Does a GPU produce heat when integrated graphics are running and GPU is in "idle" state?

Discussion in 'Video Cards' started by oblongpolygon, Feb 24, 2018.

  1. oblongpolygon

    oblongpolygon [H]Lite

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    Does a GPU, like a Strix, produce heat when integrated graphics is running, such as during web browsing?

    For example, I believe the integrated graphics of the Intel 8700 handles the graphics during undemanding desktop tasks - like web browsing.

    At those times, you'd imagine that a Strix 1080 would be described as "idle" and that the fans wouldn't be spinning... but is the Strix still producing heat, at that time?

    So, when members on these forums talk about a card being "idle", do they mean that it's not producing any heat?

    Or do they just mean that it's running at such a low level, that the fans don't spin?

    This would seem to matter for me, because I'm trying to work out if a Strix is going to be generating heat when the integrated graphics will be handling things, which is 95% of the time, for me.
     
  2. Gorankar

    Gorankar [H]ardForum Junkie

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    If there is power running through it, it is generating some heat. At idle it is simply generating less heat, (in some case that is still a considerable amount), that when running at full speed.

    Unless you have a laptop running some hybrid setup, usually the integrated is idle, when there is a addon card plugged into your system. Your 1080 is likely always providing the output if that is the one your monitor is plugged into. Even in 2d tasks.
     
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  3. opfreak

    opfreak Gawd

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    why are you worried about the small amount of heat produced while idle?
     
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  4. razor1

    razor1 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    at idle depending on the card, should only produce 10-15 watts of heat, its really not that much,

    The 1080 any 1080 for that matter at idle is less than 10 watts of power consumption.
     
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  5. oblongpolygon

    oblongpolygon [H]Lite

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    I find that really interesting - I thought the integrated graphics would be handling most desktop tasks! And maybe even light CAD modeling too.

    That aside - thanks for the info! So, okay, always producing some heat - but considerably less than when under load. Thanks for this info.

    So, even when "idle" a GPU is potentially warming the case up - gotcha!


    I ask because I'm trying to make decisions about a SFF build, and I only game maybe 5% of the time that the computer is on.

    So, I'm concerned about the heat created during the remaining 95% of the time, when the integrated graphics is doing the work, and the GPU is "idle".

    And this leads me to wonder about whether a a blower style card, or an open-air style card is better - because one is always expelling heat, whereas the other may not even be spinning its fans even when generating heat.


    Thanks for the watts detail... although, as I'm new to this stuff, I still don't yet know how to "quantify" or think of that amount, as heat.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2018
  6. razor1

    razor1 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    a 100 watt heater can lift up an office cubical about 2 degrees. really depends on the size of the room, air flow etc. 10 watts isn't going to do anything though ;)
     
  7. oblongpolygon

    oblongpolygon [H]Lite

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    I think your feedback is making me less nervous about a Strix in the Dan A4 v2...

    Initially, I believed that I needed a blower style card, to exhaust the heat generated during desktop tasks, which is 95% of the time, when the card is still actually producing some heat.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2018
  8. razor1

    razor1 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    if that case can pull decent air though the front or side (if its got a side vent), its not problem even when the card is being used at full tilt. Idle no issue at all. I have a asus founder's edition 1080ti in my gaming system, that computer is always on, weekends some days, I"m playing like 6 hours straight, I only have two case fans, one pulling air in from the front and one exhausting air in the back, no temp problems at all. At stock voltages the chip stays around 75 C, but I undervolt so it goes down to 50 C.

    The strix actually has even better cooling than the founder's edition, so if your case has good ventilation, its not even an issue for a gtx 1080, the 1080 pulls 180 watts max on full tilt, also you can undervolt the card easily too.

    Idle no issues at all.

    On my dev system, which has a titan xp, I modeled with 3ds max and Maya, so its running idle when modelling, mid tower case two fans, just like my gaming system, no issue there. Now if I was to game on that, in the summer time and don't have ac on it will raise up the temps a bit cause its got a dual boardwell 10 core chips. So it sucks quite a bit of power and puts out a lot of heat. 800 watts or so while gaming. Of course its got 6 mechanical hard drives too.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2018
  9. oblongpolygon

    oblongpolygon [H]Lite

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    That bit is really interesting, for me, since 95% of my PC uptime is in similar modeling / CAD software... and only 5% of my uptime would be gaming.

    So naturally, I'm more "concerned" about what the GPU does (in terms of heat / noise) during the 95% of my uptime, when using modeling software.

    I'm in a Dan A4 v2, so I believe I don't have good ventilation.

    However, maybe this isn't an issue, as you and others are saying a Strix remains idle during modeling / CAD tasks, and generating little heat.

    Thanks for alerting me to the possibility of "undervolting" - if heat generated during my 5% gaming uptime, or 95% of modeling uptime, becomes an issue, then I can undervolt the card, so... it generates less heat? That's the point, right?
     
  10. razor1

    razor1 [H]ardForum Junkie

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    ah ok, I'm not familiar with that case but it really shouldn't be an issue

    yeah undervolting will also drop power consumption down while gaming or anything intensive for that mater, anywhere from 10 to 20%, it really helps drop the heat output by the same amount. Definitely an option for ya if it becomes a problem.