Generally speaking. CAT 6 vs 7

Liver

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Disregarding the material cost difference of the CAT 6 vs CAT 7. For 1000 feet rolls, the 7 is a bit more than twice the price of the 6. So disregard that specific issue (I’m not trivializing that issue though, it’s a known variable).

Is there any reason not to go with 7? New construction, labor is the real cost. Labor cost is same if it’s 6 or 7.

I can go with 8. That does bump up the price significantly. I am not doing fiber.
 

Liver

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Just go with with CAT 7.

Reason I’m asking is because someone (yes, on the internet) told me the CAT7 cable can be detrimental because it has additional shielding.

I’m no engineer, but that seems to be completely wrong.
 

scrappymouse

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to quote another user
You’re having a hard time finding a (cheap) Cat 7 panel because it was universally hated and practically no one used it for networking. EIA/TIA never even recognize the standard for any use.

Cat 7 requires each pair to be shielded from end to end, so special connectors (GG45, ARJ45, or TERA) are required. If terminated with traditional 8p8c (a.k.a. RJ45) ends, it’ll perform no better then Cat 6a. As with any shielded cable, performance can be severely impacted if not installed correctly.

Looks like your only real option is a keystone panel and jacks. You’re still going to have a hard time finding switches, routers, and NICs that are designed for Cat7. So they’ll still just end up with an expensive Cat 6a network.
 

Liver

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My only reason to go with CAT 7 was the additional shielding and potentially more robust cable. I wasn’t looking for more speed (per se), just longevity of the install.

Lord willing, this is my last house.

No other reason.

Is it worth the expense going to CAT8. I don’t want the expense, but will consider it if y’all think I should.

Edit. Right now it’s easy to install. Once it’s all done, it’ll be virtually impossible to fix with ripping stuff up and the associated costs.
 
Last edited:
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Cat 6, or, at the most Cat 6a.

Cat 7/8 are not a real IEEE standards and are not certified by TIA/EIA. In terms of transmission distance and cross-talk rejection, Cat 7 isn't really much better that 6a. There is no way in hell you require the shielding (and if you did, fiber would be a better option). At best Cat 7/8 are fringe options for datacenter wiring that are going nowhere because everyone is using fiber already because it's better tech there (lower power, better latency, higher theoretical bandwidth).

Cat 7/8 is much more difficult to handle and requires special tools for installation. I find it suspect that the labor cost is apparently the same.

You're not future-proofing by going with Cat 7/8. I can virtually guarantee that: 1) within the next 10-20 years no home/consumer systems will offer > 10 gb connectivity (look at how long 1 Gb has hung on and even 2.5 Gb is having trouble gaining traction), 2) whatever does come next will not be using some cabling standard that's obscure and somewhat insufficient even now.
 

ComputerBox34

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Nobody uses CAT 7 or 8 (which is not even a standard) in the real world.

Use CAT 6a with minimum 2” flexible inner duct that has pull strings back to a central location in the home. Limit angles of the tube so you can actually pull something through it. You could use solid conduit but it will be very expensive without much benefit. (Unless you live in Chicago, in which case you’re fucked)

Run 2 data to all TV positions, 4 data to all desk positions, at least 4 to all media center locations, and one to every WAP position in the house. Plan for 1 AP for every 750-800 square feet depending on floor plan and construction to give you max coverage even at 6 ghz. I would also run at least 2 data to every bedroom.

This should leave you at future proof as possible with the inner duct being key for adding new cable if you need it. I would not bother with RG6 in this day and age unless you absolutely have to have traditional cable for whatever reason. Personally, I’ve already moved on to streaming services and don’t see why others wouldn’t at this point.

Pick a good centralized location to land all of your cables that will allow for a decent sized rack. I would also have RG11 run to wherever your Cable provider handoff will come in along with a few strands of OS2 single mode fiber and 2 CAT6a drops for funsies. You should be ready for any internet provider at that point.
 

Liver

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Doing my research and asking for advice (including this thread). Thanks for the help.

1. Going with 6A cabling.
2. Non metal conduits as much as feasible.
3. We are getting spray foam, so I will try to place the Ethernet cabling on the interior walls as much as I can.
4. If I run a line to a location, it’ll be two lines. Basically fold the line in half and leave them both there.
5. Exterior cameras, same 2 lines.
6. The media closet (what we are calling it) is a completely separate closet, not attached to a room. It’ll have a false door on a magnetic lock. Won‘t even know its there. It is centrally located, so the wire runs will not be that bad.
7. Deep work boxes, as much as possible.
 
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