'Fastest Ever' Broadband Passes Speed Test

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Did they just say "44 uncompressed HD films a second?" Wow, if that doesn't give you broadband envy, I don't know what will. :eek: Thanks to forum member Abditive for the link.

The "fastest ever" broadband speeds have been achieved in a test in London, raising hopes of more efficient data transfer via existing infrastructure. Alcatel-Lucent and BT said speeds of 1.4 terabits per second were achieved during their joint test - enough to send 44 uncompressed HD films a second.
 

jfreund

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Breaks down to 35ish GB per movie. Not "uncompressed", just straight BluRay rips.
 

Megalith

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Yes, because Blu-ray rips can't possibly be uncompressed.
 

drescherjm

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Sounds like they were testing the bandwith of the ISP from 1 point to a second after some tweaking of the infastructure and not really the performance what an individual costomer would ever get.
 

nilepez

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I think Uncompressed means it's not compressed torrent, where a BD is significantly smaller than 35GB.
My guess is this is probably 5 years out (though in theory, I guess I could probably ask old friends and get an idea). Telecom tends to have a very long development cycle. I can remember writing custom s/w for carriers that didn't want to wait for it to go into a release. My first project didn't get sourced into a new release for roughly 5 years. In between that time, someone had to port it into each new release (generally cut and paste). As I recall, there we had one release roughly every other year.

My gut says most movies aren't going to be streamed at Blu Ray bit rates. Then again, compression algorithms will get better and even now I sometimes find that Netflix looks better than Cable HD.
 

nilepez

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Sounds like they were testing the bandwith of the ISP from 1 point to a second after some tweaking of the infastructure and not really the performance what an individual costomer would ever get.

No doubt about that. No consumer subscriber has a need to stream 44 Blu Rays at one time. This is for the carriers/backbone, but it should improve what we get eventually.
 

daglesj

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If its BT then its 5 years out for central London and the homes of the Exec board of BT.

15+ years if ever for the rest of us.

This is the company that would still love to be charging us £100 a month and 8p a minute for 128k ISDN if that meddlesome ADSL hadn't come along and ruined it all.
 

mashie

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This isn't customer facing technology, it is pure ISP backbone stuff.
 

JosiahBradley

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I just got upped to 25mbps! And it only cost 65$ a month! So at that rate it would be 3,640,000$ a month for this O_O. Come on Comcast, we need a Super Extreme Mega Leet Tier now.
 

sfsuphysics

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Meanwhile Comcast and other US ISPs start planning for the future

Basic service up to 5Mbps 14.95
Basic Plus service up to 10Mbps 24.95
Fire service up to 25 Mbps 44.95
Fire plus service up to 50Mbps 69.95
Lightning service up to 75 Mbps 89.95
Lightning plus service up to 100Mbps 109.95
Light speed service up to 130 Mbps 129.95
Light speed plus service up to 160 Mbps 149.95
.....
220 tiers later
....
Ultra Mega Speed Plus 10Gbps 138299.95
 

Hulahoops

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Plus it means less digging and speeding on infrastructure so saves them money with some knock on effects to customers.
 

xorbe

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That's $11M in piracy fines per second at $250K each! Or if we're talking 5MB mp3s at $8000 a pop then it's a much more lucrative $280M/second!
 

Spazturtle

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BT are pretty slow when it comes to speed incresses, Their current top pakage is 76Mbps for £26/month.

Only just starting to roll out 100Mbps+
 

serpretetsky

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Yes, because Blu-ray rips can't possibly be uncompressed.
I'm assuming that was sarcasm

Quick calculation of how much an uncompressed 2 hour 1080p video would take assuming each pixel only requires a single byte (this is most likely not true, usually it's more like 3 bytes/pixel)

(1920 * 1080) pxls/frame * (1 byte/ pxl) * (24 frames / second) * (60 seconds / min) * (60 min / hour) * 2 hours =
358 318 080 000

or roughly 358GB. No consumer optical disc stores that much data. Furthermore, that was assuming 1byte/pixel, which again, is probably not true.

So Blu-ray rips can not, possibly, be uncompressed. Perhaps you meant not FURTHER compressed from their already compressed forms? Or maybe you weren't being sarcastic, im not sure.
 

CaptNumbNutz

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This isn't customer facing technology, it is pure ISP backbone stuff.

That's the only thing I can think of this being used for. I don't think there is a drive array on this planet capable of saturating that connection by itself (including Ram-San's), it would have to be several transmission sources.
 

FoBZY

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BT are pretty slow when it comes to speed incresses, Their current top pakage is 76Mbps for £26/month.

Only just starting to roll out 100Mbps+

Im 12kms from the middle of sydney , and I pay more than that for 9-10mbit...youre doing ok
 

fairlane

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Jun 18, 2004
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"raising hopes of more efficient data transfer via existing infrastructure"

Total nonsense :rolleyes:
 

Tuxon86

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Oct 19, 2012
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With that kind of speed... You see your internet porn before the actors start doing it....
 
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