Dell UltraSharp U3415W Curved 34" IPS 21:9 3440 x 1440 monitor -- Impressions

Discussion in 'Displays' started by silent-circuit, Nov 28, 2015.

  1. silent-circuit

    silent-circuit [H]ardForum Junkie

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    I'll go ahead and get it out of the way -- over all, I'm very happy with this thing. After going through 4 different 40 and 43" 4K TVs under $1000 trying to find a good PC monitor and having to give up on each for a different reason (firmware issues, blurring, input lag, bad black levels, etc) I think I've finally found something I can live with for many years to come that doesn't feel in any way like a step down from my previous Planar PX2611w, which is going to be relegated to secondary display duty once I get a new stand so it can be mounted in portrait next to this thing.

    Are there things I wish were better? Sure. I'll go over those in detail at some point, and if people care enough I'll add pictures as well. For now, I'll just walk through my impressions and the pros and cons of this particular display as I see them.

    Also, yes. I know this is long. There's a lot to say.





    Dell UltraSharp U3415W Curved 34" IPS 21:9 3440 x 1440 monitor -- Impressions


    Packaging, Contents, and Assembly:

    The Dell U3415W is insanely well packed. I have joked with friends that the box it comes in could double as a coffin for toddlers -- if you haven't picked it up after reading stuff I've posted here over the years, I'm a terrible person.

    At 39"x20"x12" the box is gigantic, with shipping weight listed as 40lb, and I believe them after carrying it around the house. There's tons of cardboard inside and closed cell foam wedges to keep the panel and stand from moving, then a bag over the panel and a further sheet of reinforced bubble-wrap type stuff taped over the screen front as well.

    All the manuals, the driver CD, and various cables are in a smaller box inside the main box. Dell includes a power cord (standard 3 prong PSU cable, no external brick, easily replaced), high-speed HDMI cable, and a mini-DisplayPort to full size DisplayPort cable as well. This last choice is nice in that the monitor has two full size DisplayPorts and a single mini-DisplayPort, so no matter if your GPU or other source uses full size DP or mini-DP you have the cable you need.

    The box has pictogram unpacking instructions on the first flap you see when opening the main seal. These are easy to follow -- turn it so the monitor is face down, take out the stand, accessories/cables, and the cardboard dividers, then take the monitor out of the bag and click the stand in to place on its back with it still face down in the box.





    Materials and Build Quality:

    The stand is very sturdy and well made, with a fair bit of height and tilt adjustment. Its rubber feet are very grippy and avoid the monitor sliding around, and there's no visable wobble when typing quickly even on my fairly flimsy desk. I do wish the maximum adjustment was a little higher as it doesn't quite get to eye level with me, but this is more the fault of my desk and chair setup than the monitor itself. There's no portrait orientation option with the included stand, but as wide as a 34" 21:9 display is most wouldn't want to do that anyway -- you would end up with a sore neck very quickly. The stand is also easy to install on the display, requiring no tools -- it simply snaps in to place. A small spring-loaded button on the back of the display allows the stand to be detached easily if you want to use an aftermarket VESA mount (there are standard 100x100mm mount points) or for storage / re-boxing.

    As is the standard for Dell's UltraSharp line, the casing is no frills and very well made, all matte black plastic on the front and back of the panel, silver for the stand. The back of the display is curved to match the front and slightly convex, which I imagine would look nice if you had it on a desk in the middle of a room or office. There's a small plastic snap-on panel included to hide display connections that I didn't bother to install as my monitor is up against a wall, but this helps clean up the look of it in some cases. There's also a pass-through hole for cable management in the stand. The Dell logo in the center of the bottom logo is small and tasteful, made of shiny silver plastic.

    There are two down-firing speakers built in to the display as well as a 4 port USB 3.0 hub with two upstream connections allowing you to connect two systems to the same peripherals by way of the monitor -- convenient if you want to use it in PiP/PbP mode regularly. There are options in the OSD to assign different USB upstream connections to different display inputs, letting the display act as a sort of limited KVM. There is also an option to leave the USB ports powered when the display is off, letting them be used to charge your phone or run small USB accessories even when the display itself is not in use. I have yet to use the speakers or USB hub, but can test them on request.

    Inputs include 2 full size DisplayPort connections, one of which is used to daisy-chain multiple DP compatible panels if you go that route. There's also a mini DisplayPort, a HDMI 2.0 port, and a MHL port for connecting mobile devices. This means any of the inputs can support the display's full resolution at 60Hz, but depending on the connected device you may not be able to get above 1920x1080@60Hz (in the case of MHL devices that don't support MHL 3.0) or 3440x1440@50Hz (HDMI 1.4a sources). For this reason, you should be sure to use DisplayPort if your GPU supports it, but if you have a HDMI 2.0 capable GPU (at this point, Nvidia GTX 900 series and later) it doesn't matter if you use DP or HDMI.





    Factory Calibration:

    Also included in the box is a calibration report from the factory -- I can't overstate how awesome this is, and it's the first I've seen with any monitor I've owned. Dell guarantees an average Delta E (color accuracy) of less than 3 and takes readings at the factory of 8 points of gray, 4 red, 4 green, 4 blue, 4 yellow, 4 magenta and 4 cyan. On my unit most of these readings showed a Delta E of less than 1, and none were more than ~1.5.

    The gray scale tracking performance and gamma curve of the display after calibration are also included, as well as backlight uniformity readings at 21 points across the screen and Delta E color uniformity readings at 21 points relative to center.

    While I still strongly recommend buying a colorimeter if you do photo/video editing or other professional quality work on the display, having it extremely well calibrated from the factory saves a ton of time and potential frustration. I did a few quick tests with my own colorimeter and results were consistent with the factory readings across the board, so the U3415W really is ready to go out of the box.





    Setup, First Impressions, and Comparison to Planar PX2611w:

    Setup is pretty much effortless on any modern OS -- I never bothered with the driver CD, instead simply connecting the included mini-DP to DP cable between my primary Geforce GTX 980Ti and the display and booting up Windows 7 to see its native resolution set automatically. I've since upgraded to Windows 10 and had no issues there either. Default calibration is, as stated before, exceptional -- colors are true to life, not muted or overblown (think over-saturated OLED -- none of that here). After turning the brightness down to 50 from the default 75 I found there was really nothing else that needed adjusting -- a very different experience than I've had with other displays. It's worth noting that while less expensive displays often start flickering noticeably below 100% brightness, like most of the high end 34" 21:9 displays the U3415W does not use PWM to adjust its backlight brightness, but DC control. This means it is "flicker free" and will not bother those sensitive to PWM flicker at any brightness level.

    For comparison purposes I used my Planar PX2611w. This is a 1920x1200 16:10 CCFL-backlit wide gamut IPS display built in 2009 with 6ms GTG response time and less than 1 frame of input lag. It uses the same panel as the NEC LCD2960WUXi. I will readily admit to loving this display and have had a very difficult time finding a worthy replacement.

    I went through a few 24MP photos from my fiancee's Sony Alpha a5100 on the Dell and the Planar to compare color quality, and found the Dell a bit more rich but not overdone. This may be in part to the Planar's age (it is dimming a bit) but is none-the-less impressive. Blacks are a little deeper on the Dell, but IPS glow is more apparent on the sides due to its substantially greater width. Backing up takes care of the glow, but staying relatively close and letting the display fill the bulk of your field of view is where it really shines, so it's a worthwhile trade-off. Still, outside of a completely black screen where you find yourself looking for it, the glow isn't so intense as to be distracting. With the far better color accuracy of IPS when compared with other display technologies, even SVA, it's something I've been willing to deal with the few times it has proven a (minor) issue. I love deep, deep blacks, which has never been the biggest strength of IPS tech, but I hate gamma and color shift with a passion so I stick with it.

    Initially I was concerned the Dell might be a little more blurry than the Planar given its reported 8ms response time vs. the Planar's 6ms. This proved to be unfounded -- worst case they're neck and neck, best case the Dell is a bit faster, though not night-and-day under any circumstances. Coming from me, this is high praise -- again, I love the PX2611w, I would argue it is one of the best TFT displays ever made. In the case of the U3415W I suspect that Dell is being conservative with the response time numbers as usual, while other manufacturers stretch the truth a bit to appeal to the "lower ms is better" crowd.

    I was also somewhat worried about input lag -- the Planar, when I purchased it, had possibly the lowest input lag of any readily available IPS display on the market, at under one frame. Thankfully, the Dell matches or exceeds this, and does not feel any slower in practice.

    All in all, I've been very happy with the gaming and photo/video performance of this display. I realize it's not 144 or even 90Hz, but I'm not a pro gamer and it's plenty fast for me. Given how unimpressed I've been with TN panels even after all the advances they've made in recent years there are sacrifices I'm willing to make to get the image I want -- I'd much rather have games and films look great and play well than be washed out and color-shifted but "smoother." My distrust of TNs extends all the way up to the $600 Samsung U28D590D 28" 4K TN, which has all kinds of software tricks built in to try and avoid the shortfalls of TN technology. Despite this, the 590D was still a horrific washed out mess after my best attempts to calibrate it and lasted all of 3 days before being returned. If you must have 1ms response time, 144Hz, G-sync/FreeSync, etc, this display isn't for you. If you can accept a quality 60Hz panel with minimal blurring and want a really good image more than anything else, consider it.





    21:9 for Movies and Games:

    Nothing said in this section is specific to the Dell, but is universally applicable to 21:9 displays, at least for now. Hopefully as they become more prevalent over the next year or two we will see increasingly good support across the board for the 21:9 aspect ratio.

    Watching films with a 21:9 monitor is a whole new experience -- the total lack of letter-boxing, the ability to use the entire panel, it oddly makes a bigger impression with a 34" 21:9 than a 40" 4K set in my experience, even if the resulting image is a bit smaller. There's something about having the film all the way out to the bezels that just feels right. That is, of course, when it works. If you're working with local content it's easy enough to use VLC Media Player or similar to force 21:9 or crop hard-coded black bars, but dealing with streaming content is trickier. There's a Chrome extension called UltraWide Video that handles this with an easy ctrl-alt-c shortcut to toggle cropping modes and avoid black bars on Netflix and Youtube content. Amazon is more hit and miss -- some of the streaming content is already properly encoded and fills the screen perfectly, while other films are actually boxed on all sides and just "float" in the middle of the display. This is really more the fault of the content providers, not properly taking the 21:9 aspect ratio in to account, but it's something to consider if you're planning to buy a 21:9 monitor to watch films.


    A big thing you should be aware of and ready to deal with if you choose this (or any other 21:9 display, for that matter) with gaming in mind is that a certain amount of mucking around with cfg and ini files will sometimes be necessary to get things working properly, particularly with older titles. Some will simply refuse to run at native resolution or aspect ratio -- in that case the OSD does allow unstretched 1:1 mapping and forcing 16:9 so you can play at 1920x1080 for example in the middle of the screen with black bars on the side for problem titles. While this is far from ideal, keep in mind that it's effectively the same size as a 27" 16:9 display. The four "stretch" options in the OSD are 21:9 forced, 16:9 forced, 1:1, and "Auto". The remainder of the OSD is straightforward and easy to navigate using the 4 context-aware touch-sensitive buttons on the bottom-right corner of the display. If you're curious about the OSD layout and other options, checking out Youtube is probably the best way to go, rather than trying to type everything out here. Suffice it to say it's not bad, not amazing. You'll rarely have to use it. There's also a dedicated power button. The power LED can be disabled while the screen is on if you find it distracting, but I find the fairly muted diffuse white light pleasant.

    Many newer titles have native 21:9 support, and many need tweaking. Some it's as simple as going in to the config files and manually tweaking the resolution or FOV. Others can be "fixed" with the third party application Flawless Widescreen. It's worth noting here that in my limited experience with Flawless Widescreen it's far from foolproof -- while the Dragon Age Inquisition plugin for it does get rid of the letter-boxing in cut scenes, it has also caused hard crashes and blue screens at times. The point here is, it's a great experience over all, but I acknowledge it isn't without flaws, and you should be prepared for that going in. It's kind of like SLI or Crossfire X -- does it give you a better gaming experience? 90% of the time, yeah. Maybe 75% if you're feeling pessimistic. Is it a pain in the ass sometimes? Sure. Do you deal with it anyway cause it's the best option available to you and you love gaming with everything cranked up to the max? Yeah. Let's be honest -- on top of that, some of us really enjoy tinkering with this stuff.





    Pros and Cons:

    Pros:
    - Excellent color accuracy out of the box, great factory calibration and detailed calibration report included in box
    - Good black levels for IPS display
    - Flicker-free (DC brightness control, no PWM)
    - Very solid build quality, including stand
    - 3 year warranty is best in class, most competitors offer 1 year
    - Large variety of input options (2 DP, 1 mDP, 1 HDMI, 1 MHL)

    Cons:
    - Fairly high price between $750 and $900 depending on vendor/sales/promo codes/etc
    - No DVI-D or VGA connection, unlike some competitors (AOC), means it will not work with older PCs
    - Reported 8ms GTG response time, while likely conservative, is much higher than competitors reporting 4-5ms
    - Some users / reviewers report backlight bleed in upper left and right corners / especially heavy IPS glow (did not see this in my unit)


    Pro or Con (Preference):
    - "Corporate" color and material choices, not flashy
    - No external power brick means easier setup with nothing to hide, but makes repair more complicated in case of PSU failure and casing thicker to accommodate internal PSU
    - Excellent packaging means giant, odd shaped box to store away in case of moving or sale in the future
    - Price is "middle of the pack" -- less than the LG curved 34" IPS 21:9 panel, more than Samsung curved 34" SVA 21:9, and more than the AOC & LG flat 34" IPS 21:9 panels






    Tips: (will update as I learn)
    - If watching ultra-widescreen original content in VLC you may need to set a 6 pixel top, 6 pixel bottom crop to have the film completely fill the display left to right. Yes, you're losing 12 lines of vertical resolution but I think it's worth it to avoid /any/ unused black area.

    - when working with 2 windows you can snap them to the left and right sides of the screen using Win+left arrow and Win+right arrow keys. That way you can have a browser and Word (for example) open and readable without having to manually resize them with the mouse. I suspect many people already know this shortcut, but it was new to me.

    - Mentioned above, but likely lost in a sea of text for many -- there's a Chrome extension called "UltraWide Video" that will let you crop full screen Youtube and Netflix streams with ctrl+alt+c to fill the whole screen with no black bars. I think something similar is also available for Firefox. It's worth noting that the extension is far from perfect/foolproof, but better than nothing in my experience.


    I welcome other U3415W owners to post their own impressions here, as well as anyone considering the display to ask questions. I'll be glad to respond.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
  2. silent-circuit

    silent-circuit [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Also, anyone who wades through all (or even some) of the above, I'd love honest responses / constructive criticism. It has been years since I wrote a review this thorough, and I realize there's a lot more I could still add.
     
  3. Archaea

    Archaea [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Thanks for the review.

    I've used some triple monitor setups in the past and have noticed that the outside monitors experience stretching due to FOV issues.

    Have you encountered that in games yet?

    Also do you feel the left most HUDs and right most HUDs are too far out of your central vision to be of use? For instance if there is a radar in a game and it's tucked away in one of the corners Is it too far out of the way to be of use during fast game play?
     
  4. silent-circuit

    silent-circuit [H]ardForum Junkie

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    It might be there, but it's not strong enough for me to notice in the few games I've had a chance to try so far. I'll let you know if I see this in the future. I suspect it will be a problem in some titles, but less likely than a triple monitor setup since the horizontal resolution isn't /too/ crazy high relative to the vertical. If you run triple 1080P that's (1920x3)x1080, or 5760x1080. 48:9 (my math may be off here, but you get the point?). The viewable area, depending on the size of panels used, might not be much bigger than the U3415W, but it's much more pixel dense along the horizontal axis and less dense along the vertical. Switching to 1440P panels the ratio stays the same but the pixel density goes up and your GPU(s) cry themselves to sleep at night.

    It's not ideal for everything to be pushed to the sides, but it's workable depending how far you sit back from the monitor. Some newer titles automatically move UI elements closer to center screen when running at 21:9, and some older games have patches or community-developed mods to accomplish the same thing. As I said in the review, worst case scenario if the UI is too spread out to use you can always switch to forced 16:9 in the OSD and set the game resolution to 1920x1080 or 2560x1440. This will give you screen area equivalent to a 27" 16:9 display, but that's obviously a last-ditch kind of thing.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2015
  5. RTbar

    RTbar n00b

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    Thanks for the review, I just ordered mine so this thread is exactly what I was looking for. How is general web browsing with just one window open? Is there a way to place a window in the middle of the monitor for the times when you don't need more than one window open?
     
  6. silent-circuit

    silent-circuit [H]ardForum Junkie

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    No problem, glad it's proving helpful. Let me know if there's anything else you want to know.

    Web browsing isn't bad but yeah, a single full screen browser window can look strange on some sites. The "reply" window on [H] takes ~1/5 the horizontal area, for example, and that's not even a "bad" one. If you resize the window to 1/2-1/3 the screen width it starts looking more normal. The display may have come with some software to help with this, but honestly I haven't even looked at the CD in the box or the Dell downloads for it. I know there are third party "snap to grid" type programs out there, and I may look in to them now that I have a reason to consider them.
     
  7. alxlwson

    alxlwson You Know Where I Live

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    Great review! I'm sold!
     
  8. RTbar

    RTbar n00b

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    What made you pick the dell over the samsung 34" curved? I'm debating whether to cancel my order and get the samsung, because I don't want to deal with having to RMA if there is bad backlight bleed.
     
  9. silent-circuit

    silent-circuit [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Several things, some I feel more important than others.

    First, the Dell has excellent out-of-the-box calibration, which saved me having to mess with ICC profiles and such with my colorimeter for hours to get it right. It also has generally better color accuracy than the Samsung, at least according to some reviews, so that's a plus.

    It comes with a 3 year warranty rather than the 1 year warranties offered by Samsung / LG / AOC. While in my experience displays either arrive defective or fail soon after purchase, not years later, it's still nice to have the piece of mind when talking about a purchase of this size. The best part about the warranty is that it covers even a single stuck bright pixel -- you can RMA for that, and Dell will take care of it. This can't be said for any competitors.

    Being IPS, it doesn't suffer from black crush, inverse ghosting, or gamma shift present with VA technology. Unfortunately it does not have as deep of black levels, but this is a trade off I determined I was willing to make for, primarily, greater color accuracy.

    The LG curved 34" 3440x1440 IPS 21:9 was a good $100 more than the Dell, putting it outside my price range. Since I decided I wanted a curved panel, that narrowed it down to the Dell and Samsung. The recent return of a 28" Samsung 4K TN I'd picked up for testing left me with a bad taste in my mouth, and I prize color accuracy (I'm also an amateur photographer) so I went with the Dell.

    In the end the biggest thing is your personal preference, IPS or SVA panel.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2015
  10. harsaphes

    harsaphes [H]ardness Supreme

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    How's the screen coating?
     
  11. kraken0698

    kraken0698 Gawd

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    Great write up! I agree with your assessment.

    I actually just finished comparing the U3415W and the S34E790C. Yes, I bought both of them at the same time and compared them side by side. I took some photos of them as well, which I may post later.

    Impressions: Initially, the U3415W was a bit disappointing mainly due to the IPS glow and BLB in 3 of the corners. However, this only really manifests itself on really dark scenes and I sit close enough to my monitor so that it basically fills my entire field of view. Therefore, my eyes are drawn to center of the screen and extra real estate is used to fill my peripheral vision. While using the monitor I do not notice the glow or the BLB at all and only see it if there is a dark scene and I actively look for it.

    Aside from these issues, the display itself is fantastic. It is tack sharp, with excellent colors and great viewing angles. Gaming with this display is a treat. I have had no issues with input lag or ghosting. Fallout 4 is amazing on this monitor. I frequently catch myself playing with my mouth open in amazement. That is not an exaggeration, I am in awe of this monitor.

    Oh and the stand is great and the OSD is easy to use. It just feels well built.

    Now, to the S34E790C - I only purchased this on an impulse after I had the U3415W. My previous display (FG2421) was a VA panel and I really liked the contrast levels on that monitor so I thought the Samsung would be comparable. Was it? Well....

    ...First impressions of the Samsung were that the viewing angles of this monitor were going to be an issue. Looking dead center was good, but any deviation from that and there was what I can only describe as a 'haze', especially along the sides.

    As for BLB and IPS glow, there was none, so that was a definite plus. Gaming was just as responsive as the Dell it seemed with no ghosting. Also, the stand seemed well built and while I'm not a fan of an external power brick for a monitor, it didn't bother me that much here. I was not a big fan of the joystick OSD controls on the Samsung however. It seemed totally unnecessary and I found it quite difficult to use. Overall, the build quality of the Samsung seemed quite good.

    So, which one did I keep?

    Short answer - The U3415W

    Long Answer - Well, saying it was an easy decision would be a lie. I went back and forth several times between the two. They each had pluses and minuses.

    Ultimately, the decision was made after I was all set to keep the Samsung. Yeah, that's right. I had the Samsung hooked up and was getting ready to box up the Dell to return it and I decided to hook up the Dell one last time and fire up Fallout 4. When I did that, I noticed something I hadn't before. The Dell seemed sharper and weirdly enough there seemed to be more detail in the dark areas than on the Samsung, which is a VA panel.

    I quickly hooked the Samsung back up and compared the exact same scene. Sure enough, the Samsung had a softer image. I couldn't put my finger on it, but it seemed that there was a slight blur to everything. It was also at this time that I noticed the viewing angle problem and the haze again. Now, this really bothered me as the Dell didn't have either of these issues.

    After swapping a few more times, it became clear (no pun intended) that the Dell was going to be the winner. Even with some BLB and a bit of IPS glow, this monitor is fantastic.

    So, bottom line - both displays are good, even great. To me however, the 'haze' and softness of the Samsung was just too much. When going to the Dell from the Samsung, it's like I put on glasses, everything was noticeably clearer.

    If I had never compared the two I would have been perfectly happy with the Samsung, so ignorance can be bliss especially when it involves awesome monitors.
     
  12. silent-circuit

    silent-circuit [H]ardForum Junkie

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    I barely notice it, but then I'm used to the more aggressive coating on the Planar PX2611w, so others may be screaming "why so grainy" for all I know.
     
  13. silent-circuit

    silent-circuit [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Thanks for adding your impressions! It seems we're on the same page; while I got very lucky (apparently) and my unit has no noticeable backlight bleed in the corners, the glow is (as I said above) more obvious than on my smaller PX2611w, but like you I don't notice it unless it's a very dark scene and I'm looking for it.

    Lack of detail in darker areas is caused by limitations in VA tech; reviewers often refer to it as "black crush". Not having the Samsung in front of me to check it out, I had to go on what reviewers said, and most claimed there was little to no black crush with that panel -- based on what you're saying there's at least enough to make it noticeable, so I'm all the more glad I went will the Dell. :)
     
  14. kraken0698

    kraken0698 Gawd

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    You are very lucky to get one without BLB. There are many with BLB in the corners, like mine. However, the overall quality of the monitor just makes that disappear when I'm using it. It still bugs me that it's there, but until we have OLED monitors, that's just going to have to be a fact of life.
     
  15. silent-circuit

    silent-circuit [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Just a quick update. Previously, I stated the U3415W had 2 HDMI 2.0 ports -- I was wrong, it only has one. I doubt this was going to be a huge selling point for anyone, as this is primarily a PC monitor and you'd probably be connecting the PC via DisplayPort and a secondary device like a console (if anything) via HDMI, but thought it was a big enough error to correct and point out. Sorry if anyone was misled.

    I've edited the original text to remove the error.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
  16. 2k3eblade

    2k3eblade Gawd

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    Thank for the review and the tip for the chrome extension. It's great I can fill my whole screen for netflix and youtube.