Extracting your Windows 10 Product Key After Updating

DFenz

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If anyone is interested in extracting their Windows 10 product key after upgrading use the script below. This also works Windows Vista/7/8 as well. I thought it would be appropriate to post since your product key does change when you update from Windows 7 or 8 to Windows 10.

> open notepad
> copy the code below
> paste in notepad
> save as windowskey.vbs (make sure you select "all files" as file type
> run the file you created
> write down your key

Code:
Set WshShell = CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
MsgBox ConvertToKey(WshShell.RegRead("HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\DigitalProductId"))

Function ConvertToKey(Key)
Const KeyOffset = 52
i = 28
Chars = "BCDFGHJKMPQRTVWXY2346789"
Do
Cur = 0
x = 14
Do
Cur = Cur * 256
Cur = Key(x + KeyOffset) + Cur
Key(x + KeyOffset) = (Cur \ 24) And 255
Cur = Cur Mod 24
x = x -1
Loop While x >= 0
i = i -1
KeyOutput = Mid(Chars, Cur + 1, 1) & KeyOutput
If (((29 - i) Mod 6) = 0) And (i <> -1) Then
i = i -1
KeyOutput = "-" & KeyOutput
End If
Loop While i >= 0
ConvertToKey = KeyOutput
End Function

I did not write this script, it was posted on Microsoft.com by a user, but I'm pretty sure it originated elsewhere since I've used it in the past.


EDIT: As Advil said this actually does not work for Windows 10, though it works on previous versions of Windows.
This does not work. At least not like you think it does.

I just confirmed that while this tool produces a different key than produkey does, it is still an identical key for all upgrades of the same type. Both my Win 10 Pro upgrades produce the same key after upgrading with this script.

So, no dice. It's still the same key for everyone. (My Pro key ends in HCFC6) I bet yours does too.
 
Last edited:

Ocellaris

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So has anyone upgraded to Windows 10 via the free upgrade, then tried activating again with a different motherboard? That is all I am waiting for at this point. I don't want a Windows 10 license tied to a motherboard I am replacing when Skylake comes out.
 

DFenz

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It should work as it always has, as long as your other motherboard isn't online with the previous installation active the new motherboard will take over the product key ownership. Though I have once had to call Microsoft to have them manually swap the license to the new motherboard, they will give you some code to type in if this is the issue. As far as I know this hasn't changed. I'm actually doing a new build when Skylake comes out and don't have any concerns about this at the moment.
 
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Whats the advantage of this vs skip key entry during install and just go to online auto activation? I suppose you can enter your key manually during install and then activate online?
 

DFenz

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This is mainly for people who don't have a Microsoft account and just use a local admin account.
 
Last edited:

Advil

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This does not work. At least not like you think it does.

I just confirmed that while this tool produces a different key than produkey does, it is still an identical key for all upgrades of the same type. Both my Win 10 Pro upgrades produce the same key after upgrading with this script.

So, no dice. It's still the same key for everyone. (My Pro key ends in HCFC6) I bet yours does too.
 
D

Deleted member 245375

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As has been noted in the past and especially over the past 2 days: the Product Key isn't relevant anymore for Windows 10 because you must install it as an upgrade FIRST and by doing so you're using the Product Key for your legit activated installation of Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 to work with. Windows 10 doesn't have a Product Key presently for the final build 10240 - it relies on the fact that it MUST be installed as an upgrade on top of a legit activated install of 7, 8, or 8.1.

When that's done, the hardware hash generated which is the unique fingerprint for the machine you upgrade on is sent to Microsoft and stored on their servers. THAT is what matters when it comes to installing Windows 10 from that point on, whether or not you choose to do another upgrade (if needed, or if the upgrade failed for some reason) OR if you decide to do a clean install on that same hardware. Doing a clean install on the same previously hashed/fingerprinted hardware will not require you to put in any Product Key whatsoever - it will ask for the key twice during the install: the first time you click the Skip button to skip entry, the second time it will provide a link that says "Do this later" so you click that.

After that clean install is completed and as soon as you get that machine online, Windows 10 will contact Microsoft, it will verify the hardware hash meaning yes, it's been activated before and now you're checking again, and it will activate at that point since you're already "on file" for that hardware.

This really isn't nearly as complicated as people are making it out to be, honestly.

Because Microsoft 10 MUST BE INSTALLED AS AN UPGRADE THE FIRST TIME AND ONLY THAT FIRST TIME that's where you get the hardware hash fingerprint which is what handles the activation. Product Keys for Windows 10 itself are meaningless at this point in time and will only matter when it becomes available for purchase in retail stores because THEN it will come with a Product Key + COA in the box.

Until this one year free period is up, you are expected to install Windows 10 as an upgrade AT LEAST THE ONE FIRST TIME because that's the offer Microsoft is making - free upgrades to Windows 10 for the first year of release - and after that first upgrade install clean installs become possible - no Product Key needed.

That's it.
 

PornoSatan

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As has been noted in the past and especially over the past 2 days: the Product Key isn't relevant anymore for Windows 10 because you must install it as an upgrade FIRST and by doing so you're using the Product Key for your legit activated installation of Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 to work with. Windows 10 doesn't have a Product Key presently for the final build 10240 - it relies on the fact that it MUST be installed as an upgrade on top of a legit activated install of 7, 8, or 8.1.

When that's done, the hardware hash generated which is the unique fingerprint for the machine you upgrade on is sent to Microsoft and stored on their servers. THAT is what matters when it comes to installing Windows 10 from that point on, whether or not you choose to do another upgrade (if needed, or if the upgrade failed for some reason) OR if you decide to do a clean install on that same hardware. Doing a clean install on the same previously hashed/fingerprinted hardware will not require you to put in any Product Key whatsoever - it will ask for the key twice during the install: the first time you click the Skip button to skip entry, the second time it will provide a link that says "Do this later" so you click that.

After that clean install is completed and as soon as you get that machine online, Windows 10 will contact Microsoft, it will verify the hardware hash meaning yes, it's been activated before and now you're checking again, and it will activate at that point since you're already "on file" for that hardware.

This really isn't nearly as complicated as people are making it out to be, honestly.

Because Microsoft 10 MUST BE INSTALLED AS AN UPGRADE THE FIRST TIME AND ONLY THAT FIRST TIME that's where you get the hardware hash fingerprint which is what handles the activation. Product Keys for Windows 10 itself are meaningless at this point in time and will only matter when it becomes available for purchase in retail stores because THEN it will come with a Product Key + COA in the box.

Until this one year free period is up, you are expected to install Windows 10 as an upgrade AT LEAST THE ONE FIRST TIME because that's the offer Microsoft is making - free upgrades to Windows 10 for the first year of release - and after that first upgrade install clean installs become possible - no Product Key needed.

That's it.

Tiberian I asked you this in a previous thread, but what happens when we still want to use our license on a single machine, but because we decided to do a motherboard upgrade it no longer passes the fingerprint check? We call MS and what proof of our issue are we supposed to offer if we don't have a key?
 
D

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Guest
Call 'em and ask, that's all I can suggest at the moment aka "I don't know because it hasn't come up yet, the OS was just released yesterday so right now nobody knows... except Microsoft."

If worse comes to worse on the call they'll ask "Did you take part in the free Windows 10 upgrade process?" and if you say yes then they should counter with "Ok, what's the version of Windows you upgraded from and what's the Product Key?" which is what they'd need to verify that yes you're entitled to that free upgraded to Windows 10 so they'd just change something in their system and then it would allow for another activation.

Everybody is acting like a problem later on or a motherboard swap is going to create them nothing but nightmares and it's really not even close to being that bad.

If you (anyone reading this) are taking advantage of the Windows 10 upgrade offer and you're installing on some machine that has Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 on it already and is legit and it's activated with Microsoft, you've got that Product Key around someplace either on a COA sticker on the machine, in the battery compartment of a laptop, on a card that came in the retail box, or if needed you can use a tool like the Magical Jellybean Key Finder or Belarc Advisor or a number of other such tools to extract the current Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 Product Key and keep it around just in case it's requested.

That one piece of information - that Product Key for the qualifying product(s) - is all you'd ever really need to prove you're eligible for the Windows 10 upgrade and to get another activation from them in case of hardware issues or yes even upgrades.

One important aspect, however: OEM licenses aren't really transferable so that could prove to be a bit of a stopping point - this is one reason over the years to "little white lie" excuse came into being or "My motherboard in my Dell/HP/Gateway/etc fried and I had to have it replaced, I need to activate this again because of the hardware change." Retail licenses are transferable across machines so upgrades are within your rights to get a new activation without any real hassles, but OEM hardware could be a bit more difficult.

In the long run, a phone call to Microsoft is where you'd get the answers, like it or not.
 

50Cal

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I just use keyfinder by magical jelly bean. But here is what scared me. i did a google search for my code and it took me to some Russian torrent site listing my code. i hope my code isn't going to get fucked up in the future.
 

StormUP

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I feel fortunate to have an MSDN subscription. Click button. Get key. Install fresh. No nonsense with upgrading, extracting key, then installing fresh.

I think I'll go through the update process as soon as I burn an ISO and write down the key anyways though. I want to know how it works because people will likely be asking me as the "expert". And if it works well I probably won't reinstall from the ISO until I have another reason to do so.
 
D

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Guest
But the whole idea of "extracting the key" is pointless in the first place and won't help things: the Windows 10 key that gets extracted is meaningless because it's not used for activation, the hardware hash is which is why a Product Key isn't necessary to get Windows 10 installed cleanly AFTER the upgrade which is the requirement. As stated multiple times so far it's this simple:

1) On a legit activated installation of Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 do the upgrade to Windows 10 - you won't be asked for a Product Key during the process because Windows 10 doesn't require one (it's using the one that's already installed for 7, 8, or 8.1 as long as it's been properly activated)

2) Once the upgrade is complete, and from that moment on on that same hardware you can clean install Windows 10 as much as you damned well please and never have to type in a Product Key because it's not of any use anymore - the hardware hash was generated during the upgrade install and sent to Microsoft where it's stored safely. You can skip providing the Product Key during both points in the installation ("Skip" button the first time, "Do this later" the second). The only reason the installer has the key entry dialogue is for retail purchasers of Windows 10, actually, and right now with it being free to upgrade for the first year there won't be a lot of those.

3) As soon as the clean install is complete and that machine is online it will activate with Microsoft automagically without user intervention.

That's all there is to it, it's that simple and that easy. It doesn't get any simpler than that to explain. Funny thing is you with the MSDN sub do have to type in a key to do a clean install; myself and people taking advantage of the upgrade offer don't if we clean install (as long as the first install was the proper upgrade), go figure. :)

The problem is people then going nuts asking what happens if they have a hardware problem or they upgrade hardware to something better and they realize they have to activate it again because enough hardware was altered to trigger that process needing to be done and the answer is the same as it's been for 13 years now since XP came out: call Microsoft and explain the situation and ask for a new activation for the altered hardware.

If you have an MSDN sub, then none of this matters since you wouldn't be taking advantage of the free upgrade to Windows 10 right now (or the next 11 months and 28 days), it applies to people taking advantage of the free upgrade offer and only those people.
 

Hurin

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Cliff notes: MS has now confused the shit out of everyone.
I honestly don't know how this is confusing so many.

1. Do an in-place upgrade on an activated Windows. This creates a hardware hash for your new Windows 10 license that Microsoft stores (no MS account required).
2. Confirm you're activated once upgraded.
3. You can now do a clean install if you want and it'll activate. The hardware hash for your computer is now stored with MS so the activation will work in the future.
4. If you change your hardware and install clean again, you may need to call MS just like always.
5. If you have any other issues, call MS. They'll usually be cool about reasonable issues.

Even though this didn't work for me, the system is pretty straight-forward. It seems like people are going out of their way to see this as complicated when it really isn't.

--H

P.S. Got word that our volume license keys are on the way. So the issue I had will be a moot point soon.
 

mope54

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Call 'em and ask, that's all I can suggest at the moment aka "I don't know because it hasn't come up yet, the OS was just released yesterday so right now nobody knows... except Microsoft."

If worse comes to worse on the call they'll ask "Did you take part in the free Windows 10 upgrade process?" and if you say yes then they should counter with "Ok, what's the version of Windows you upgraded from and what's the Product Key?" which is what they'd need to verify that yes you're entitled to that free upgraded to Windows 10 so they'd just change something in their system and then it would allow for another activation.
Interesting...this is exactly what I already went through, described in the thread, and you said I was wrong and that microsoft support was wrong.

They explicitly told me that they can no longer change anything on their end to activate subsequent to a hardware change.

That's either the part you missed in my earlier description, I didn't make clear enough for you, or you just think they're wrong anyway.

the answer is the same as it's been for 13 years now since XP came out: call Microsoft and explain the situation and ask for a new activation for the altered hardware.
I was transferred through three different levels of support and the answer from the final technician is they are no longer authorized or able to provide new activations. She advised me to reinstall Windows 8.1 and do an in-place upgrade after I changed my motherboard and my installation was blocked from activation.
 

Eulogy

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But the whole idea of "extracting the key" is pointless in the first place and won't help things: the Windows 10 key that gets extracted is meaningless because it's not used for activation, the hardware hash is which is why a Product Key isn't necessary to get Windows 10 installed cleanly AFTER the upgrade which is the requirement. As stated multiple times so far it's this simple:

1) On a legit activated installation of Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 do the upgrade to Windows 10 - you won't be asked for a Product Key during the process because Windows 10 doesn't require one (it's using the one that's already installed for 7, 8, or 8.1 as long as it's been properly activated)

2) Once the upgrade is complete, and from that moment on on that same hardware you can clean install Windows 10 as much as you damned well please and never have to type in a Product Key because it's not of any use anymore - the hardware hash was generated during the upgrade install and sent to Microsoft where it's stored safely. You can skip providing the Product Key during both points in the installation ("Skip" button the first time, "Do this later" the second). The only reason the installer has the key entry dialogue is for retail purchasers of Windows 10, actually, and right now with it being free to upgrade for the first year there won't be a lot of those.

3) As soon as the clean install is complete and that machine is online it will activate with Microsoft automagically without user intervention.

That's all there is to it, it's that simple and that easy. It doesn't get any simpler than that to explain. Funny thing is you with the MSDN sub do have to type in a key to do a clean install; myself and people taking advantage of the upgrade offer don't if we clean install (as long as the first install was the proper upgrade), go figure. :)

The problem is people then going nuts asking what happens if they have a hardware problem or they upgrade hardware to something better and they realize they have to activate it again because enough hardware was altered to trigger that process needing to be done and the answer is the same as it's been for 13 years now since XP came out: call Microsoft and explain the situation and ask for a new activation for the altered hardware.

If you have an MSDN sub, then none of this matters since you wouldn't be taking advantage of the free upgrade to Windows 10 right now (or the next 11 months and 28 days), it applies to people taking advantage of the free upgrade offer and only those people.
I'd love to see your source on all of this information. Please provide it. (mostly on the hardware hash part, in particular)
 

Hurin

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I'd love to see your source on all of this information. Please provide it. (mostly on the hardware hash part, in particular)
Gotta love all the hostility directed at someone who commits the grave sin of actually knowing what he's talking about and trying to explain it to people who seem more interested in just being perpetually grumpy.

Here's Ed Bott. . . http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-10-youve-got-questions-ive-got-answers/

------------------------------------------
How do I get my copy of Windows 10 activated?

When you upgrade over an existing, activated copy of Windows 7 or Windows 8.1, the Setup program checks the current activation status. If it determines the installation is properly activated, it contacts the Microsoft Store and generates a license certificate that is linked to that hardware. (A Microsoft Account is not required for this step.)
------------------------------------------

Is "hash" mentioned there? No. Is that what is meant? Clearly, yes.
 

Eulogy

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I wasn't attempting hostility - simply asking for a source when something is stated as fact. I didn't realize asking for intellectual honesty was such a burden, or viewed in such negative light around here.
 

Hurin

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I wasn't attempting hostility - simply asking for a source when something is stated as fact. I didn't realize asking for intellectual honesty was such a burden, or viewed in such negative light around here.
My apologies. Given the increasingly hostile tone many are taking with him merely because they don't like what he's saying (accurate as most of it is), I may have misinterpreted your tone. I read that "love" especially as sorta snotty. That appears to have been done in error (taking you at your word). So I apologize.
 

Eulogy

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No worries. Intent is pretty difficult to read over the 'net. I was looking for source so I could share it as well :)
 

bigdogchris

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Went through the Windows 10 upgrade process and verified my produkey output and this script export are different but both are generic keys that everyone else is posting.
 

Makaveli@BETA

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I just used this tool to pull my product key.

http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/product_cd_key_viewer.html

I wrote down my product key from the tech preview I had installed in a VM then wiped it and grabbed a full iso and reinstalled in another vm with that key and it activated fine.

I then did the upgrade install on my desktop and wrote down the cd key from that and both are different.
 

eloj

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This whole locking keys to hardware is such bullshit. Of course it's confusing, because it doesn't make any sort of sense.

I plan to upgrade my hardware when skylake's out later this year, so it seems I'm better off upgrading my hw first and then upgrading the OS, otherwise I'll have to deal with MS. As far as I know my current key isn't locked to my hardware.

Well, it's not like I can upgrade, but hypothetically.

x4N2pfV.png


"Something is incompatible but we're not going to tell you what. HTH GL HF HAND."
 

bigdogchris

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I just used this tool to pull my product key.

http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/product_cd_key_viewer.html

I wrote down my product key from the tech preview I had installed in a VM then wiped it and grabbed a full iso and reinstalled in another vm with that key and it activated fine.

I then did the upgrade install on my desktop and wrote down the cd key from that and both are different.
You are comparing a technical preview key to the final release generic key. Of course they are different.

These keys look familiar?

Windows 10 Home: TX9XD-98N7V-6WMQ6-BX7FG-H8Q99

WIndows 10 Pro: VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T
 

Ocellaris

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I just used this tool to pull my product key.

http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/product_cd_key_viewer.html

I wrote down my product key from the tech preview I had installed in a VM then wiped it and grabbed a full iso and reinstalled in another vm with that key and it activated fine.

I then did the upgrade install on my desktop and wrote down the cd key from that and both are different.

They are the same keys everyone else is using, they aren't real activation keys however it appears you failed to read much of this thread.
 

Hurin

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This whole locking keys to hardware is such bullshit.
Actually, pretending that this is somehow new is what seems more like bullshit.

They've always associated a key to a hardware hash. The only thing difference now is that the key isn't as directly involved now and it just check your current hardware hash against the one they have on file for Windows 10.

You had to call MS before if you changed your hardware substantially. you need to call them now.

If that's "bullshit," then it's been "bullshit" for a long time.

Personally, I'm not sure it's "bullshit" at all. Has always seemed like a reasonable means of stopping/discouraging piracy.
 

bigdogchris

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This whole locking keys to hardware is such bullshit. Of course it's confusing, because it doesn't make any sort of sense.
I really have no idea what you are complaining about.

  • Current system: Install 7 or 8 key you already own, then upgrade to 10 using the Windows 10 Media tool without contacting Microsoft. Clean install afterwords if you want.
  • 6 months down the road: Build Skylake system, install 7 or 8 key you already own, then upgrade to 10 using the Windows 10 Media tool without contacting Microsoft. Clean install afterwords if you want.

I'm failing to see your dilemma or how upgrading to 10 on Skylake hardware is any different than your current system. If you are worried that on your Skylake build Microsoft is going to say "Oh look this product key was previously used on a system that was upgraded to 10" it's not going to happen.
 

eloj

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I didn't say it's new bullshit, but it's still bullshit. Having a key and making sure it's not in use on multiple computers at the same time should be more than enough. No hardware hashing required.

Why should I have to throw away my current install just because I upgrade some of my hardware? It's like something out of the 90s ("oh no your chipset changed, your computer is all confused now!").

Anyone who thinks this song and dance isn't bullshit is so deep in it they're drowning.

No doubt it's going to overwrite my GRUB bootloader too, because you know MS can't play nice.
 

euskalzabe

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This is directly extracted from the win10 license agreement. The 4th point on Transfers, says:

b. Stand-alone software. If you acquired the software as stand-alone software (and also if you upgraded from software you acquired as stand-alone software), you may transfer the software to another device that belongs to you... Every time you transfer the software to a new device, you must remove the software from the prior device. You may not transfer the software to share licenses between devices.

Seems to suggest that even if we consider an upgraded PC a "different" PC, since you're the owner still, you could transfer your license from the "previous" PC to the upgraded one. Which suggests no change at all from how it has worked the past 20 years.
 

mope54

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The "change" is that you have to reinstall an earlier version of windows. Before, if I my motherboard shit the bed, I'd change it out and cross my fingers that I got all my previous drivers eradicated. If I started to have weird issues *then* I'd do a clean install.

But now? Now I have no choice. Change some hardware and I have to start all over from 7 or 8 at least for the first year. One possible workaround is to install to a different partition and upgrade that then see if the activation holds when switching back to the main partition install.

As far as piracy, it seems like every version of windows was freely available without too much pain and I fully expect 10 won't be much different.
 

zorobabel

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Here's my experience with fresh install so far:
Upgraded from Win7x64 HP to 10x64 using the iso (as nothing else worked, and even the iso took forever). Due to problems (booting windows 10 takes 15 minutes most of the time) I put in another hdd in the system and did a fresh install with w10x86 (time needed was as expected). I can't activate the fresh install - error "the activation server determined that the specified product key has been blocked". Key shown ends in 8HVX7. Microsoft indicates that after "major hardware changes, like replacing your hard drive or motherboard, windows might no longer be activated". HDDs crap out all the time nowadays, great move M$. I expect the next windows to lose activation when you change your keyboard.

Off topic:
The w10 video driver sucks, it won't recognize the Radeon X1650 pro (W7 and as I remember w8.1 recognized it). The dips*its at ATI only have drivers for XP and Vista. I'm using the Vista driver - probably the culprit for the 15 minutes boot.
 

mope54

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Sorry to hear that you ran into the same issues I experienced. Tiburian's argument in these threads has been to say that this should be resolvable with a quick call to MS, but that hasn't worked out for me.

If you can get it resolved with a call to MS please update the thread. If you can't, it might be worth a try what I suggested in the post right before yours: installing Win 8.1 to a partition on the same hard drive you just used and updating that to 10. That should, in theory, generate an activated hash for your new hardware configuration.

PITA for sure, but much better than wiping your current install and starting from scratch :\

P.S. Also, I noticed that your key is for Home. That was the problem with mine after a clean install. I had to go through a bunch of CLI steps to wipe that key and change the version to Pro before I could activate.
You might be able to resolve your issue by changing it to Pro since you don't actually have a Home license on record with MS (Your activated version was Pro previously, correct?).
 
D

Deleted member 245375

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Sorry to hear that you ran into the same issues I experienced. Tiburian's argument in these threads has been to say that this should be resolvable with a quick call to MS, but that hasn't worked out for me.

It's not my argument, it's what Microsoft states in their Windows 10 FAQ which I've quoted several times in the past few days so I'll quote it again here (with the relevant portion bolded and italicized):

Can I reinstall Windows 10 on my computer after upgrading?

Yes. Once you&#8217;ve upgraded to Windows 10 using the free upgrade offer, you will be able to reinstall, including a clean install, on the same device. You won&#8217;t need a product key for re-activations on the same hardware. If you make a meaningful change to your hardware, you may need to contact customer support to help with activation. You&#8217;ll also be able to create your own installation media like a USB drive or DVD, and use that to upgrade your device or reinstall after you&#8217;ve upgraded.

I'm using their own words (and what I've been told by friends who work at Microsoft in tech support who are fielding such calls with alarming frequency since July 29th) to get the point across: if you have any issues with activation at all with Windows 10, call Microsoft because they're the ones that know more about it than anyone including me. If someone at Microsoft is saying one thing and another person at Microsoft is saying something else, then their problem is communication internally and all the employees and support staff not being on the same page, so to speak.

I tell everyone the same thing, I always have: if you have a problem with activation with Windows - any version ever - call Microsoft because it's their product and they're the ones responsible for it.
 
D

Deleted member 245375

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Here's my experience with fresh install so far:
Upgraded from Win7x64 HP to 10x64 using the iso (as nothing else worked, and even the iso took forever). Due to problems (booting windows 10 takes 15 minutes most of the time) I put in another hdd in the system and did a fresh install with w10x86 (time needed was as expected). I can't activate the fresh install - error "the activation server determined that the specified product key has been blocked". Key shown ends in 8HVX7. Microsoft indicates that after "major hardware changes, like replacing your hard drive or motherboard, windows might no longer be activated". HDDs crap out all the time nowadays, great move M$. I expect the next windows to lose activation when you change your keyboard.

Off topic:
The w10 video driver sucks, it won't recognize the Radeon X1650 pro (W7 and as I remember w8.1 recognized it). The dips*its at ATI only have drivers for XP and Vista. I'm using the Vista driver - probably the culprit for the 15 minutes boot.

Just a question: when you did the very first install, the upgrade, did you verify the installation showed as activated once Windows 10 came up? If you didn't, and it wasn't, that's part of the problem: if it wasn't properly activated from the upgrade, it's not going to activate on a clean installation afterward (which you apparently decided to do with some haste I presume based on your pointing out the specific time durations).

The activation would not have failed because of a storage issue; a hard drive or SSD change isn't enough to trigger a need to re-activate the OS as long as the rest of the hardware is still the same (the motherboard being the most critical component obviously but this is well known).

As for the ATI driver issue, it has nothing to do with Windows 10 or Microsoft, that's all squarely on the shoulders of ATI/AMD. That video card is pretty damned old - nearly 10 years old now, and I've owned one, and I know that ATI/AMD basically gave up on supporting it past a few years into its lifespan, there's not much you're going to be able to do except get a card that's more current and supported - but don't get all pissy at Microsoft because you're having issues, the fault lies with the non-support from ATI/AMD.
 

mope54

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
7,449
No, MS FAQ are not self-posting all over the forums whenever someone reports an issue...it's your argument that you are making ad nauseum including jumping on my post as soon as it went up :rolleyes:

If you want to help this guy explain to him how to get his key switched over to Pro instead of Home because that's the more likely the issue instead of the hard drive.
For me, it wasn't as simple as clicking on the "Change Key" in settings. Maybe it will be that easy for him. I had to follow a series of CLI steps but I can't find all of them right now.

The steps I took entailed removing the key, wiping it from cache, and then another set of instructions involved deleting all of the update cache files and forcing an update check so it would "download" Pro.
Then the Pro key worked. It will either activate then or stumble on the hard drive, but getting it over to Pro is the first step (assuming your earlier post about that key being specific to Home is accurate).

Well, as for pot meeting kettle at least I'm giving helpful, practical advice rather than parroting MS FAQ that lead nowhere.
 
D

Deleted member 245375

Guest
No, MS FAQ are not self-posting all over the forums whenever someone reports an issue...it's your argument that you are making ad nauseum including jumping on my post as soon as it went up :rolleyes:

Ahem.

4y2dXkF.jpg
 
D

Deleted member 245375

Guest
No, MS FAQ are not self-posting all over the forums whenever someone reports an issue...it's your argument that you are making ad nauseum including jumping on my post as soon as it went up :rolleyes:

If you want to help this guy explain to him how to get his key switched over to Pro instead of Home because that's the more likely the issue instead of the hard drive.
For me, it wasn't as simple as clicking on the "Change Key" in settings. Maybe it will be that easy for him. I had to follow a series of CLI steps but I can't find all of them right now.

The steps I took entailed removing the key, wiping it from cache, and then another set of instructions involved deleting all of the update cache files and forcing an update check so it would "download" Pro.
Then the Pro key worked. It will either activate then or stumble on the hard drive, but getting it over to Pro is the first step (assuming your earlier post about that key being specific to Home is accurate).

Well, as for pot meeting kettle at least I'm giving helpful, practical advice rather than parroting MS FAQ that lead nowhere.

And editing your posts after the fact is a bit troublesome as well - you went from one line to paragraphs with the edit so whatever.

The problem lies with where you said it yourself:

If you want to help this guy explain to him how to get his key switched over to Pro instead of Home...

You can't just "switch over" to Pro from Home at will because that's not how the upgrade works - you have to upgrade FROM HOME TO HOME and FROM PRO TO PRO, you can't cross-upgrade between editions of the OS. Microsoft isn't giving people free EDITION upgrades, just upgrades of the current edition to the Windows 10 edition of the same type.

You stated that in another thread the other day that you had issues when "switching over" and I knew that was the heart of the problem right then and there and I'm still convinced that's where your problems started and still currently reside at. The moment you started mucking around with the command line and trying to alter the Product Keys is precisely the point where you broke things, like it or not.

I see no reason for me to alter that view at this point.
 

mope54

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
7,449
No, that wasn't the problem that was the solution.

Seriously, if you aren't going to help them GTFO the thread and quit shitting up the discussion. All you've been doing for the past few days is parroting FAQ that you dig up, giving people incorrect information, and then shitting on my posts that actually describe the issue and the solutions that I've found.

So just stop or put those 20 some odd years of technical support that you claim to have and give some advice other than "just call MS (and of course when you called your buddies they said their response was to tell people to reinstall Windows 7 or 8.1 :rolleyes:)

@zorobabel

The problem I ran into is that we activated Pro but when you do a clean install without using the Pro key (most instructions state to skip the key and if that's what you did then you might be experiencing the same issue as I did) it will default to a Home install. We don't have a Home license on record so it won't activate.

The first step, assuming you activated a Pro installation from your earlier upgrade, is to get your current version over to Pro.

I can not find the exact page I used to completely get rid of the current Home key.
It was something like this:
http://hiddenfew.blogspot.com/2012/09/change-windows-7-product-key-via-cmd.html

I actually used about six commands but those should at least get rid of it.
The problem being that when you try to change it to a Pro key you'll get a non-core edition error because you'll be trying to use a Pro license on a Home install.

You want to try and get this key VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T to take.

In order to get my Home to Pro I followed these steps after getting rid of the Home key:
http://venturebeat.com/2015/07/28/h...tart-downloading-the-windows-10-update-files/

After I did that my Pro version activated on my laptop.

Calling MS resulted in them RDP'ing into my desktop, trying to change my key manually, change my Installation ID manually, and then after I told them I had experienced a hardware failure they explained they were unable to change my hardware hash manually and to reinstall Windows 8.1 and update to 10.


The alternative to all this is something that I haven't tried, which is to shrink the partition, create a new partition, install to that new partition (either by windows 7 to 10 upgrade path, or clean 10 install but making sure to use the Pro key rather than skipping the key entry), and then seeing if that generates a hash that activates the first partition. I'm actually going to try that right now on my desktop and I'll report back in a bit.

I don't know if that will work because I don't know if the hash will be different from partition to partition. That's presumably something Tiburian *could* answer if he wasn't so hell bent on responding to my posts with: here's MS faq, call MS if you have a problem, what mope54 did to get his installation activated isn't accurate :rolleyes:
 

mope54

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
7,449
You can't just "switch over" to Pro from Home at will because that's not how the upgrade works - you have to upgrade FROM HOME TO HOME and FROM PRO TO PRO, you can't cross-upgrade between editions of the OS. Microsoft isn't giving people free EDITION upgrades, just upgrades of the current edition to the Windows 10 edition of the same type.

You stated that in another thread the other day that you had issues when "switching over" and I knew that was the heart of the problem right then and there and I'm still convinced that's where your problems started and still currently reside at. The moment you started mucking around with the command line and trying to alter the Product Keys is precisely the point where you broke things, like it or not.

I see no reason for me to alter that view at this point.
He (and I) upgraded from 7 or 8.1 Pro to Windows 10 Pro

If you follow the instructions to do a clean install, but don't use a Pro license (since they all say it's not necessary and to just press "Skip") it clean installs a Home version for some reason (that's what happened to me anyway and, based on the key he just posted, for him too).

That's why the version won't activate...and also creates an issue when people try to put a Pro license into a Home install.

You have to clear the Home key, get the Pro key to take (which is where the struggle arises since the Pro key errors out as a product mismatch) and then update the version to Pro via Windows Update.
 
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