Check out this cheapo M.2 SSD, the DREVO D1 M.2 2280 240 GB $59

Burticus

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Hi guys, thought I'd share...

I'm parting together a Ryzen system on the cheap to upgrade my Plex server. I got a lightly used / pre-owned Ryzen 1700 for a good deal, some cheap (by current pricing standards) RAM and a cheap B350 motherboard. I already have an old SSD I was going to transplant, but it's an old Corsair Force 3 120gb, has to be several generations old... it's already on it's 3rd system, this would be the 4th. Time to go bigger/newer/faster. But needs to be cheap.

I think the Samsung 960 Evo 250gb NVME for $119 is probably the best choice in the price range, but I've already depleted my budget and thats just a little much for that system on a component I don't really "need". Also, NVME is probably a waste on a file/Plex server. Then I saw this thing on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/DREVO-240-Internal-Solid-State/dp/B076VLYL76

DREVO D1 M.2 2280 240 GB Internal SSD Solid State Drive SATA 6Gb/s Read 500MB/S Write 500MB/S

$59 shipped with Prime.

I've never heard of "Drevo". Only found 1 review online, from a site I'd never heard of, and it's in UK. HardwareSlave? hmmm. They liked it well enough.

https://www.hardwareslave.com/reviews/storage/drevo-d1-m-2-2280-240gb-internal-ssd-review/

So I know it's NOT an NVME drive, but for the price, I figured it couldn't be worse than the $49 Inland (store brand from Microcenter) 240gb SSD I was also looking at. http://www.microcenter.com/product/485911/240_GB_NAND_SATA_30_60_GB-s_25_Internal_SSD

So I'll try it and if it's just worthless I'll return it to Amazon.

It's got to be a rebrand, right? Wonder how I can figure out who makes it.

So other than Crystal, are there any other tests/benchmarks I should run on it, once I get it?

edit - link to homepage. 3 year warranty, I guess that's a plus. :)
https://www.drevo.net/product/storage/d1-ssd#product-spec
 
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Burticus

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Got it today.... my intended new motherboard isn't here yet, but I thought I'd throw it into my Z170 board and see what happens. First thing I noticed... no boot. It took the place of SATA 1, which was my Sumsung SSD. After moving some SATA cables around, I got it to come up and ran some benchmarks.

To be fair, the Samsung 850 Evo is 2-3 years old by now, and is currenty about half full. The Drevo is brand new and empty. That said, those numbers look really damn good for a bargain brand M.2 SSD. The temp is higher, but the M.2 doesn't have any kind of heatspreader on it. In fact it just has a big sticker covering the surface that says "warranty voided if removed" so that's a bummer.

crystal disk bench samsung 850 evo.JPG
crystal disk bench drevo m.2.JPG
 

jmilcher

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I thought about biting on the same drive. I wonder who the OEM is
 

Zamboni

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Yeah me too, but I don't want to peel off the warranty sticker on a brand new part just to get a peek at the chips.

It's a Silicon Motion controller, but the memory chips are labeled Drevo (marked SDXNS1CRG-064GFR W15128WFR Korea).
 

craigdt

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Cool thanks for the info. This would be great for a budget machine.

These are great for reducing cables too.
 

WhoMe

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Yeah me too, but I don't want to peel off the warranty sticker on a brand new part just to get a peek at the chips.
If you're in the USA they are violating law to deny warranty repair based on sticker removal. The FTC said the same thing--there was a story here about it. Of course if they were really nasty you'd have to take them to small claims court (I'd just complain to BBB and see what happened). Anyway technically that sticker means nothing.
 

PliotronX

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JFYI Drevo used to be named Hectron and they did seem like a good deal but there is only one functioning out of three that I purchased (one went in a friends laptop, and the other in another friends desktop). The working one has developed 73 reallocated sectors and Drevo refused to replace any of them because I didn't buy them from "authorized sellers." They mightve improved QC lately but I hope your drive does not fail as the warranty will likely be worthless..
 

Burticus

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JFYI Drevo used to be named Hectron and they did seem like a good deal but there is only one functioning out of three that I purchased (one went in a friends laptop, and the other in another friends desktop). The working one has developed 73 reallocated sectors and Drevo refused to replace any of them because I didn't buy them from "authorized sellers." They mightve improved QC lately but I hope your drive does not fail as the warranty will likely be worthless..

Thanks for the heads up. Got this one from Amazon (and as I now look at my order, fulfilled by Koolstuff store... I wish Amazon didn't pull this kind of crap, sigh. I better not have any problems!)
 

SuperSubZero

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If you're in the USA they are violating law to deny warranty repair based on sticker removal. The FTC said the same thing--there was a story here about it. Of course if they were really nasty you'd have to take them to small claims court (I'd just complain to BBB and see what happened). Anyway technically that sticker means nothing.
Everyone is quick to jump on this. I think the FTC ruling is related to those stickers when they put them in places where they would break if the device was disassembled. These are "don't go trying to replace parts in this!" stickers, and they are the FTC's target.

The warranty sticker on an m.2 module? Well, it's much less likely someone's gonna take a soldering iron to their m.2 module in some attempt to self-repair one. For these, the sticker has all of the information the warranty needs to be valid, like the model#, serial#, maybe the date of manufacture, etc. Removing that removes any information the manufacturer can use to verify warranty coverage. That said, yes, putting it on top of the RAM chips is lame. I already had one m.2 overheat and fail, and luckily I got it replaced under warranty. It would be nice if I could put some sinks on the new one. -.-;
 

WhoMe

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Everyone is quick to jump on this. I think the FTC ruling is related to those stickers when they put them in places where they would break if the device was disassembled. These are "don't go trying to replace parts in this!" stickers, and they are the FTC's target.

The warranty sticker on an m.2 module? Well, it's much less likely someone's gonna take a soldering iron to their m.2 module in some attempt to self-repair one. For these, the sticker has all of the information the warranty needs to be valid, like the model#, serial#, maybe the date of manufacture, etc. Removing that removes any information the manufacturer can use to verify warranty coverage. That said, yes, putting it on top of the RAM chips is lame. I already had one m.2 overheat and fail, and luckily I got it replaced under warranty. It would be nice if I could put some sinks on the new one. -.-;
There were some court cases on this some time ago. Sorry don't have the links anymore, but the upshot was such stickers don't mean anything you can remove the sticker if you want (but again if they want to be dicks about it you might have to take 'em to small claims which is a hassle of course they probably know the law though). The FTC is latest affirmation. Consumer law is pretty strong but can be a pain to convince business of this, I've done it a time or two but my crusading days are over. Your receipt is all the proof of warranty coverage you need (but a manufacture date can be useful if the receipt is lost).

I'm seriously considering an m.2 drive, though I hate the location of the slot on my MB, it's like they chose a spot designed to be a heat trap. Looks like the Samsun 970 will do better under heat...but there are limits. Oh well what's another fan in the case?

Edit. As always IANAL (just brought into the world by lawyers)
 
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SuperSubZero

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There were some court cases on this some time ago. Sorry don't have the links anymore, but the upshot was such stickers don't mean anything you can remove the sticker if you want (but again if they want to be dicks about it you might have to take 'em to small claims which is a hassle of course they probably know the law though). The FTC is latest affirmation.
The link you posted, your link, the one you URL'd, specifically called out particular industries; "automobiles, cellular devices, and video gaming systems." For these, it's clearly understood what the labels are, and what they are for, and why they are bad. If you open your xBox and replace the hard drive, you should not void the warranty. If you have the battery in your iPhone replaced by a third-party, it should not void the warranty.

For an m.2 module, if you remove the sticker, you are very directly removing the SERIAL NUMBER, the PART NUMBER, and ANY identifying information that either you or the manufacturer can use to determine if the warranty is even still applicable, or that the part is what you're claiming it is. You can't just take a random piece of silicon with some chips on it, send it to Samsung, and be like "well it's a 400TB m.2 module I just took the sticker off cuz FREEDOM now send me a new one." It doesn't work that way.

If you scrape the serial number off your xBox (and leave the 'warranty void if removed' label on the chassis intact) that's not covered under the link you linked, and would also likely impact the warranty. Manufacturers put serial numbers on products for good reasons.
 

WhoMe

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The link you posted, your link, the one you URL'd, specifically called out particular industries; "automobiles, cellular devices, and video gaming systems." For these, it's clearly understood what the labels are, and what they are for, and why they are bad. If you open your xBox and replace the hard drive, you should not void the warranty. If you have the battery in your iPhone replaced by a third-party, it should not void the warranty.

For an m.2 module, if you remove the sticker, you are very directly removing the SERIAL NUMBER, the PART NUMBER, and ANY identifying information that either you or the manufacturer can use to determine if the warranty is even still applicable, or that the part is what you're claiming it is. You can't just take a random piece of silicon with some chips on it, send it to Samsung, and be like "well it's a 400TB m.2 module I just took the sticker off cuz FREEDOM now send me a new one." It doesn't work that way.

If you scrape the serial number off your xBox (and leave the 'warranty void if removed' label on the chassis intact) that's not covered under the link you linked, and would also likely impact the warranty. Manufacturers put serial numbers on products for good reasons.
Oh yes by all means lets put the serial number on a sticker so we get around the law. LOL. Yep, I can see Apple etc. from now on not putting any serial number on their devices except on a sticker...that would be funny. But there are various methods that will (hopefully) let you remove the stickers intact if you're really worried...certainly enough to still read the info. Stickers can and do fall off on their own this whole argument is specious. If there is no reason to remove the sticker, will leave it there, but if it's impeding normal function of the device or repair (such as adding a heat sink because it's overheating) then they can put any info they want on it, doesn't absolve them from their legal obligations.

There is a long history to this, the FTC thing was simply the latest and interesting because they've pretty well ignored electronics manufactures mostly going after car makers using the Magnason-Moss Warranty Act. But again the main problem is the only recourse for an individual consumer is the court system which isn't worth it for most people. Class-action suits or FTC fines are really the only way this issue will be resolved. But I've seen companies respond to the BBB because they don't like the bad PR they get (good example was the Samsung SSD senility bug...they kept ignoring most people who complained because they were working on the issue but those who filed BBB complaints got their money back).
 

SuperSubZero

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Oh yes by all means lets put the serial number on a sticker so we get around the law. LOL.
I'm not sure where or how you would suggest they standardize putting this information on an m.2 module, where the top is typically packed with chips. I have two modules here, one has a fairly flat back, the other is all the contacts of the RAM chips. If you have some extremely cheap, standard way to serialize m.2 modules which you would enforce with regulation, by all means contact the m.2 makers (mine are both Toshibas) and get them on that. If your enforcement makes the modules cost more to make, well, I'll refer people to you.

The sad irony with all of this is neither sticker even mentions voiding any warranty if the sticker is removed. Of course trying to claim a warranty when the serial#, part#, etc., are gone, well, good luck I guess?
 

WhoMe

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I'm not sure where or how you would suggest they standardize putting this information on an m.2 module, where the top is typically packed with chips. I have two modules here, one has a fairly flat back, the other is all the contacts of the RAM chips. If you have some extremely cheap, standard way to serialize m.2 modules which you would enforce with regulation, by all means contact the m.2 makers (mine are both Toshibas) and get them on that. If your enforcement makes the modules cost more to make, well, I'll refer people to you.

The sad irony with all of this is neither sticker even mentions voiding any warranty if the sticker is removed. Of course trying to claim a warranty when the serial#, part#, etc., are gone, well, good luck I guess?
Lot's of things come with warranties that don't have serial numbers. Again your receipt is your proof of purchase and the date. They can put them in lots of places in an RFID chip for example if they wanted to or etched into the board. But the only way this truly gets settled is in the courts, so until then I'm afraid (and I hate saying this) we'll have to agree to differ.
 
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