Crysis Warhead Already Suffering Spore's Fate

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mope54

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WTF are you going on about? Smart enough to discuss ISOs? As if creating an ISO image from a game disc is difficult? As opposed to creating an image of the hard drive.


Sure buddy, whatever you say. Go play with your DRM-infested crapfest, uh, I mean games, now please ;)

ROFL, sorry I overestimated your intelligence.

hopefully someone else comes along and kindergarten's it for you
 

Raudulfr

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ROFL, sorry I overestimated your intelligence.

hopefully someone else comes along and kindergarten's it for you

No, you're just thick really. I was merely stating that the average user has no problem creating an ISO image but would shy away from creating images of his harddrive, not that I didn't know how to.


Troll.
 

mope54

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I'm not a troll, you're just a dolt

the "average" user has his/her operating system already imaged from the factory.
and xp/vista image the drive by default.

try again
 

mope54

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try reading a timestamp you fucking tard
discussion was over and done with six hours before you swaggered in with your shriveled e-peen.
 

Riftsaw

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Well you guys should be happy now :http://ve3d.ign.com/articles/news/41661/Crysis-Warhead-Activation-De-Authorisation-Tool-Announced

Spore is also getting one , so looks like EA is doing the right thing for once and listening to there consumers.

Interesting. Didn't this same thing happen with Mass Effect? They made a MINOR change(the game doesn't ping activaction servers everytime you start now! it only pings once a week!) and everyone was like "WE WON! WOOO!!" and you ain't hear shit about Mass Effect's DRM since?

Or maybe I'm mis-remembering.

If this cycle has to happen everytime a game under EA is released theres no "they listened to us and did the right thing."
 

CrimsonKnight13

Lord Stabington of [H]ard|Fortress
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It should be that EA listens to customers & doesn't implement DRM in the way that they do to create another drama riot everywhere.
 

Godmachine

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Interesting. Didn't this same thing happen with Mass Effect? They made a MINOR change(the game doesn't ping activaction servers everytime you start now! it only pings once a week!) and everyone was like "WE WON! WOOO!!" and you ain't hear shit about Mass Effect's DRM since?

Or maybe I'm mis-remembering.

If this cycle has to happen everytime a game under EA is released theres no "they listened to us and did the right thing."

No its more like the tool 2k Boston released for Bioshock that stripped it of the Securom DRM check each time it started up. Its a step in the right direction and in this case , bitching and moaning have made a big difference.

You can say it doesn't matter but I bet you right now if it wasn't for the hundreds of 1 star reviews on places like Amazon, EA wouldn't have done this.
 

Riftsaw

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No its more like the tool 2k Boston released for Bioshock that stripped it of the Securom DRM check each time it started up. Its a step in the right direction and in this case , bitching and moaning have made a big difference.

You can say it doesn't matter but I bet you right now if it wasn't for the hundreds of 1 star reviews on places like Amazon, EA wouldn't have done this.

No no, far from it actually. I'm saying if those who actively voiced their displeasure with the DRM(I did as well but I also still bought the game so I don't think I can really take much if any credit in this) have to do so EVERYTIME an EA published game is released for them to pull back a bit on the restrictions then theres no way EA has learned its lesson.

Progress has been made but if EA has you start from the beginning everytime a game is released you're not making much headway in the longrun.

The gist of what I'm saying is is that this is not enough.
 

Godmachine

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No no, far from it actually. I'm saying if those who actively voiced their displeasure with the DRM(I did as well but I also still bought the game so I don't think I can really take much if any credit in this) have to do so EVERYTIME an EA published game is released for them to pull back a bit on the restrictions then theres no way EA has learned its lesson.

Progress has been made but if EA has you start from the beginning everytime a game is released you're not making much headway in the longrun.

The gist of what I'm saying is is that this is not enough.

I agree with you there , EA needs to take this as a big lesson, I believe they will this time because it wasn't a game that was lower profile .. Spore has been on everyone's waiting list for years and there was TONS of hype around it. The bad press on it exposed EA in a way they aren't use to dealing with , sure we all call them a big overpowerd crappy company but they are use to it so they throw us a bone once in awhile to keep us thinking we made a difference. This time around its not that simple and with people willingly bashing them to massive retailers like Amazon means they have no choice but to start taking us seriously.
 

mope54

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EA isn't going to learn anything from this, ROFL.
Do you guys even read the press releases from the companies you're complaining about?

Honestly, how do you have an informed opinion about something you're not paying very close attention to?

The short and long of it is that this decision was beneficial to both Crytek and EA.
In their estimation, they successfully warded theft of their product until after the critical launch of their product. You can choose to believe them or not, but the official word is this was a success.
 

Riftsaw

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I can see it now. The price of new EA PC games is going to go up by $10 and they're going to include a hardware USB security key in each case that you must hook up to your PC anytime you want to play that specific game.

It will finally thwart piracy... for 2 weeks...
 

Godmachine

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Well its fine if you don't think it made a difference but honestly big companys like EA have to listen to stock holders and the stock holders don't like ANYTHING that dips there profit margin regardless of how small. At some point in the future a more realistic solution will come forward and work out for everyone, but right now we just have to deal with it. EA is basicly encourging piracy with this type of DRM and you can bet that its on someone's mind with the higher up's , so I wouldn't count on this just fading in the public's mind and nothing coming of it. When casual users take time out of there day to complain about it .. you can bet that holds far more weight than a small group of bitchy hardcore gamers.
 

Daggah

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lol, 5 years ago these exact arguments were raised about steam.
you'd be hard pressed to find a positive post about steam...now it seems tons of people love it except for some old-school stragglers who haven't gotten the message that it's the best thing since sliced bread :\

You want to know the key difference between Steam and SecuROM as DRM? Because yes, Steam IS DRM. But Steam is a different type of DRM. It protects the content while simultaneously giving the user something in return. Instead of protecting content by limiting the user, it in fact gives the user more options. Yeah, you have to authenticate HL2 online before you can play it. But in exchange you get the ability to conveniently reinstall Half-Life 2 on any computer that you can log into Steam on.

Steam shows how DRM can be done right. Steam shows that DRM doesn't have to ALWAYS be a bad thing. When DRM is done in a way that gives users options instead of infringing on their fair use rights and treating them like criminals, it can be a good thing.

And ironically, Steam is more effective at combating piracy than SecuROM ever could hope to be.
 

mope54

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It's not rocket science, search on posts regarding steam circa 2004.
They will sound exactly opposite of what you're writing.

@Godmachine
It's simply not true that stock holders are concerned with anything that dips into profit margins.
If that were the case, no product would ever be released as a small, vocal interest group exists for every thing manufactured. Business plans account for those who won't buy as well as those who buy. If you think that products are pushed to market based on variables like chance profits, especially with multi-billion dollar products, I don't know what will convince you. Oh wait, I do, read the law reviews that detail faulty products pushed to market which will give you some clue as to how tightly controlled sales are projected.
 

pxc

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Steam shows how DRM can be done right. Steam shows that DRM doesn't have to ALWAYS be a bad thing.
DRM/copy protection only works in very limited cases, which right now is online play. Since the user in most cases has to be connected to the internet anyways, validating a key is pretty transparent. Single player games are always hacked, including Steam games. There are a few companies that get it and don't hassle or treat their customers like criminals. Sadly most do not get it.

The PC gaming trend is becoming more Steam-like in one way mostly thanks to EA, and not a good one: attempting to prevent the resale of games. That puts certain retail boxed PC games (cough, especially Valve) in a very unique category unlike any other type of physical goods. With no way of revoking the registration and with explicit terms prohibiting the resale of games, Steam is miles from any measure of perfect.
 

Slachtbeest

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In the case of Crysis and Spore, the DRM was already implemented, so by the time the forceful outcries had really begun, there was nothing that could done about it. Though the should have learned from previous experience, as there's always been rebellion against install limits and SecuROM.

However, EA raising the install limits or slightly altering the installation process, isn't EA "throwing us a bone", since they should not have taken this route in the first place.

Again, these companies expect us to feel as if we're "getting something" from them or that they're "doing something right", because they're raising the install limit? It should have no limitations in the first place, so how is dealing with a problem half-assed, that they could and should have avoided in the first place, "giving" us anything? It's just a bullshit ploy to make it appear as if they're respecting their customers.

Especially since, at this point, the DRM is already there, so if anything does happen in the future regarding activation servers, patches etc., we're already taking the shit-end of the stick. For Spore and Warhead, its' already too late, if that ever happens to be the case.

As said above by someone else, some "headway" has been made, though this problem should not have existed in the first place, and if we have to continue to do this with every damn game that's released, it will eventually become a futile effort.

But, there's a chance in the near future so see whether or not EA is really listening...

EA is also the publisher for another big upcoming title, Dead Space, which is in the final stages of development. There is still time for them to make the decision to not install this DRM and shove consumer rights up our collective asses. So, lets see just how much they've really listened, because Dead Space looks to be a very big title and isn't quite finished yet. If they lay-off with the bullshit regarding install limits/activations etc.on the final product in coming weeks, then perhaps that will give us an idea. If not, then perhaps it really is just a snowball's chance in hell that they'll ever lay-off with this SecuROM/installation limitation bullshit, and continue to disregard consumer rights.

Only time will tell.
 
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Past the issue of DRM, is there going to be a game included that's actually worth playing this time?

After Crysis, I am definitely on the try before I buy track.
 

jimmyb

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It's not rocket science, search on posts regarding steam circa 2004.
They will sound exactly opposite of what you're writing.
And a lot of those criticisms are still quite valid. I think many people have just gotten "used" to steam and/or value the convenience of it more than the DRM aspects of it.

I won't buy anything that does not out-of-the-box give me the right to play the game 10-15 years down the road. I fairly regularly play games released in the early 90s.
 
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I won't buy anything that does not out-of-the-box give me the right to play the game 10-15 years down the road. I fairly regularly play games released in the early 90s.

Oddly that's pretty much the way I look at it.
I do however have a firm belief in the longevity of Steam though, so I believe my purchases made through it will be accessible for years and years to come. I think I was sort of won over when I could register my old Half-Life+expansion keys at no additional cost. That move made me feel like Valve intended to stay in the market for the long haul. Of course I could be wrong and all my purchases could be deactivated at some point in the future, but I believe that Valve actually cares about the gamers and would somehow back up our purchases if steam was failing.

Hell, I paid $14 for the X-Com series on Steam a little while back, just for the convenience of being able to have it everywhere. Hopefully they'll roll out the saved game cloud soon so I can access one campaign from school, work, or home.
 

Slachtbeest

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And a lot of those criticisms are still quite valid. I think many people have just gotten "used" to steam and/or value the convenience of it more than the DRM aspects of it.

I won't buy anything that does not out-of-the-box give me the right to play the game 10-15 years down the road. I fairly regularly play games released in the early 90s.

Early 90's, eh? Well, that's exactly one of my biggest points/issues.

I'd like to go back and play HL2, I'm sure, even ten years from now. Though I'm sure that if Steam does exist by then/at some point, that Valve will actually handle the situation appropriately. In a situation like with EA, I doubt they'll handle it appropriately, if at all, and that's the problem.

You should be able to go back and play a game from a decade past if you so desire, as you own it, so these publishers, particularly EA, need to get on the ball in considering things such as the consumer's rights and happiness, over trying to squeeze blood out of a stone and bringing in every god damn dime they can via "killing second-hand sales".

Longevity, "ease/non-limitation of use" and consumer rights should come first and foremost.
 

g1xx3r

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Finished off Crysis Warhead this morning.The ending was a little weak.Overall a pretty good game.Crytek addressed most of Crysis's shortcomings.A lot more action oriented and the alien AI is greatly improved..Glad I chose to spend time enjoying the game instead of bitching about what may happen 5 years from now..Sold it on ebay yesterday,shipped it this morning..DRM was a non factor in my enjpyment of this game.And of course,thats what games are for..right.. :rolleyes:
 

CHAoS_NiNJA

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Honestly, DRM is one of the main reasons I almost only use Steam to buy my games. I can download it to where ever I log in, I can do that as many times as I want, and as long as I have the account, I have all my games...hell, even if I somehow lose my account, a little bit of hassle with Valve will solve it.

Not to say I don't buy games from the store now and then, but the vast majority of my buys come through Steam...and when I do buy a physical copy, you can bet your ass it won't be anything with DRM, no matter how good the game is. I don't support companies that treat the customer like a criminal.
 

finalgt

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I don't have anything to add that hasn't been said already, except for:

I freaking hate "pirates." 15-year-olds with not enough money from mom to buy all the games they want to. Selfish wankers.
 

jonneymendoza

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DRM is definetly not fun. I'll give some examples of where Intrusive DRM hurts the consumer while the Pirate gets an easier experience:

1. Computers move on, but the intrusive DRM does not. The DRM is no longer compatible with your new operating system even though the game itself would physically run if the DRM didn't stop it.

2. The company forces your game to validate online, but you don't have an Internet connection or the validation servers are deactivated because the Games producer is losing money by keeping them active 5-10 years after the game is initially released. Also the Company may go bust and is unable to run the servers any more.

3. Some DRM is so intrusive that it begins to interfere with the stability of your PC, or stops other programs from functioning such as NERO or other Optical Disc devices.

4. The DRM may require you to use the CD/DVD that came with the game meaning each time you play your disc is being worn out going in and out of its case which has usually hard grips that can damage the center of the disc. Not to mention the hassle of having to keep digging the games packaging out.

5. DRM Bugs can simply cause your game to stop running. False positives, and general bad coding by the DRM's creator causes bugs that may make the game completely inaccessible to paying customers.

6. Re-installation issues if you don't call up the Games publisher and deactivate your old Installation. What if they stop maintaining those Phone systems, go bust or believe your a Pirate?

And finally, Number 7, DRM doesn't work. With each new DRM it only causes the Customers issues, costs the game company money in developing/purchasing/licensing the DRM and the pirates still get a DRM free version to download and use as they wish. The DRM is there to stop people from pirating the game but it doesnt do that. These Release groups that Rip and Crack games are not Joe-Average they are very competent programmers and hackers.

DRM to a Games Publisher is an easy way to rest their minds about the piracy level of their games. But it doesn't work. So what does work? - My advice to games publishers is this:

In each game, include a Serial Code. And then include a Multiplayer online aspect to your game. If people want to play that online component they have to login through your servers and have their Serial authorized by your authentication servers otherwise they won't be able to join any online games that are in progress.

Give the Pirates the Single-Player for free, but make them pay to play online. So many people want to play online and the pirated copies of good games with strong online components simply cannot compete with a retailed purchased version. I'm sure most people here are aware of 'Counter Strike: Source' its an Online FPS game with Team based action. It has been pirated so that people can play it online. However Due to the nature of the way the Developer kept updating the games online component with new features and improved authentication schemes the Pirated versions became unusable.

The game started off with the first pirate copy. Then within a year the group that originally put that copy on the Internet had to release over 29 separate updates so that pirates who downloaded their copy could keep playing the game. That sort of aggravation is what breaks the pirates resolve and makes them pay out. DRM does the opposite, it creates frustration for people who ARE paying for the game and makes THEM pirate. Don't make it easy for the Pirates, make it easy for your Customers.

That's all I have to say. Rant over.
 

Raudulfr

2[H]4U
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Messages
2,733
DRM is definetly not fun. I'll give some examples of where Intrusive DRM hurts the consumer while the Pirate gets an easier experience:

1. Computers move on, but the intrusive DRM does not. The DRM is no longer compatible with your new operating system even though the game itself would physically run if the DRM didn't stop it.

2. The company forces your game to validate online, but you don't have an Internet connection or the validation servers are deactivated because the Games producer is losing money by keeping them active 5-10 years after the game is initially released. Also the Company may go bust and is unable to run the servers any more.

3. Some DRM is so intrusive that it begins to interfere with the stability of your PC, or stops other programs from functioning such as NERO or other Optical Disc devices.

4. The DRM may require you to use the CD/DVD that came with the game meaning each time you play your disc is being worn out going in and out of its case which has usually hard grips that can damage the center of the disc. Not to mention the hassle of having to keep digging the games packaging out.

5. DRM Bugs can simply cause your game to stop running. False positives, and general bad coding by the DRM's creator causes bugs that may make the game completely inaccessible to paying customers.

6. Re-installation issues if you don't call up the Games publisher and deactivate your old Installation. What if they stop maintaining those Phone systems, go bust or believe your a Pirate?

And finally, Number 7, DRM doesn't work. With each new DRM it only causes the Customers issues, costs the game company money in developing/purchasing/licensing the DRM and the pirates still get a DRM free version to download and use as they wish. The DRM is there to stop people from pirating the game but it doesnt do that. These Release groups that Rip and Crack games are not Joe-Average they are very competent programmers and hackers.

DRM to a Games Publisher is an easy way to rest their minds about the piracy level of their games. But it doesn't work. So what does work? - My advice to games publishers is this:

In each game, include a Serial Code. And then include a Multiplayer online aspect to your game. If people want to play that online component they have to login through your servers and have their Serial authorized by your authentication servers otherwise they won't be able to join any online games that are in progress.

Give the Pirates the Single-Player for free, but make them pay to play online. So many people want to play online and the pirated copies of good games with strong online components simply cannot compete with a retailed purchased version. I'm sure most people here are aware of 'Counter Strike: Source' its an Online FPS game with Team based action. It has been pirated so that people can play it online. However Due to the nature of the way the Developer kept updating the games online component with new features and improved authentication schemes the Pirated versions became unusable.

The game started off with the first pirate copy. Then within a year the group that originally put that copy on the Internet had to release over 29 separate updates so that pirates who downloaded their copy could keep playing the game. That sort of aggravation is what breaks the pirates resolve and makes them pay out. DRM does the opposite, it creates frustration for people who ARE paying for the game and makes THEM pirate. Don't make it easy for the Pirates, make it easy for your Customers.

That's all I have to say. Rant over.

/clap

You sir, deserve the über-cookie.
 

mope54

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Crysis Wars is on a separate disk and only uses CD keys for playing on-line.
There is no other DRM, there is no SecuROM on the Crysis Wars DVD.

But you think Warhead should be DRM-free?
The single player component should be free to play?

ROFL

How about this? They charge you $30 for the online MP portion and you just toss the SP campaign so you don't have to worry about installing SecuROM on your computer...
 

twoeyes

Limp Gawd
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I just went out and bought 80 copies of spore and warhead for the 79 people who have an issue with their DRM. It's cool guys argument settled.
 

Krenum

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Crysis and Spore do suffer the same fate, there both horrible, lack luster and way too over-hyped games. Cha Ching EA's got your money!:eek:
 

CrimsonKnight13

Lord Stabington of [H]ard|Fortress
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They suffered the same fate due to draconian DRM, not from the anger from people who seem them as lackluster. I won't touch Spore but Crysis Warhead is a very fun game to play.
 

phide

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But you think Warhead should be DRM-free? The single player component should be free to play?
Are you inferring here that "DRM-free" and "free to play" are analogous?

The single player component should be free of rental stipulations e.g. install limits, yeah, if that's what you're suggesting :)
 

eggrock

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Crysis and Spore do suffer the same fate, there both horrible, lack luster and way too over-hyped games. Cha Ching EA's got your money!:eek:

They don't have your money? How do you know they're terrible?
 
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