)
 

dgz

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So, why do people wanna pay for their own spying?
 

dgz

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Makes me sad, though. We made Google what it has become over the last years.
 

kbrickley

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So, why do people wanna pay for their own spying?

Well, it's not like we're talking about having the government spy on us (which is something completely different) ... you can't get something for nothing ... if they are not misusing the information they collect and they are providing a value added service at a reasonable cost then I am okay ...

supermarket cards work the same way ... they can track your buying habits (which is very powerful information) but they also give you lots of discounts ... for me, the money I save makes up for any information they might be gathering ... as with anything, the market will ultimately decide whether Google (or any other service that data mines you) is a value add or not :cool:
 

CreepyUncleGoogle

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Proof that Google doesn't know everything about the world. They're going to find adoption rates n Austin for their fiber extremely low because of what they're forgetting about that's missing from the equation.
 

kbrickley

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Proof that Google doesn't know everything about the world. They're going to find adoption rates n Austin for their fiber extremely low because of what they're forgetting about that's missing from the equation.

Free cupcakes?
 

CreepyUncleGoogle

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Free cupcakes?

Do you really have to ask? Texas is like a third world nation.

Third_World_America-19-2.jpg


They have better things to do like worrying about where the next meal is coming from and hoping someone in the more civilized states to the north will notice and do something.

Allison Wright is trying to help get the word out about how awful it is there. She travels all over the world to document the worst human plights and it landed her in Texas. Here's her photo gallery:

http://www.alisonwright.com/#/documentary-galleries/third-world-america/Third_World_America-20
 

kbrickley

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Do you really have to ask? Texas is like a third world nation.


They have better things to do like worrying about where the next meal is coming from and hoping someone in the more civilized states to the north will notice and do something.

Allison Wright is trying to help get the word out about how awful it is there. She travels all over the world to document the worst human plights and it landed her in Texas. Here's her photo gallery:

Hmmmm ... ok ... but they aren't really building it in Texas ... they are building it in the People's Republic of Austin ... there are different parts of Texas ... there are the metro areas, rural areas, coastal areas, border areas, and then there is the People's Republic of Austin ... different animal completely :p
 

MurphysLaww

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Some weird posts here.

So it looks like it is coming. It'll be interesting. I'm one of probably a hundred people that have built out a fiberoptic network in austin in the last ten years, and wish them luck. It's hard work with a lot of difficult rear-easement build. The company I was with at the time also built a portion of San Antonio at the same time, and it was generally much easier Alley easement work.

That coupled with the fact that there is now ATT, Time Warner, and in many places, my old company Grande on the poles, doesn't leave a lot of room for strand.

To the goofy population posts... Wiki is your friend. Metro-politan pop. of KC is a bit over 2 million, Metro population of Austin is just under 2 million. Difference is, Austin is growing at around 40%, KC at around 1.5%.

I won't deny that Texas has it's poverty issues just like just about every other place. RGV is a pretty typical border-area. There isn't much down there for work, therefore, there is poverty. Austin is a forward-thinking, but goofy at times, tech town. Lot's of startups here already without Google, SXSW, ACL, and now the Circuit of the America's. If it wasn't for the weather, I'd probably like it a lot.(too hot)

It's a great place to have a business, not such a great place to be an employee.

Anyway, It's cool that their coming and it should shake up my industry a bit and, I'm assuming, drive up wages. It'll probably be a great place to be a BBA in MGMT, with production optical splicing experience, that also carries a CCNP:D Future could be even better than it already is.
 

MurphysLaww

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Proof that Google doesn't know everything about the world. They're going to find adoption rates n Austin for their fiber extremely low because of what they're forgetting about that's missing from the equation.

And actually, no.


The company I worked for, Grande had 1/3 market penetration in every neighborhood that we built out, basically sharing the market with TWC and ATT/Dish. This was with a product that was for the most part, just comparable. Googles product, for most of Austin, will be viewed as a step up, which at the price point they are offering, will be difficult for the competition to match.

Most of the competition would have to virtually rebuild their entire network, equipment-wise to compete with the bandwidth Google will be offering. DOCSIS 3.0's maximum theoretical limits are a sixth of what Google is offering. This leaves just about every MSO outside of Verizon in a world of hurt. ATT stopped at the curb, they might be able to pump their system up, but not without a lot of capital expenditure.
 

DoubleTap

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Do you really have to ask? Texas is like a third world nation.

Third_World_America-19-2.jpg


They have better things to do like worrying about where the next meal is coming from and hoping someone in the more civilized states to the north will notice and do something.

Allison Wright is trying to help get the word out about how awful it is there. She travels all over the world to document the worst human plights and it landed her in Texas. Here's her photo gallery:

http://www.alisonwright.com/#/documentary-galleries/third-world-america/Third_World_America-20

Nice troll.

So Austin won't be interested in the Google Fiber (which I dub "GooFi") because some people in American are poor?

There are no poor people in Austin.
 

Old_Way

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It's estimated that there are over 1 million illegal immigrants in Texas. Most of those are in south Texas where jobs are less plentiful.... Not in Austin. California is estimated to have around 2 million illegals. So sure, there are places with poverty.... Just like every other state.

Austin is the capital of Texas, has a bunch of tech industries and quite a few major universities (UT obviously is the largest). It's a 'younger' population and has an above-national-average education rate.

Texas is a state that's 800 miles across and roughly 750 miles north-south. You'll find a lot of different types of people and lifestyles in anyplace that large. Of the 'lower 48', Texas is roughly 9% of the land mass all by itself. So generalizing about Texas just to try and make yourself feel better about where you live isn't being very honest.

I live in Austin, have TWC, and am looking forward to having Google Fiber as an option.
 

CreepyUncleGoogle

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Nice troll.

So Austin won't be interested in the Google Fiber (which I dub "GooFi") because some people in American are poor?

There are no poor people in Austin.

Sure, Austin is a city bursting with wealth and prosperity that hasn't got a single poor person in it with social problems, drug abuse issues, acoholism, domestic violence, uses cigarettes, or is addicted to energy drinks. Uh huh...this leads into an important point that the next post underscores...

It's estimated that there are over 1 million illegal immigrants in Texas. Most of those are in south Texas where jobs are less plentiful.... Not in Austin. California is estimated to have around 2 million illegals. So sure, there are places with poverty.... Just like every other state.

Austin is the capital of Texas, has a bunch of tech industries and quite a few major universities (UT obviously is the largest). It's a 'younger' population and has an above-national-average education rate.

Texas is a state that's 800 miles across and roughly 750 miles north-south. You'll find a lot of different types of people and lifestyles in anyplace that large. Of the 'lower 48', Texas is roughly 9% of the land mass all by itself. So generalizing about Texas just to try and make yourself feel better about where you live isn't being very honest.

I live in Austin, have TWC, and am looking forward to having Google Fiber as an option.

...which is pretty obvious: Even people living in Texas want to turn a blind eye to the plight of the majority living in Third World Southern United States conditions who lack basic services like running water, sewage treatment, and electricity. Texans act a lot like people on Columbia. The few "haves" turn a blind eye of denial at the huge number of social problems all around them. Consciously or not, they realize that their personal prosperity rests on the shoulders of the downtrodden laborers they pay a pittance to mow their yards or service their pickup trucks with huge tires and they intentionally deny its even happening while insisting the few who do have indoor plumbing and live in a nice duplex are the norm instead of the exception. That's just horrible and I'm sorry that people in northern states are stretched too thin with their own social problems to be of much use to the southern areas. :(
 

dcho

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you also see lamborghinis hobbling around horribly torn-up roads down here in houston.
 

DoubleTap

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Sure, Austin is a city bursting with wealth and prosperity that hasn't got a single poor person in it with social problems, drug abuse issues, acoholism, domestic violence, uses cigarettes, or is addicted to energy drinks.

Correct.

Since we don't have any poor people, it follows that we don't have any with the scourge of an energy drink addiction.
 

MurphysLaww

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Either not very bright, or a professional Troller.

Everything you have mentioned is a National issue, not solely a southern, or Texas issue.

You're kinda strange.

Sure, Austin is a city bursting with wealth and prosperity that hasn't got a single poor person in it with social problems, drug abuse issues, acoholism, domestic violence, uses cigarettes, or is addicted to energy drinks. Uh huh...this leads into an important point that the next post underscores...



...which is pretty obvious: Even people living in Texas want to turn a blind eye to the plight of the majority living in Third World Southern United States conditions who lack basic services like running water, sewage treatment, and electricity. Texans act a lot like people on Columbia. The few "haves" turn a blind eye of denial at the huge number of social problems all around them. Consciously or not, they realize that their personal prosperity rests on the shoulders of the downtrodden laborers they pay a pittance to mow their yards or service their pickup trucks with huge tires and they intentionally deny its even happening while insisting the few who do have indoor plumbing and live in a nice duplex are the norm instead of the exception. That's just horrible and I'm sorry that people in northern states are stretched too thin with their own social problems to be of much use to the southern areas. :(
 

Old_Way

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...which is pretty obvious: Even people living in Texas want to turn a blind eye to the plight of the majority living in Third World Southern United States conditions who lack basic services like running water, sewage treatment, and electricity. Texans act a lot like people on Columbia. The few "haves" turn a blind eye of denial at the huge number of social problems all around them. Consciously or not, they realize that their personal prosperity rests on the shoulders of the downtrodden laborers they pay a pittance to mow their yards or service their pickup trucks with huge tires and they intentionally deny its even happening while insisting the few who do have indoor plumbing and live in a nice duplex are the norm instead of the exception. That's just horrible and I'm sorry that people in northern states are stretched too thin with their own social problems to be of much use to the southern areas. :(

Well, when the average american is willing to pay $6 for a head of lettuce and $150 to get their lawn mowed, then we can talk about how to fix the 'Third World Southern...'. The majority of the food we eat is planted, watered and harvested by those low income people. I suspect that the average american will gladly buy imported vegitables and mow their own lawns if that comes to pass. What will those people do then? It will be just like going to Wallyworld and buying a tshirt. Who's going to buy the american shirt for $20, when they can buy 3 for $10 made in China? It's damned easy to be a bleeding heart person and cry over someone else's fate. It's something quite different to actually pull out your own checkbook and help make that difference for them. You may be the exception, but it takes a majority willing to do that in order to make a real solution happen.
 

sfsuphysics

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Well, when the average american is willing to pay $6 for a head of lettuce
I always love these statements... my in-laws own a small family farm, 60 acres or so... they don't employ "cheap labor" in fact my father-in-law is known for paying quite well for good help. And lettuce doesn't cost anywhere near $6 for a head of lettuce. The real culprit in this misinformation is more likely your supermarkets, where a cantaloupe they will buy from a farm for 50 cents, they'll turn around and sell for $3. However if you're willing to pay $3 for that cantaloupe you can go to the farmer's market where they sell most of their stuff for $2 :)


and $150 to get their lawn mowed
Seriously? $150? How many acres of lawn do you have? It wasn't that long ago, neighborhood kids would mow laws for $10-20, be done in less than an hour, using your mower and that's it. Now if you want a professional landscaping company to do your lawn... then you're probably already paying that $150.
 

CreepyUncleGoogle

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Correct.

Since we don't have any poor people, it follows that we don't have any with the scourge of an energy drink addiction.

Those things really are awful. I'm always shocked to see one my my coworkers spend so much money on them just to get his fix. Just because they're legal doesn't mean they should be free from the stigma associated with any other addictive substance.

Either not very bright, or a professional Troller.

Everything you have mentioned is a National issue, not solely a southern, or Texas issue.

You're kinda strange.

I did say that the northern states are stretched thin trying to fix their own problems. Here in Washington, if you've ever driven through Spokane, you'll understand that we're all too aware of our own problems and are working to fix them. Then there's the desolate, almost wasteland between Spokane and Seattle. It's literally like spending about five hours driving through what the world would look like after global nuclear war. There are dust devils over fields, old fences, run down farms where poor people are trying to harvest crops just to scrape by...horrible stuff. They do generally have utilities though and you can see the cost of living differences between the costal regions is a lot higher which indicates that the overall prosperity is greater. It's not perfect, but consider that it takes only pennies to live in Madagascar in some miserable shack for a year and you'll see how cost of living is a strong indicator of economic prosperity and the wide distribution of basic utilities. It also speaks of the effectiveness of government.

Well, when the average american is willing to pay $6 for a head of lettuce and $150 to get their lawn mowed, then we can talk about how to fix the 'Third World Southern...'. The majority of the food we eat is planted, watered and harvested by those low income people. I suspect that the average american will gladly buy imported vegitables and mow their own lawns if that comes to pass. What will those people do then? It will be just like going to Wallyworld and buying a tshirt. Who's going to buy the american shirt for $20, when they can buy 3 for $10 made in China? It's damned easy to be a bleeding heart person and cry over someone else's fate. It's something quite different to actually pull out your own checkbook and help make that difference for them. You may be the exception, but it takes a majority willing to do that in order to make a real solution happen.

That's why I like what Allison Wright is trying to do for us. Her photo galleries and travel to some of the worst places to live in the world like Texas are an effort to raise awareness so people stop and think, "Oh yeah, it's as bad at home as it is in Italy, Honduras, or Slovika. Maybe we should do something." Personally, I don't think high speed fiber is the right answer in Texas given the conditions there when there are a lot of other more pressing unmet needs.
 

gladesmellzgood

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I'm excited that it might be coming to Austin! I just moved here and that would be great if it came to my area!
 

SixFootDuo

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I think its around 4.1 to 4.5 million people that live, work and do business in and around Kansas City, KS ~ Mo within 30 - 45 mile range. The range could slightly be larger. Bad on me for being unable to link to this information. It's been I think about 6 months since I've read this info so even the details could be somewhat different. The point being, there were and still are, especially looking forward, very compelling and sound reasons Google Fiber came to the Kansas City, KS and Kansas City, Mo, Olathe, Ks area. Austin, Texas if I remember correctly also participated in trying to bring Google Fiber to their city back a few years ago. Clearly, Kansas City won out. From the expected announcement coming shortly about Google Fiber coming to Austin, Texas, they were a close 2nd. Either way, congrats. American needs this badly as we have in place many national and local ISPs that want to give Americans less for more.
 

DoubleTap

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Those things really are awful. I'm always shocked to see one my my coworkers spend so much money on them just to get his fix. Just because they're legal doesn't mean they should be free from the stigma associated with any other addictive substance.

Most addictions with a "stigma" have it because of the well known consequences such as criminality, impaired driving, health risks, etc.

Your issue with energy drinks seems to be that they cost a lot of money, other that that and perhaps the sugar content, what's the problem?
 

kbrickley

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Well ... it's official now ... Google Fiber for Austin ... congrats to the folks in Austin :D
 

Outamyhead

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Now if they could bring Fiber to, oh I dunno Sunnyvale and hook up the park we live in, I'd be more than happy to dump my 3Mbps AT&T garbage. You would think in the area we live in, everything would be cable and fiber, apparently the old farts weren't happy about 2 days of work being done to put the lines in.
 

sfsuphysics

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Now if they could bring Fiber to, oh I dunno Sunnyvale and hook up the park we live in, I'd be more than happy to dump my 3Mbps AT&T garbage. You would think in the area we live in, everything would be cable and fiber, apparently the old farts weren't happy about 2 days of work being done to put the lines in.
Yeah it's amazing this area we live in... I had some friends in Sunnyvale in the heyday of cable... shit was new, shit was 30Mbps... shit was off the hook.... then cable when a nasty other direction... we get a bajillion dot coms popping up, more growth, expensive property, and we get... d...s...l the cutting edge! BLEH. At least up here in San Francisco I can excuse it because it's a big city, with greedy hands sticking out, want to lay fiber $10000 permit first... then environmental studies... then feasibility studies... then make sure there's plenty of bike lanes then....
 
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