Cleaning the bloat from Windows 10

B00nie

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This thread is golden. Thanks alot! not only i disable this for maximum privacy but also because i mainly installed Win10 for DX12 upcoming games. So i want the OS to be very light on resources as possible. I dont need dozens of stinking MS bloatware to interfere with my gaming experience and hog my CPU and GPU for nothing. The less shtty worthless processes running in the background, the better. :)

I'm in the same boat with you.
 

OutlawXGP

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Is the service "Tile Data model server"? Have you tried the registry hack I provided for Windows Defender? The key for this service seems to be HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\tiledatamodelsvc, again setting Start to 4 (and a reboot).

Quick update, I indeed tried this but I strongly recommend against it as it prevents windows to boot to desktop, I finally managed to get on by Control - Alt - Delete -> Task manager but I found that the start menu and task bar is none functional, so I just reverted the changes and everything is fine. This service has something to do with the new explorer.exe start menu and seems to be mandatory from my experience.

However thanks for providing its registry address anyway, never hurts to know more.
 

Jaxel

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I dont recommend disabling Tile Data model server. Doing so makes your PC take 15 seconds longer to start up.
 

Autopia

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this is a funny thread. an hour to install windows 10, then 2 hours to remove all the bloat that comes with it. lol this makes windows 8.1 look great, microsoft actually went backwards with this one, from windows 7 to windows vista.
 

Coldblackice

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this is a funny thread. an hour to install windows 10, then 2 hours to remove all the bloat that comes with it. lol this makes windows 8.1 look great, microsoft actually went backwards with this one, from windows 7 to windows vista.

To be fair, every OS Microsoft has ever released has "required" a couple hours of tweaking and refining by power users. It's the very nature of being a power user.

And this isn't knocking Microsoft, either -- of course MS is going to default-fit their OS for the bleeding majority grandparent who won't know or care that Candy Crush is stealing their identity and draining their pension while they haplessly search for their trusty "Solitaire" in a fit of wheezing panic, nowhere to be found.
 
D

Deleted member 245375

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After tweaking Windows installs for decades (literally almost 3 of them now) I finally just gave up because I just don't give a shit anymore - it's freakin' fast enough if you leave it alone, and breaking it by altering so much (as people are doing with Windows 10) is just going to cause problems in the long run.

It's just not worth the long term hassles which most people won't notice just yet but as time passes and Windows 10 gets said updates in the future there's going to be nothing but trouble, I guarantee it. :)
 

braamer

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After tweaking Windows installs for decades (literally almost 3 of them now) I finally just gave up because I just don't give a shit anymore - it's freakin' fast enough if you leave it alone, and breaking it by altering so much (as people are doing with Windows 10) is just going to cause problems in the long run.

It's just not worth the long term hassles which most people won't notice just yet but as time passes and Windows 10 gets said updates in the future there's going to be nothing but trouble, I guarantee it. :)

This is where I am now. Not worth the hassle any more, when out of the box performance is as good as it is.
 

SuperSubZero

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this is a funny thread. an hour to install windows 10, then 2 hours to remove all the bloat that comes with it. lol this makes windows 8.1 look great, microsoft actually went backwards with this one, from windows 7 to windows vista.
Bloat is totally opinion. Microsoft throws in a lot of stuff, cuz different people will want different things, and there hasn't been a "checkbox for stuff to install" for Windows (or most OS's) in years.

For every app that someone finds useless, someone else may find it useful. There's stuff in Windows 10 I will probably never use, but I don't think it's all taking an amount of resources worthy of yanking it out of the system. I just take it off the Start menu if it's there and forget about it.
 

OutlawXGP

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Well to each his own but me personally and a lot of like minded people prefer to remove useless services, background running tasks, metro applications that I will never consider using. I prefer disabling System restore, Hibernation, Page file to save SSD space. I like to remove Windows features that I personally would never use and I prefer configuring the OS to my liking and to keep everything local rather then on cloud.

Ever since Windows 2000 Microsoft have not done much to improve the core system functionality such as things like the kernal or the registry. The only thing they do is repolish the windows explorer GUI and add more bloat services which are enabled by default, in fact this is the first time in a while they made big promises about Direct X 12 and the improvements it will bring to future games. For example one of the stupid changes in particular in windows 10 I notice is how they separated most of the configuration sub menus from the classic control panel and placed them inside a metro style menu, this is neither innovation or improvement in anyway just an illusion of change for the simple minded.

So yes I do prefer my OS as light and clean as possible and that's why I created this thread so like minded people can share ideas and tips about the changes we could make. If your not comfortable with making any changes and keeping everything as default than that's absolutely fine and its your choice.
 
Last edited:

B00nie

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Well to each his own but me personally and a lot of like minded people prefer to remove useless services, background running tasks, metro applications that I will never consider using. I prefer disabling System restore, Hibernation, Page file to save SSD space. I like to remove Windows features that I personally would never use and I prefer configuring the OS to my liking and to keep everything local rather then on cloud.

Ever since Windows 2000 Microsoft have not done much to improve the core system functionality such as things like the kernal or the registry. The only thing they do is repolish the windows explorer GUI and add more bloat services which are enabled by default, in fact this is the first time in a while they made big promises about Direct X 12 and the improvements it will bring to future games. For example one of the stupid changes in particular in windows 10 I notice is how they separated most of the configuration sub menus from the classic control panel and placed them inside a metro style menu, this is neither innovation or improvement in anyway just an illusion of change for the simple minded.

So yes I do prefer my OS as light and clean as possible and that's why I created this thread so like minded people can share ideas and tips about the changes we could make. If your not comfortable with making any changes and keeping everything as default than that's absolutely fine and its your choice.

DX12 is so far just that, promises. I hope we see some real world test results soon.
 

OutlawXGP

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DX12 is so far just that, promises. I hope we see some real world test results soon.

Microsoft has made some bold claims about how DX12 gives lower level hardware accessibility and the API has been optimized very well for a dramatic performance boost, but like you said their is nothing right now to prove any of this.
 

B00nie

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Microsoft has made some bold claims about how DX12 gives lower level hardware accessibility and the API has been optimized very well for a dramatic performance boost, but like you said their is nothing right now to prove any of this.

Yeah nothing would be cooler than they live up to their promises. But it's not the first time marketing and truth are not a match made in heaven.
 

OutlawXGP

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Just another quick update, I added a tested method of extracting your Windows 10 product key for those that like to do a fresh reinstall from your current windows 7/8/8.1 to Windows 10 upgrade at the bottom of my first post.
 
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But the Product Key extracted from an upgraded or even clean installed Windows 10 machine will be the same key(s) that everyone else has so, it's somewhat pointless to do it. And you can't use the key you extract to actually do an upgrade or a clean install which is the point: Windows 10 is now using the hardware hash of a given machine to handle activation, not a Product Key (at least not for the upgrade version even for a clean install).

You will get the VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T for Windows 10 Pro and YTMG3-N6DKC-DKB77-7M9GH-8HVX7 for Windows 10 Home.

If you're actually showing keys that are different from those, you'll be the first person to report such an occurrence.

I've said this a few dozen times so I'll say it again just for the record: if you do a proper upgrade installation of Windows 10 - which is required the first time - on a qualifying legit install of Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 you will not need to input the Product Key (which you won't have anyway) because it's using the already legit activation of that install to be the qualifying product. Once you do the upgrade that first time, you can then clean install Windows 10 on the same hardware anytime you want and as much as you want and you will not be required to input a Product Key (which again doesn't matter) because it uses the hardware hash created during the upgrade to verify the install and the machine and then give you the activation.
 

OutlawXGP

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But the Product Key extracted from an upgraded or even clean installed Windows 10 machine will be the same key(s) that everyone else has so, it's somewhat pointless to do it. And you can't use the key you extract to actually do an upgrade or a clean install which is the point: Windows 10 is now using the hardware hash of a given machine to handle activation, not a Product Key (at least not for the upgrade version even for a clean install).

You will get the VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T for Windows 10 Pro and YTMG3-N6DKC-DKB77-7M9GH-8HVX7 for Windows 10 Home.

If you're actually showing keys that are different from those, you'll be the first person to report such an occurrence.


Well this method was posted on reddit before I discover and tried it out, and the key that my windows 10 displays is not the same as my 8.1 that I originally upgraded over, but having said that I did read something online about what you mentioned so perhaps you’re correct, either way dose not harm to have the product key identifier linked.
 
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Well of course Windows 10 won't have the Product Key of the previous version of Windows, that's not how it works. Everyone has the same Windows 10 keys after the upgrade because it's not relevant anymore; the hardware hash is. Retail purchasers of Windows 10 Home or Pro and Windows 10 Enterprise for businesses will require Product Keys, but nobody participating in the upgrade program needs one nor do they actually exist - those two keys I just posted are well known and from the last Insider preview but they can't be used to activate Windows 10 Home or Pro anymore.

And also people need to realize that when they do the upgrade it basically kills the previous operating system license after 30 days as well - Windows 10 as an upgrade only has a 30 day window to downgrade to the previous OS. Once an install of Windows 10 (upgrade) has passed the 30 day mark, technically and legally you're not entitled to use the previous OS anymore because that license was upgraded to the Windows 10 one. A lot of people miss that and vastly more just don't give a shit but, that's how it's supposed to work from a legal and technical aspect.
 

svet-am

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Where is the link to the Eula about the 30 day thing. I missed that and I printed out and went over the Eula from end to end and did not catch that.

Also, what is the best/proper way to eradicate the new Notification Center?
 

OutlawXGP

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Well of course Windows 10 won't have the Product Key of the previous version of Windows, that's not how it works. Everyone has the same Windows 10 keys after the upgrade because it's not relevant anymore; the hardware hash is. Retail purchasers of Windows 10 Home or Pro and Windows 10 Enterprise for businesses will require Product Keys, but nobody participating in the upgrade program needs one nor do they actually exist - those two keys I just posted are well known and from the last Insider preview but they can't be used to activate Windows 10 Home or Pro anymore.

And also people need to realize that when they do the upgrade it basically kills the previous operating system license after 30 days as well - Windows 10 as an upgrade only has a 30 day window to downgrade to the previous OS. Once an install of Windows 10 (upgrade) has passed the 30 day mark, technically and legally you're not entitled to use the previous OS anymore because that license was upgraded to the Windows 10 one. A lot of people miss that and vastly more just don't give a shit but, that's how it's supposed to work from a legal and technical aspect.


Aha I see, I'm sorry to say that I was not aware that's how it works with the "upgrades". Thanks for your informative input.
 

OutlawXGP

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Where is the link to the Eula about the 30 day thing. I missed that and I printed out and went over the Eula from end to end and did not catch that.

Also, what is the best/proper way to eradicate the new Notification Center?

Sorry for the double posting, I'm trying to figure out the same about the notifications, it seems to be part of the Windows shell host experience and I have not found anyway to disable the notifications yet. And as for the 30 days thing, I have seen that it says in windows you have 30 days to revert back to windows 8.1.
 
D

Deleted member 245375

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Where is the link to the Eula about the 30 day thing. I missed that and I printed out and went over the Eula from end to end and did not catch that.

Also, what is the best/proper way to eradicate the new Notification Center?

From the Windows 10 FAQ:

Can I go back to my previous version of Windows if I don’t like Windows 10?

Yes, while we think you will love all the features of Windows 10, you will have one month after upgrading to revert back to the previous version of Windows on your device.
 

OutlawXGP

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Yes Tiberian is correct I've seen the option to revert to Windows 8.1 with the one months limitation In Windows 10 after upgrading.
 
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Deleted member 245375

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Again more vagueness. One month is not 30 days.

Are you really going to use that as a debatable point? Seriously? While there's one month that has 28 days, every so often it has 29, but all the rest have 30 days, it's pretty easy to comprehend their meaning with the statement.
 

CaptNumbNutz

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Are you really going to use that as a debatable point? Seriously? While there's one month that has 28 days, every so often it has 29, but all the rest have 30 days, it's pretty easy to comprehend their meaning with the statement.

You forgot the months with 31 days. :p j/k

But your point stands. People are picking the fly shit out of the pepper arguing that. :cool:

But the Product Key extracted from an upgraded or even clean installed Windows 10 machine will be the same key(s) that everyone else has so, it's somewhat pointless to do it. And you can't use the key you extract to actually do an upgrade or a clean install which is the point: Windows 10 is now using the hardware hash of a given machine to handle activation, not a Product Key (at least not for the upgrade version even for a clean install).

You will get the VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T for Windows 10 Pro and YTMG3-N6DKC-DKB77-7M9GH-8HVX7 for Windows 10 Home.

If you're actually showing keys that are different from those, you'll be the first person to report such an occurrence.

I've said this a few dozen times so I'll say it again just for the record: if you do a proper upgrade installation of Windows 10 - which is required the first time - on a qualifying legit install of Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 you will not need to input the Product Key (which you won't have anyway) because it's using the already legit activation of that install to be the qualifying product. Once you do the upgrade that first time, you can then clean install Windows 10 on the same hardware anytime you want and as much as you want and you will not be required to input a Product Key (which again doesn't matter) because it uses the hardware hash created during the upgrade to verify the install and the machine and then give you the activation.
So what happens if say... 6 months down the road I completely upgrade my box...new cpu, new processor, new video card, new drive. I only want to use this copy of Win10 and won't be reusing 8.1.

Do I:
1. Have to start all over with Win8.1 and do an upgrade like the first go around?
2. Install Win10 from the media I created the a few months ago and it will activate fine?
3. Same as #2, but I have to call the MS activation phone number?
4. Buy new copy of Win10?
 
D

Deleted member 245375

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Going on what I know at this point in time, going on speaking with friends that currently work for Microsoft and querying them on just how such situations will be resolved when they start cropping up meaning people doing hardware upgrades or needing to reinstall on "new" hardware because of a hardware failure or whatever else might happen, what I've been told is that Microsoft will still follow the procedure they've had in place since XP brought about the introduction of product activation to begin with.

Now, having said that, the general concept is that because of a major hardware change a requirement to get a new activation is something that can't be avoided - we all seem to understand and agree that the biggest component that will immediately trigger a need to re-activate an installation of Windows is the motherboard itself but other components not so much. But here's what the Windows 10 FAQ says about the hardware change and I'm going to bold and italicize it so it's right there and can't be missed:

Can I reinstall Windows 10 on my computer after upgrading?

Yes. Once you’ve upgraded to Windows 10 using the free upgrade offer, you will be able to reinstall, including a clean install, on the same device. You won’t need a product key for re-activations on the same hardware. If you make a meaningful change to your hardware, you may need to contact customer support to help with activation. You’ll also be able to create your own installation media like a USB drive or DVD, and use that to upgrade your device or reinstall after you’ve upgraded.

Basically it says if you change your hardware (for whatever reason) you might need to call Microsoft to get their assistance with activating Windows 10 on the "new" hardware.

And that's where I'm gonna shut up because I could continue on - and believe me this isn't the first time people have asked this question - but that's it, right there in Microsoft's own words. If you want more info, call Microsoft. ;)
 

marka211

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You can also try this command in PowerShell if you ran the command to remove all the Modern apps including the Store.

Code:
Get-AppXPackage -AllUsers | Foreach {Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register "$($_.InstallLocation)\AppXManifest.xml"}

You may have to disable Cortana to get this command to install all the apps successfully.

Thanks
 

GreenMonkey

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After tweaking Windows installs for decades (literally almost 3 of them now) I finally just gave up because I just don't give a shit anymore - it's freakin' fast enough if you leave it alone, and breaking it by altering so much (as people are doing with Windows 10) is just going to cause problems in the long run.

It's just not worth the long term hassles which most people won't notice just yet but as time passes and Windows 10 gets said updates in the future there's going to be nothing but trouble, I guarantee it. :)

A couple of the tech sites reviewed and benchmarked the "Black Viper" Windows XP tweaks - disabling services and the like - back in the day.

Worked out that it did pretty much did nothing. If anything, it hurt performance.

Microsoft knows what they're doing. Those extra services are just being shuffled out in memory for stuff that matters, if needed.
 

svet-am

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A couple of the tech sites reviewed and benchmarked the "Black Viper" Windows XP tweaks - disabling services and the like - back in the day.

Worked out that it did pretty much did nothing. If anything, it hurt performance.

Microsoft knows what they're doing. Those extra services are just being shuffled out in memory for stuff that matters, if needed.

That is fair about performance; that isn't my concern. I am trying to kill the snooping and phoning home.
 
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That is fair about performance; that isn't my concern. I am trying to kill the snooping and phoning home.

Correct! This is no longer about performance, its about data collection, spyware, adware, your privacy! We want to disable as many of those things as we can!
 

D4rkn3ss

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lol it dudes around are angry bro!! calling it a data mining ransomware lol!
 

Ruoh

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Correct! This is no longer about performance, its about data collection, spyware, adware, your privacy! We want to disable as many of those things as we can!

Then do it at your firewall, properly, instead of hacking the OS to pieces, and causing unintended consequences.
 
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Then do it at your firewall, properly, instead of hacking the OS to pieces, and causing unintended consequences.

What exactly are the unintended consequences? Do you work for Microsoft? You sound upset that people figured out how to turn off and remove useless shit that we want to take no part of! I want to game and fap in peace! I dont need anyone spying on me or collecting data! Local account only and tweak my PC as per OP!
 

Ruoh

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What exactly are the unintended consequences? Do you work for Microsoft? You sound upset that people figured out how to turn off and remove useless shit that we want to take no part of! I want to game and fap in peace! I dont need anyone spying on me or collecting data! Local account only and tweak my PC as per OP!

*eyeroll* I'm more upset that morons continue to breed. If you want no part of it, go join B00nie on Linux.
 
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*eyeroll* I'm more upset that morons continue to breed. If you want no part of it, go join B00nie on Linux.

Right....... Lets leave every option on default, dont touch any settings or the PC may explode! How dare we customize the install? Dont touch that! Trust Microsoft because reasons and because good intentions.... Whos the moron now? :rolleyes:
 

tordogs

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The unintended consequences might not show up until later. We are seeing a paradigm shift in the way MS OS works now. It is a growing thing like a plant and each new part will be based on what was there before. I saw it while working with the preview versions. I'd turn off, un-install stuff and with the next upgrade it would all be back again. Now I just turn off stuff within the OS rather than going into the bowels and removing stuff from it. Each upgrade will look for or need what was there before to make changes so I see lots of broken upgrades ahead by messing in the innards.

The previous OS were basically cut and dried except for patches and security updates. W10 will be evolving for a while or until it ends, if it does. I recall people having trouble getting the SP1 for W7 because they had gutted stuff out of the original build then had to set about running fixit tools to get the service pack. I think W10 is going to be even worse. I detest the spying and data-gathering but don't want to damage the system so it can't continue to get the build releases as they occur--at least not at this early stage of the game.
 

D4rkn3ss

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Have you looked at the default privacy options? The EULA agreement? Congrats you win the most ignorant and idiotic post!

pfft lol the fuck is this shit? damage control? lol its not me who is telling brah, i personally dont give a fuck since since i can bend this or whatever to my will lol, check some of my previous posts before talking shit brah.
 
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