CCNA + UNIX/LINUX

s0ldier93

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 3, 2002
Messages
169
Hello all. I will be signing up for the first of the 4 CCNA classes soon. I recently found out about the four UNIX/LINUX admin classes being held in sync with the CCNA ones. Would I be nuts for doing them simultaneously? That is CCNA-1 and UNIX/LINUX-1; then CCNA-2 and UNIX/LINUX-2; etc. . . .

Thoughts?
 

s0ldier93

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 3, 2002
Messages
169
Given an unrelated degree (aviation) and no other certs, do you think the entry level pay can replace my current days job (40K+?). Or does that thought make me nuts? . . . . . I flying CCNA????. . . . hhhmmmmm.......
 

Tim Wardlaw

Limp Gawd
Joined
May 13, 2002
Messages
360
well as I am in CCNA 4 right now,and taking a java course, i dont think that CCNA 1 and *nix course should be a problem for you.. Just make sure to set aside time to do all the labs
 

xphil3

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
1,212
i was on a full course load(4 other classes plus CCNA classes) and i didn't have a problem. Of those classes were 2 *nix classes(though I already had a lot of *nix experience by then).

As for certs helping you get 40K alone, i would say no, not without prior experience in the field. If you had a degree in IT/CS I would say thats entirely possible.Im not trying to dissuade you at all, i think that you should def do it :) . From what ive noticed though(im fairly new in the IT field) the average starting pay of out school with just a degree is in the low the mid 30 range with a few people in the 40's.

With that said, if you came from a school like RIT or Stevens, i know for a fact that you could get a job with just a degree in the 50's(companies like UBS, EMC, ect). and im rambling......
 

NWEng

n00bie
Joined
Nov 21, 2006
Messages
20
Just coming out of school with your CCNA, you may be lucky to get a network admin job. More than likely it will be a junior position that will mostly be cabling, racking, and simple routine maintenance with little exposure to working on a production network. After that it's baby steps and proving your worth. Experience still counts in this industry; having a CCIE means little if you can't explain something like the most common failures for establishing either phase 1 or 2 connections of a VPN. We do see through that kind of thing during the interview. However, I would expect a Jr. level position to pay somewhere around $35k to start depending on the market and other factors.
 

xphil3

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
1,212
having a CCIE means little if you can't explain something like the most common failures for establishing either phase 1 or 2 connections of a VPN..

[rant]
Ok, this is complete BS...:rolleyes: . Anyone with a CCIE will be able to answer that kind of a question without even using .00001% of their brain.

The CCIE is NOT an overrated certification, and one that has "JUST" a CCIE can make 100K+ with 0, YES ZERO experience. I have seen this time and time again... I personally know someone who went for his CCIE straight out of HS, got it, and made 120K at his first job.

Why?

Becuase when you're a CCIE, you work with real world scenarios, with real world enterprise level equipment. There is no such thing as a paper CCIE, though some people have said on this forum that this is becoming a fact..:rolleyes:
[/rant]
 

DiceMann

n00b
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
46
[rant]
Ok, this is complete BS...:rolleyes: . Anyone with a CCIE will be able to answer that kind of a question without even using .00001% of their brain.

The CCIE is NOT an overrated certification, and one that has "JUST" a CCIE can make 100K+ with 0, YES ZERO experience. I have seen this time and time again... I personally know someone who went for his CCIE straight out of HS, got it, and made 120K at his first job.

Why?

Becuase when you're a CCIE, you work with real world scenarios, with real world enterprise level equipment. There is no such thing as a paper CCIE, though some people have said on this forum that this is becoming a fact..:rolleyes:
[/rant]

You know jack shit. You are lying straight out of your ass and I can tell. Buddy, do you know how much it costs to achieve that level of certification. I have known people who have bought $10k worth of equipment, $5k worth of classes, and have failed the test three times. You do not have an "out of high school friend" who passed that exam. He is required to have two steps in the certification process from Cisco before he is officially allowed to take that exam. That takes around one year to achieve the CCNA/CCDA, one and a half to two years toget your CCNP, and it takes three years out in the field, a few years of study courses, and other means just to become SOLID in the foundations required for the CCIE.

On a truthful note:
I had a CCNA/Computer Science teacher at my high school who had a friend who worked as a network admin for a very long time. He had been a teacher for a long time with a CCNP and worked in the field when school was out. Over ten years, he built up a great amount of experience with Cisco equipment. After all those years of actual field experience, he thought it would be fun to pay the $1,200 for the Lab test and took his CCIE exam without having any of the proper coursework to be ready for the test. Amazingly, he passed with flying colors! He was later called by Cisco with a job offer. He was offered a six figured salary... and with that same week, he had quit his job as a community college teacher and left to work under Cisco.

So dude... You have to have experience.
 

DiceMann

n00b
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
46
If you are looking for a networking career and want to make around $50-60k a year at a very young age with little experience, here is how you do it:

Get a Masters degree in Computer Science or Mathematics.
Get up to your CCNP level certifications.
Then get all the other possible certifications you can receive such as:
3com, MSCE, UNIX, etc...
 

xphil3

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
1,212
You know jack shit. You are lying straight out of your ass and I can tell.
Buddy, do you know how much it costs to achieve that level of certification. I have known people who have bought $10k worth of equipment, $5k worth of classes, and have failed the test three times. You do not have an "out of high school friend" who passed that exam. He is required to have two steps in the certification process from Cisco before he is officially allowed to take that exam.

THis is where i tear you a new asshole bro. First off... you need NO OTHER CERTIFICATIONS TO TAKE THE CCIE....
http://www.ciscopress.com/markets/detail.asp?st=44718&rl=1

second paragraph asshat.

Second of all, My BOSS... never went to college... started studying right out of HS for the CCIE because his wife got pregnant(yea, at 18)...It took him a year and a half to study and pass. He was working at the same time as a printing apprentice, he quit after he passed and started working for McDonalds Corporate engineering their Wifi deployment(yes, that long ago) making ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS A YEAR... can i make it any more clear...

and yes I know exactly how much it costs to acquire that level of certification, more than the 10K you are speaking of actually... I'm starting to study for the IE in 2 weeks. I know its going to take me well over a year to be ready for the lab, but it will be worth it.

Now, STFU. kthxbai
 

DiceMann

n00b
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
46
THis is where i tear you a new asshole bro. First off... you need NO OTHER CERTIFICATIONS TO TAKE THE CCIE....
http://www.ciscopress.com/markets/detail.asp?st=44718&rl=1

second paragraph asshat.

Second of all, My BOSS... never went to college... started studying right out of HS for the CCIE because his wife got pregnant(yea, at 18)...It took him a year and a half to study and pass. He was working at the same time as a printing apprentice, he quit after he passed and started working for McDonalds Corporate engineering their Wifi deployment(yes, that long ago) making ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS A YEAR... can i make it any more clear...

and yes I know exactly how much it costs to acquire that level of certification, more than the 10K you are speaking of actually... I'm starting to study for the IE in 2 weeks. I know its going to take me well over a year to be ready for the lab, but it will be worth it.

Now, STFU. kthxbai

at least three years of practical experience implementing, deploying, operating, and troubleshooting complex Cisco networks is recommended.

So your high school buddy started working at age 15?

And yes, you are right. The CCIE doesn't have any requirements for the test. I am thinking of the CCNA/CCNP. You are directly required to have a CCNA before you can recieve a CCNP. I will admit that you are right, but I was thinking about the CCNP's rules on accident. However, that doesn't exonerate your lie! The world's youngest CCIE is 17 and he is from Romania. Anyone else his age that passes the test is actually recognized in Cisco's newsletters and such. They are joining only around ten thousand people around the world who hold the honor of being a CCIE. It is just damn-near impossible to believe you when you say that.
 

xphil3

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
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Messages
1,212
So your high school buddy started working at age 15?

And yes, you are right. The CCIE doesn't have any requirements for the test. I am thinking of the CCNA/CCNP. You are directly required to have a CCNA before you can recieve a CCNP. I will admit that you are right, but I was thinking about the CCNP's rules on accident. However, that doesn't exonerate your lie!

Ok, You need to read my posts before you jump on my back. I will quote myself

Second of all, My BOSS... never went to college... started studying right out of HS for the CCIE because his wife got pregnant(yea, at 18)...It took him a year and a half to study and pass.

I will explain it to you if you feel a bit slow.... He went to highschool, knocked his GF up.. had to get a job and could NOT go to college. RIGHT OUT OF HIGHSCHOOL he started to study for the CCIE. It took him a year and a half to prep himself for the Lab(only 3 months for the written). He was ~20 when he got his IE and immediately took a job at MD..

Can you comprehend? Would you like to know the prep course he used? He still has posts on CCIE prep forums from that far back..

Perhaps if you don't act like an asshat you might learn something....
 

DiceMann

n00b
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
46
Hello all. I will be signing up for the first of the 4 CCNA classes soon. I recently found out about the four UNIX/LINUX admin classes being held in sync with the CCNA ones. Would I be nuts for doing them simultaneously? That is CCNA-1 and UNIX/LINUX-1; then CCNA-2 and UNIX/LINUX-2; etc. . . .

Thoughts?

(back on topic)

Yes, it is very beneficial! You might want some Linux/Unix classes so that you can further your abilities as a system/database administrator as well. Linux and Unix are growing rapidly as usable corporate routers. That is what my father's company and two of his associates had me create for them, and they are working beautifully. I would recommend it for the experience since Linux and Unix are what most professionals will be using on 60% of the mission critical server stuff by 2008 (I heard that from Wired I believe).

It will also make you a better admin overall. It helps you develop your networking skills when you can effectively use it for building network services such as DNS, FTP, Apache, mySQL, etc.
 

DiceMann

n00b
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
46
Ok, You need to read my posts before you jump on my back. I will quote myself



I will explain it to you if you feel a bit slow.... He went to highschool, knocked his GF up.. had to get a job and could NOT go to college. RIGHT OUT OF HIGHSCHOOL he started to study for the CCIE. It took him a year and a half to prep himself for the Lab(only 3 months for the written). He was ~20 when he got his IE and immediately took a job at MD..

Can you comprehend? Would you like to know the prep course he used? He still has posts on CCIE prep forums from that far back..

Perhaps if you don't act like an asshat you might learn something....

Alright, I will believe this bigfish story wholeheartedly. But you get what I mean when I say bigfish story? It just sounds too far-fetched. Sorry if I come off as abrasive as sandpaper, but I have become accustomed slapping liars around. Sorry, I just get bugged by liars really easily sometimes. I remember I while back when this dumbass said he graduated from MIT with Summa Cum Laude on a Slashdot forum board. You know what is funny about that, MIT doesn't give honors upon graduation and doesn't publicly recognize it. I had all the right to slap him down for saying something like that.

So you get where I am coming from, right? Sometimes a story just seems too rare to be true. But I guess you fervently back it, so I will believe you.
 

DiceMann

n00b
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
46
(back on topic)

Yes, it is very beneficial! You might want some Linux/Unix classes so that you can further your abilities as a system/database administrator as well. Linux and Unix are growing rapidly as usable corporate routers. That is what my father's company and two of his associates had me create for them, and they are working beautifully. I would recommend it for the experience since Linux and Unix are what most professionals will be using on 60% of the mission critical server stuff by 2008 (I heard that from Wired I believe).

It will also make you a better admin overall. It helps you develop your networking skills when you can effectively use it for building network services such as DNS, FTP, Apache, mySQL, etc.

Actually, I just finished looking at the "Networking Gallery" and I saw your "datacenter."

:eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:
Jesus, that is a lot for your basement, but I guess you use it for training.

I only have a wall mounted rack with one old 3com switch and an embedded PC for my router I made using Gentoo and a few tower PCs dedicated to NAS and Torrent shares.
 

xphil3

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
1,212
Actually, I just finished looking at the "Networking Gallery" and I saw your "datacenter."

:eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:
Jesus, that is a lot for your basement, but I guess you use it for training.

I only have a wall mounted rack with one old 3com switch and an embedded PC for my router I made using Gentoo and a few tower PCs dedicated to NAS and Torrent shares.

You referring to my setup?

and its okay that you have doubts about him, its def a crazy story and hes my main motivation. I wouldn't be where I am today(cisco wise) without his guidance. Also, some of that stuff in my racks is stuff he sold me.. haha:p
 

DiceMann

n00b
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
46
You referring to my setup?

and its okay that you have doubts about him, its def a crazy story and hes my main motivation. I wouldn't be where I am today(cisco wise) without his guidance. Also, some of that stuff in my racks is stuff he sold me.. haha:p

Yeah, you will not believe this but I almost managed to afford my own suite of Cisco equipment on a five finger discount. My "friend," the school's cyberpunk, stole some switches and computer equipment from a storage room whenever the school did it's "five year IT cycle." He managed to score some nice switches, two routers, and some fiber testing junk. He made me an offer on all of it, but I refused to even look at it since I could be thrown in jail.

I know kids who are good enough to walk out with big ass Cisco routers from the Computer Science rooms and go threw the school without any notice. :rolleyes: I hate when they do it... When I go to class, my teacher loses her damn mind and starts yelling and bitching.
 

Tim Wardlaw

Limp Gawd
Joined
May 13, 2002
Messages
360
Glad you two could make nice... :p

Anyway, your best bet to make any good money right out of college is to get a coop or a student position with a company now. I have been working through college and started with another guy. He finished before me and he is now making between 40-50k cdn out of college with 2 1/2 years experience. Getting as many certs as you can is always good. Some companies wont look at you with out a cert, but some will weigh in more on your experience.. Cert + Experience + education = +++$

Myself since i will be finishing my ccna course this spring I will go for my CCNA cert some time in June. Also in June I will reach my requirement for experience to write my CISSP, I'll start studying for that this summer.

On that note anyone here have their CISSP? (Certified Information Systems Security Professional)
 

NWEng

n00bie
Joined
Nov 21, 2006
Messages
20
[rant]
Ok, this is complete BS...:rolleyes: . Anyone with a CCIE will be able to answer that kind of a question without even using .00001% of their brain.

The CCIE is NOT an overrated certification, and one that has "JUST" a CCIE can make 100K+ with 0, YES ZERO experience. I have seen this time and time again... I personally know someone who went for his CCIE straight out of HS, got it, and made 120K at his first job.

Why?

Becuase when you're a CCIE, you work with real world scenarios, with real world enterprise level equipment. There is no such thing as a paper CCIE, though some people have said on this forum that this is becoming a fact..:rolleyes:
[/rant]
You took my post way too far. It was just meant to be a simple analogy comparing a certification to experience, nothing more. Since I made no disparaging remarks regarding any certification, including CCIE, I suggest limiting your caffeine intake in the future as I'm really not sure what part of my post got you all worked up to that extent. And yes, I would expect any CCIE should be able to explain phase 1 and/or 2 failures.
 

xphil3

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
1,212
You took my post way too far. It was just meant to be a simple analogy comparing a certification to experience, nothing more. Since I made no disparaging remarks regarding any certification, including CCIE, I suggest limiting your caffeine intake in the future as I'm really not sure what part of my post got you all worked up to that extent. And yes, I would expect any CCIE should be able to explain phase 1 and/or 2 failures.

Perhaps a bad analogy, I guess that some people take the rolleye faces and the word BS a bit too seriously. All i was trying to convey was that anyone going for the CCIE certification is going to be forced to use the actual equipment and perform lab scenarios that are very advanced to say the least as well as prove this in a strenuous 8hr lab test.

Oh well, its over and done with... next time I guess we should both choose our words/analogy's a bit more carefully.:p

but one final word to the OP: Like i said earlier in the post, do it up man... If you have enough motivation(and time, heh) you can do anything and make as much money as you want. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise
 

Arch

Gawd
Joined
Mar 9, 2000
Messages
822
And yes, I would expect any CCIE should be able to explain phase 1 and/or 2 failures.

Note, CCIEs take the exam based on a certain technology track as I'm sure you know. Don't expect a Voice CCIE to be able to explain VPN connection failures to you. I know I can't.
 

s0ldier93

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 3, 2002
Messages
169
Wow. I missed allot between last night and now. I to have left out a detail or two it seems. I have already finished an aviation related degree from Embry-Riddle. I am basically stuck in an OK paying job (the 40K one) that won't get me anywhere I want to go. I'll stop talking about my job there to keep from ranting.

I am looking for a change of direction. I should have gone to college for IT or CS. So aside from proving that I can study and finish classes, my particular degree probably won't mean much at my first IT job. I was wondering if it (and a CCNA with a *nix cert or two) carried enough "maturity weight" to start me of in an entry position at the 40'something I'm making now. Maybe the private pilot's license could help. :D

Also, I plan on eBay'ing a 2500 or two for home study. . . . . am I looking for the right one?
 

xphil3

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
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Messages
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Wow. I missed allot between last night and now. I to have left out a detail or two it seems. I have already finished an aviation related degree from Embry-Riddle. I am basically stuck in an OK paying job (the 40K one) that won't get me anywhere I want to go. I'll stop talking about my job there to keep from ranting.

I am looking for a change of direction. I should have gone to college for IT or CS. So aside from proving that I can study and finish classes, my particular degree probably won't mean much at my first IT job. I was wondering if it (and a CCNA with a *nix cert or two) carried enough "maturity weight" to start me of in an entry position at the 40'something I'm making now. Maybe the private pilot's license could help. :D

Also, I plan on eBay'ing a 2500 or two for home study. . . . . am I looking for the right one?

The CCNA and a few *nix certs will probably not get you in the 40k range to start, after a year or two of experience it will. The CCNA will get your foot in the door(an interview), but they might want to see other credentials. Theres only one way to find out though:)

and yes, 2500's will work fine for CCNA labbing. You are going to want atleast 2 of them though. You will also need a 1900 or 2900 catalyst. I personally recommend 1700's or 2600's with atleast one fast ethernet interface so you can do dot1q trunking, you cannot do dot1q with the 2500 series line.
 

s0ldier93

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 3, 2002
Messages
169
UUmmm. . . .

2 x 2500's, 1 x X900. Is the 1700 or 2600 in addition to or replacing the 25 and/or X9. (big X = 1 or 2)

I can't wait until I know these things.
 

xphil3

[H]ard|Gawd
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UUmmm. . . .

2 x 2500's, 1 x X900. Is the 1700 or 2600 in addition to or replacing the 25 and/or X9. (big X = 1 or 2)

I can't wait until I know these things.

they can def replace the 2500's. BUT, I would get a 2509 with an octal cable;) trust me on this one. And the 1900's will def do, but remember they are only 10mbit. Get yourself 1 2924 or 2950 if you want something that you can use later as well, they are pretty cheap now anways
 

s0ldier93

Limp Gawd
Joined
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Messages
169
Roger that.

I have about 2 months to get whet I need. Classes start in March. . . . . . well, should I go with CCNA for Dummies or will my engineer friends TCP/IP text book for preliminary reading. I heard the Dummies book was a good pre-class read.
 

DiceMann

n00b
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
46
Roger that.

I have about 2 months to get whet I need. Classes start in March. . . . . . well, should I go with CCNA for Dummies or will my engineer friends TCP/IP text book for preliminary reading. I heard the Dummies book was a good pre-class read.

Get that and buy some simulators... I stole the files off of our student data server at school, do you want the simulators and course guides? :p

As for books:
http://www.oreilly.com/pub/topic/cisco

They are expensive sons of bitches, but they read very easily. I put a couple by my toilet and I finish one book every four months that way. ;)
 

Blitzrommel

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 26, 2001
Messages
2,659
they can def replace the 2500's. BUT, I would get a 2509 with an octal cable;) trust me on this one. And the 1900's will def do, but remember they are only 10mbit. Get yourself 1 2924 or 2950 if you want something that you can use later as well, they are pretty cheap now anways

I gotta disagree on the 1900's, even when I took the CCNA exam in October of 2005, they didn't care about CatOS whatsoever. Save yourself some trouble and get a 2900XL or best yet, a 2950 switch.
 

s0ldier93

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 3, 2002
Messages
169
Hello all. I have found http://www.ciscokits.com from reading posts here. I have seen that people have had good experience with them. (If anyone has not, please advise).

Being that I have until March to prepare, and would like a head start. I'd like to start with 1 router, than get the second in a few weeks, then a switch before the start of the class. (Following this suggestion: http://www.thebryantadvantage.com/HOME LAB Suggested Topologies.htm )
Should that first one be the 2503, 2509, or 2514? Whichever one I choose, it will only be alone for a few weeks. I am looking for the best standalone starter router. Maybe the best IOS or menu. If the consensus s the 2509, I'll have to ebay it, as it is not carried on Bob's website.
 

xphil3

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
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Messages
1,212
Hello all. I have found http://www.ciscokits.com from reading posts here. I have seen that people have had good experience with them. (If anyone has not, please advise).

Being that I have until March to prepare, and would like a head start. I'd like to start with 1 router, than get the second in a few weeks, then a switch before the start of the class. (Following this suggestion: http://www.thebryantadvantage.com/HOME LAB Suggested Topologies.htm )
Should that first one be the 2503, 2509, or 2514? Whichever one I choose, it will only be alone for a few weeks. I am looking for the best standalone starter router. Maybe the best IOS or menu. If the consensus s the 2509, I'll have to ebay it, as it is not carried on Bob's website.

soldier, its so funny that you said that.. i just emailed the guy today to see if he does instore pickup and he does... im also from NJ so I may be headed to his place tomorrow to pick up some goodies... ill let you know
 

Blitzrommel

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 26, 2001
Messages
2,659
Hello all. I have found http://www.ciscokits.com from reading posts here. I have seen that people have had good experience with them. (If anyone has not, please advise).

Being that I have until March to prepare, and would like a head start. I'd like to start with 1 router, than get the second in a few weeks, then a switch before the start of the class. (Following this suggestion: http://www.thebryantadvantage.com/HOME LAB Suggested Topologies.htm )
Should that first one be the 2503, 2509, or 2514? Whichever one I choose, it will only be alone for a few weeks. I am looking for the best standalone starter router. Maybe the best IOS or menu. If the consensus s the 2509, I'll have to ebay it, as it is not carried on Bob's website.
I'd go for a 2514. The 2509 is mostly good when you already have a few routers; since it's mostly an access server.
 

s0ldier93

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 3, 2002
Messages
169
Thanks for the info guys.

Is the 2514 one of the ones that will be useful with the CCNP as well?
 

Blitzrommel

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2,659

Yoblad

[H]ard|Gawd
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Would a pair of 1720's and a 2950 be enough to get me through the CCNP?
 

Gofaster

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Jul 9, 2004
Messages
31
Ok let me ask this question. I am going to school to get my CCNA then CCNP then CISSP. What books and equipment should I buy?
Does anyone have any links to sites that would explain this? I have searched the forum and keeping different answers to what equipment to get.
 

-(Xyphox)-

Supreme [H]ardness
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Messages
6,518
Ok let me ask this question. I am going to school to get my CCNA then CCNP then CISSP. What books and equipment should I buy?
Does anyone have any links to sites that would explain this? I have searched the forum and keeping different answers to what equipment to get.

It all really depends on how much you want to spend:p
The sky is the limit. You can get by on some of the older rotuers and switches, But Seeing your going that far in Cisco, i would look into getting some decent Routers and Switches. Books, you'll need the Cisco books which could come with the courses.
 
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