Gaming desktop to gaming laptop... Opinions?

Tyler-Durden

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 18, 2012
Messages
2,302
I'm thinking of dumping my gaming desktop and picking up a good gaming laptop like a Sager or MSI with a 780M or 870M. I won't transport the laptop anywhere. It'll just stay on my desk, hooked up to a monitor. Budget is $1800 tops.

I'm just tired of maintaining my desktop, swapping parts, etc. Are gaming laptops any more likely to have component problems? Anyone do something similar? Pros/cons?

Thanks for any comments!
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2012
Messages
16
well there's heat problems and limits to what laptops can do' to be honest. the price will be steep. i just bought my wife a AKA gaming laptop and its a nightmare wifi card is very iffy and the time ull get out of it will probly be less than a desktop.:rolleyes: BUT ITS MOBILE....
 

NICKSTAR

2[H]4U
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
3,832
I sold my desktop and got a razer blade. I don't regret my purchase, but if you aren't going to be traveling with it then I don't understand why you would convert.
 

Dangman

Ninja Editor SuperMod
Joined
Dec 15, 2005
Messages
46,062
I'm thinking of dumping my gaming desktop and picking up a good gaming laptop like a Sager or MSI with a 780M or 870M. I won't transport the laptop anywhere. It'll just stay on my desk, hooked up to a monitor. Budget is $1800 tops.

I'm just tired of maintaining my desktop, swapping parts, etc. Are gaming laptops any more likely to have component problems? Anyone do something similar? Pros/cons?

Thanks for any comments!

As NICKSTAR pointed out, if you're not moving the laptop, why get a laptop in the first place? Laptops are more likely to have problems than a desktop yet are harder and more expensive to fix than a desktop. Also, what exactly do you mean by "maintaining your desktop and swapping parts"? Unless you're unlucky, as long as you choose solid components, PCs don't require you to swap parts for whatever reason.
 

teh_chem

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
1,474
I also don't understand why, if you won't be traveling, why you'd ditch your desktop for a gaming laptop. You don't HAVE to maintain /upgrade parts in your desktop, and you'll be very limited with a laptop, heat being the main concern.

What resolution external monitor would you be using? Also keep in mind even the 870m is probably only going to match up with a 600 series desktop card in performance.
 

Tyler-Durden

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 18, 2012
Messages
2,302
Thanks for the replies. Looks like a gaming laptop's no better, and likely worse, than sticking with what I have. Since mid-2012, I've had to replace the following failed components in my desktop: PSU 3 times, RAM twice, GPU twice, mobo once. I've never owned a gaming laptop and thought maybe a "total package" approach might be better. From what I've read here, that ain't so.
 

Sly

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Aug 17, 2004
Messages
5,749
Three??? What PSU have you been putting on your rig?
 

Dangman

Ninja Editor SuperMod
Joined
Dec 15, 2005
Messages
46,062
Thanks for the replies. Looks like a gaming laptop's no better, and likely worse, than sticking with what I have. Since mid-2012, I've had to replace the following failed components in my desktop: PSU 3 times, RAM twice, GPU twice, mobo once. I've never owned a gaming laptop and thought maybe a "total package" approach might be better. From what I've read here, that ain't so.
If you've had to replace your PSU three times, either you've been getting some really crappy PSUs or there's some serious electrical issues in your home. Or you really really have bad luck.

And you wanted to combined said bad luck with a laptop, which generally is significantly more prone to hardware issues than a desktop?
 

Tyler-Durden

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 18, 2012
Messages
2,302
Three??? What PSU have you been putting on your rig?

If you've had to replace your PSU three times, either you've been getting some really crappy PSUs or there's some serious electrical issues in your home. Or you really really have bad luck.

And you wanted to combined said bad luck with a laptop, which generally is significantly more prone to hardware issues than a desktop?
PSUs were Corsair: HX1000, HX1000, AX760i. Corsair RAM, too. MSI for the GPU and mobo. I chose Asus for the new mobo.

Never had a laptop give me such headaches.
 

Bookmage

Gawd
Joined
Sep 2, 2004
Messages
678
see, I would only get a gaming laptop is for portability so i can game anywhere in the house and so i can sell it and swap out whole thing without having to replace parts every year... the downside is having to reinstall all my software and having to keep up 2 date with gaming laptops so i can sell it for a decent price to buy a new one... ie trading up for a new laptop every year... but you do sacrifice performance for that portability...
 

Kueller

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jun 19, 2001
Messages
5,983
PSUs were Corsair: HX1000, HX1000, AX760i. Corsair RAM, too. MSI for the GPU and mobo. I chose Asus for the new mobo.

Never had a laptop give me such headaches.

Are you using a power conditioner + UPS? That many otherwise well-regarded PSU's failing makes me wonder if you've got more basic issues like power quality.
 

Puterguru

2[H]4U
Joined
May 21, 2001
Messages
3,551
I sort of disagree with everyone...

I bought an ASUS ROG G750JS just two weeks ago and couldn't be happier. ($1750)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00IEV85OU/ref=oh_details_o05_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I am using it as a desktop replacement. I have no plans on taking it anywhere. It runs at 45C while browsing the net and max 70C while gaming. It has a 2 year warranty on it and if I get two years out of it that's great. I'll give it to my son and get the latest and greatest for myself again in two years. The temps I posted are without that big vortex fan in the picture. I was only experimenting with that fan since I already owned it and didn't see much of a temp drop when using it so I don't.

I also use to build my own. This was the very first time I bought a full replacement laptop/pc turned it on and started playing games and I am really enjoying it. Don't get me wrong though. It is very satisfying as well to order 15 different parts, put it all together and have a working machine too

iwt1.jpg
.
 

jeremyshaw

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Aug 26, 2009
Messages
12,512
I can see the point of the big ASUS laptops. They are quite quiet. Even my current build, which was aimed at silence over all else, still has a notable tone from the fans (first GT-AP15, then AP13, now Noctuas of some sort). My laptop makes much less noise.
 

limitedaccess

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
7,594
You can buy prebuilt desktops that are just plug and play which come with full system warranties that would be either cheaper and/or faster.

You can't compare cooling and noise of two systems unless you factor in other variables such as thermal load, fan profiles, and etc.
 

harmattan

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Feb 11, 2008
Messages
5,111
I've gone back and forth for 7-8 years between having a gaming desktop simultaneous with a gaming laptop, just a gaming desktop, and just a gaming laptop. The constants I have realized are:

  • Having both a desktop and laptop, when the laptop will never leave your desk, is a complete waste of money (and a lot of it)
  • A gaming desktop is always superior in performance and experience (in particular, the monitor) to a gaming laptop when comparing at the same cost
  • A desktop is upgradable; a laptop is, for all intents and purposes, not upgradable. I know some ppl will tell you you can switch out GPUs, but this is often not possible (due to bioses, driver issues) and is NEVER cost efficient.

Point of my story, if you aren't moving it, get a desktop and a desktop alone. Or, if you really enjoy having a self-contained miniturized gaming maching, get a high-end gaming laptop - never both a laptop and desktop.
 

BiH115

Gif Guy
Joined
May 12, 2011
Messages
9,327
I've gone back and forth for 7-8 years between having a gaming desktop simultaneous with a gaming laptop, just a gaming desktop, and just a gaming laptop. The constants I have realized are:

  • Having both a desktop and laptop, when the laptop will never leave your desk, is a complete waste of money (and a lot of it)
  • A gaming desktop is always superior in performance and experience (in particular, the monitor) to a gaming laptop when comparing at the same cost
  • A desktop is upgradable; a laptop is, for all intents and purposes, not upgradable. I know some ppl will tell you you can switch out GPUs, but this is often not possible (due to bioses, driver issues) and is NEVER cost efficient.

Point of my story, if you aren't moving it, get a desktop and a desktop alone. Or, if you really enjoy having a self-contained miniturized gaming maching, get a high-end gaming laptop - never both a laptop and desktop.

Exact same situation for myself. I'd just like to chime in with my two cents, which doesn't really differ all that much:

There is no point to having both a desktop AND a laptop that are, for all intents and purposes, strictly for gaming. As far as I see it, if you've got a laptop capable of high end gaming, skip the desktop completely, and get a monitor and a keyboard/mouse. If you've already got a high end desktop, and never see yourself (I mean actually see yourself, think it through here) physically moving it to another place, you realistically don't need a laptop.

Time and time again I've told myself, nah, I'll take the laptop to a buddy's house and do some all night gaming, it'll be great! Has actually never happened once...the two sit there all the time. Now, my mac goes with me everywhere as I travel quite a lot. 9 times out of 10, it's an impulse buy, and the new shiny thing to have. Been there, done that, and for the most part, the feeling of euphoria doesn't last that long!

Now if you've got the cash to keep both, go for it, by all means.
 

AthlonXP

Fully [H]
Joined
Oct 14, 2001
Messages
20,507
I've gone back and forth for 7-8 years between having a gaming desktop simultaneous with a gaming laptop, just a gaming desktop, and just a gaming laptop. The constants I have realized are:

  • Having both a desktop and laptop, when the laptop will never leave your desk, is a complete waste of money (and a lot of it)
  • A gaming desktop is always superior in performance and experience (in particular, the monitor) to a gaming laptop when comparing at the same cost
  • A desktop is upgradable; a laptop is, for all intents and purposes, not upgradable. I know some ppl will tell you you can switch out GPUs, but this is often not possible (due to bioses, driver issues) and is NEVER cost efficient.

Point of my story, if you aren't moving it, get a desktop and a desktop alone. Or, if you really enjoy having a self-contained miniturized gaming maching, get a high-end gaming laptop - never both a laptop and desktop.


Same boat myself, sometimes I think of selling my gaming rig off but for what I put into it and what I would get out in return is not worth it. I have an Alienware 17 that I got a sweet deal from the Dell outlet and serves its purpose as well for portability. I think to be honest I will just every other year trade off on which machine I upgrade.
 

wabbitseason

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 16, 2010
Messages
1,511
So you want to buy a mobile computer and then leave it in one spot. Instead of an easily-serviceable, more powerful, quieter, cooler-running, cheaper, and more reliable desktop.

Am I getting that right? You're good, go for it.
 

Tyler-Durden

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 18, 2012
Messages
2,302
So you want to buy a mobile computer and then leave it in one spot. Instead of an easily-serviceable, more powerful, quieter, cooler-running, cheaper, and more reliable desktop.

Am I getting that right? You're good, go for it.
Next time, try reading more than just the thread title before responding. :rolleyes:
 

Deinos

Gawd
Joined
Aug 25, 2011
Messages
556
You can buy prebuilt desktops that are just plug and play which come with full system warranties that would be either cheaper and/or faster.

You can't compare cooling and noise of two systems unless you factor in other variables such as thermal load, fan profiles, and etc.

If you are never moving the system, I think I would go the prebuilt route.

You get the benefits of the desktop:
  1. better cooling
  2. gpu is better than mobile variants
  3. more powerful cpu
  4. more bang for the equivalent buck

While also getting the benefits that you are perceiving with the laptop:
  1. wty: when dealing with failed parts, you will deal with one manuf. instead of dealing with the hassle on a part by part basis with varying wty's
  2. rigorous testing of the entire system that ensures that all components are playing nicely together

Now, if you want to move that laptop around the house (game in bed, outdoors, etc.) or take it on trips. That is another story:D
 

BiH115

Gif Guy
Joined
May 12, 2011
Messages
9,327
Same boat myself, sometimes I think of selling my gaming rig off but for what I put into it and what I would get out in return is not worth it. I have an Alienware 17 that I got a sweet deal from the Dell outlet and serves its purpose as well for portability. I think to be honest I will just every other year trade off on which machine I upgrade.

To add, agreed on all fronts. Selling a desktop PC is always a challenge, and people will lowball you all day, left and right. You'll almost never get back what you put into it, so it's better to just keep it and upgrade it as time goes on.
 

harmattan

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Feb 11, 2008
Messages
5,111
Exact same situation for myself. I'd just like to chime in with my two cents, which doesn't really differ all that much:

There is no point to having both a desktop AND a laptop that are, for all intents and purposes, strictly for gaming. As far as I see it, if you've got a laptop capable of high end gaming, skip the desktop completely, and get a monitor and a keyboard/mouse. If you've already got a high end desktop, and never see yourself (I mean actually see yourself, think it through here) physically moving it to another place, you realistically don't need a laptop.

Time and time again I've told myself, nah, I'll take the laptop to a buddy's house and do some all night gaming, it'll be great! Has actually never happened once...the two sit there all the time. Now, my mac goes with me everywhere as I travel quite a lot. 9 times out of 10, it's an impulse buy, and the new shiny thing to have. Been there, done that, and for the most part, the feeling of euphoria doesn't last that long!

Now if you've got the cash to keep both, go for it, by all means.

Yep, same situation here: I've told myself a dozen times having a gaming laptop will be great since you can travel with it -- my 10-15 odd gaming laptops over the years have left my desk a handful of times and never out of the house. That said, there are definitely advantages to using a DTR instead of a desktop: easier to move (and plug/unplug cables), less space etc. And if you're still want an external 27" monitor, that's entirely possible. As for performance, a laptop with an 780m/880m plays most games nowadays fine at 2560x1440 (sometimes better than desktop counterpart GPUs due to the increased VRAM) so that's not really a concern.

One other overlooked advantage of a laptop is, if you relocate houses/apartments often, it's sooo much easier dealing with a laptop. I'm moving to the UK next month and am having to ship my desktop and monitor with the rest of my apartment in a sea shipment which is a PIA and leaves me without a gaming machine for 4-6 weeks.
 

Anemone

Gawd
Joined
Apr 5, 2004
Messages
903
  • Having both a desktop and laptop, when the laptop will never leave your desk, is a complete waste of money (and a lot of it)
  • A gaming desktop is always superior in performance and experience (in particular, the monitor) to a gaming laptop when comparing at the same cost
  • A desktop is upgradable; a laptop is, for all intents and purposes, not upgradable. I know some ppl will tell you you can switch out GPUs, but this is often not possible (due to bioses, driver issues) and is NEVER cost efficient.

I've had the best of the best in gaming laptops and I'm not a "been there done that" going back to gaming on a desktop and keeping just a lightweight laptop (with just Intel GPU) for portable needs.

  • Gaming is a "keep up" kind of thing - desktops serve better and longer than laptops for this use.
  • Things go wrong in gaming laptops and either your warranty or eventually your wallet will cringe at what simple things cost.
  • When I game I want to be in a comfortable chair with a good mouse, a great keyboard or similar gaming oriented arrangement. If you are constantly bringing your laptop to this "gaming station" what is the point of the laptop again?
  • Travelling tends to enforce that any gaming done is gaming "light" and suits very well to low GPU intensive simple games. A lightweight notebook will do this task very well, and also will last many hours for simple surfing in a hotel room, another travelling staple. Seems to address the best tool for the job part of the equation.
  • When an old laptop breaks it's really heartening to just recycle it and get a new one. Spending huge $$ just to fix some outdated tech and keep it running isn't pleasant on the wallet or the psyche.
  • Stuff breaks more often on a laptop in my experience than the desktop. Stuff that "breaks" on the desktop is more a case of me wanting an upgrade.


And when 4k or DX12 comes along my desktop can be far more easily brought up to spec than purchasing an entirely new laptop.
 
Top