FBI Cannot Examine Megaupload Servers, Canada Appeals Court Rules

Zarathustra[H]

Extremely [H]
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And the saga continues. Back in 2012 when more than 1,100 servers were seized in the U.S, an additional 32 servers were targeted in Canada. Ever since then there has been a court battle over who will be able to access those servers. A court of appeals in Ontario has now decided the FBI will not get that access.

With the servers in the possession of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, during January 2013 the Minister of Justice applied for an order for the servers to be sent to the United States. Megaupload protested on the basis that the servers contain a lot of information irrelevant to the case, but agreed that an independent forensic examiner could examine them before any handover.
 
So 32 extra servers on top of 1,100 is going to make any extra big deal to the FBI/US? Sounds like a good call by Canada.
 
So 32 extra servers on top of 1,100 is going to make any extra big deal to the FBI/US? Sounds like a good call by Canada.
You don't understand. That means 3000 less charges out of the 7 billion they want to do.
 
Bring it.

We have pumpkin carving tools to take care of the leadership, moose equipped with bombs and tankers filled with maple syrup to create sticky border swamps. We too are constructing a wall made from softwood lumber wood chips and the leftover maple syrup.

They also have some sort of chemical weapon called "Poutine". A single bite could kill an average sized man with any kind of discerning taste. *hack cough*
 
They also have some sort of chemical weapon called "Poutine". A single bite could kill an average sized man with any kind of discerning taste. *hack cough*

Poutine will kill them with happiness, Canadian style! :D
 
Back when I used to setup and manage CRM databases, we had a very large amount of US clients who would host in Canada for this exact reason.
 
Why wasn't he hosting the data in his native country?

?? It's not his data. It's the client's data (think Dropbox). They likely had servers all over the world. A big portion of the userbase was North America.


Essentially, they're looking for pirated content among the user data so that they add more "facilitating piracy" charges, or whatever it's called.

Think of it like a bank of storage lockers. As the owner, you don't know what's in each for obvious reasons. Yet the Feds swoop in and search through each locker looking to charge you (the owner of the facility) with whatever they find.
 
Oh boy, looks like is time to bring "freedom" to Canada!

Don't get too excited, this is the court system. It's never truly over.

The arguments put forward by the FBI to acquire unlimited access to the servers are pretty mind boggling though. They wanted to be the people who inspected the servers to decide if they should be allowed to take the servers. I don't know if that's how the system is supposed to work south of the border, but it definitely isn't here. The judge wants an independent legal team unconnected to the case to examine the servers and then brief the judge on the nature of the data on those servers. That equips the judge to decide what data (if any) should be turned over to the FBI, that's how it's supposed to work in the heart of Kanuckistan. This is all about overreaching a warrant. "We get everything just in case something evil was happening" is a terrible legal argument. "Just in case" certainly isn't much of a foundation for a legal decision. With precedent being so important in law "just in case" is the stuff of nightmares.
 
Eventually FBI won't have to go out and get data since the NSA will have it all. Since this data is before massive data collection its not possible in this case.
 
Bring it.

We have pumpkin carving tools to take care of the leadership, moose equipped with bombs and tankers filled with maple syrup to create sticky border swamps. We too are constructing a wall made from softwood lumber wood chips and the leftover maple syrup.
Made my day!! :)
 
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