Good Book(s) for Computer Organization?

noobman

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Can anybody recommend a good book on learning computer organization? I wouldn't mind playing around with an Assembly language, but my main priority is to learn how the hardware works.

I want to learn this stuff primarily out of interest, but I've also been told that learning the low-level hardware stuff might help in making decisions regarding data structures and algorithms when using a higher-level language.
 

PTNL

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There's a lot of similar threads in this board that you can search for. Peronally, I enjoyed the book USB Complete (link in for the third edition), though I read the first edition several years ago.

Though if there is a specific industry or area that you were wanting to get hardware knowledge in, that may help us give some relevant selections.
 
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crowley666

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While not a hardware book, Andrew Tenembaum's OS books are really good. Knuth's art of programming computer is THE reference on that, but it's kinda 'thick' to read.
 

Whatsisname

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I think "Architecture" might be the word you are looking for.

Organization to most people refers to avoiding having all your files on the desktop.
 

Ur_Mom

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At one point, Intel offered some nice books. They were made for the programmer, but went deep into the architecture and registers, etc.. But, a lot of great information. They probably still offer them, but you'd have to search.

I've been interested in the same thing, and am still trying to wrap my head around it. The original 4004 contained around 2500 transistors, while the i7 is almost a billion. So, it can get extremely complicated if you want to get into the strict details. I'd like to, but more as a hobby. I'd like to build a basic (extremely) small computer based on the 7400 series (I think) of transistors.

But, depending on how deep down the rabbit hole you want to go, you could read an introduction to digital systems, or you can go balls deep and get some books made for doctorate courses (which you might look into the free offerings from MIT, no credit, but great learning!).

Good luck!
 

G_K

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You may consider looking at Randal Hyde's Art of Assembly Language since you can get it free and it's presented as a bit more of a High Level Approach to to the machine guts while still explaining the nitty gritty. Plus it's x86 architecture so that makes it far easier to play with

http://homepage.mac.com/randyhyde/webster.cs.ucr.edu/index.html

I can also second the earlier recommendation on Andrew Tenembaum's book. It's a great way to look at the core of what's going on.

HTH
 

Senryo

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Patterson and Hennessey literally wrote the book on Computer Architecture. It's been the definitive version for several editions.

I hate that book. Poor organization (IMO), the questions ask for things levels harder than any example in the book, and there are typos everywhere. Not to mention how dry of a read it is. Had to take the class over because of that book.
 

bher20

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My computer orginazaion professor has published, in my opinoin, a very good book on the subject at lulu, heres the url. Hope this helps
 

mikeblas

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Had to take the class over because of that book.
LOL, come on. Do you really expect anyone to believe that? Which book did you use when you took the class that enabled you to finally pass it?
 

Senryo

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LOL, come on. Do you really expect anyone to believe that? Which book did you use when you took the class that enabled you to finally pass it?

I utilized a lot of websites, talked to the TA, and talked to classmates more the second time around. Hardly touched the book (same book). I also did a bit more work in the class so I could never take it again.
 

Arainach

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I also did a bit more work in the class
And now the problem becomes clear.

Trying to teach yourself exclusively from a book requires substantial effort, even with a good book. The REASON college is so expensive is because of the ability to work with TAs and classmates.
 

syn3rgyz

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anyone got any good websites instead of books? Trying to learn this myself and I'm pretty much only having trouble with assembly language. Can't get any of my programs to do anything complicated.
 

Senryo

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And now the problem becomes clear.

Trying to teach yourself exclusively from a book requires substantial effort, even with a good book. The REASON college is so expensive is because of the ability to work with TAs and classmates.
By doing more work in the class, I meant completing extra work that was beyond normal homework. Moral of my experience is: tried to follow book, failed class; ignored book and used other references, passed class. Professor was confusing (even during office hours), TAs were not always often, and if everyone in the class is confused then there's little to no difference between going to class to learn and teaching yourself from a book in my experience. Hell most of college is teach-yourself-stuff anyway. They just force a timeline on you.

Maybe you used a previous edition; in which case I could understand your loyalty. My experience is stay away from the 4th edition. Many spelling errors, strange organization, and difficult explanations are my experience. I don't see how it could be a self-teach book.

/2 cents
 
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