Can somebody tell me how to remove owncloud from Mint?

Deadjasper

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"I get unable to locate package owncloud" when I ""sudo apt-get remove --purge owncloud owncloud-client""

Thanks
 
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How did you install it and what makes you think it's still there? Maybe there's some reminent files you just need to delete.., otherwise what you did should work I would think.., guess you could try:

apt-get purge --auto-remove owncloud owncloud-client
 

Deadjasper

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The icon is still in the task bar and I can still open it so yea, it's still there. I tried your way and it still says "unable to locate package owncloud". Google is no help either.
 

CrimsonKnight13

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Have you verified, after removal, that it's not running? If so, kill the process(es) and/or restart Mint. You probably won't see it anymore.
 

Deadjasper

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Yep, it is.

Screenshot at 2018-04-10 19-18-16.png
 

Mazzspeed

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You da man !! It's gone !!

Awesome, glad to be of assistance. To outline the commands:

sudo apt-get purge owncloud* = sudo, which is like logging as admin for the purpose of running apt which is the package manager for Mint and purging anything beginning with owncloud with the use of '*' which is the wildcard.

sudo apt autoremove runs apt as admin (basically elevates privileges) to auto remove any dependencies not associated with an installed package.

You could possibly run sudo apt purge owncloud* in place of sudo apt-get purge owncloud* as apt has replaced apt-get. Try to familiarize yourself with the use of apt in the terminal as you'll be using it quite often and once you get the hang of it you'll wonder how you ever did without it under other operating systems!
 
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CrimsonKnight13

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Awesome, glad to be of assistance. To outline the commands:

sudo apt-get purge owncloud* = sudo, which is like logging as admin for the purpose of running apt which is the package manager for Mint and purging anything beginning with owncloud with the use of '*' which is the wildcard.

sudo apt autoremove runs apt as admin (basically elevates privileges) to auto remove any dependencies not associated with an installed package.

You could possibly run sudo apt purge owncloud* in place of sudo apt-get purge owncloud* as apt has replaced apt-get. Try to familiarize yourself with the use of apt in the terminal as you'll be using it quite often and once you get the hang of it you'll wonder how you ever did without it under other operating systems!

apt replaced apt-get? I always thought that apt-get was addressing apt from the get-go?
 

CrimsonKnight13

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Go for it! The best way to learn is to try to use something you're uncomfortable with as much as possible until the penny drops.

Then I can ask you for advice. ;)

I mostly deal with pacman & trizen (for AUR) on Manjaro & Arch, but I haven't forgotten too much for apt-get. Shouldn't be too hard to dig into apt, right? :ROFLMAO: I'll be sure to help out when I can here if I understand more of it.
 

CrimsonKnight13

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So... found out the equivalence for the most commonly used apt-get commands (with sudo of course)

apt-get update -> apt update

apt-get upgrade -> apt upgrade

apt-get dist-upgrade -> apt full-upgrade

apt-cache search <searchtext> -> apt search <searchtext>

apt-get install <packagename> -> apt install <packagename>


I will definitely say that apt is whole lot closer to normal terminal apps than apt-* multiple apps.
 

Mazzspeed

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So... found out the equivalence for the most commonly used apt-get commands (with sudo of course)

apt-get update -> apt update

apt-get upgrade -> apt upgrade

apt-get dist-upgrade -> apt full-upgrade

apt-cache search <searchtext> -> apt search <searchtext>

apt-get install <packagename> -> apt install <packagename>


I will definitely say that apt is whole lot closer to normal terminal apps than apt-* multiple apps.

I find the newer 'apt' far cleaner than the older 'apt-get', I rarely use apt-get anymore. Just remember, any time you want a list of installed packages use the command 'dpkg --list'.
 

CrimsonKnight13

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I find the newer 'apt' far cleaner than the older 'apt-get', I rarely use apt-get anymore. Just remember, any time you want a list of installed packages use the command 'dpkg --list'.

Why not just use "apt list --installed" instead? (edited due needing "--installed")

Screenshot 2018-04-11 19.51.51.png
 
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CrimsonKnight13

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2 more that may be helpful

apt-get purge <packagename>* -> apt purge <packagename>*
apt-get remove <packagename> -> apt remove <packagename>
 

Vermillion

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Ahh package managers. The civilized way to control how things get installed and updated on a computer. Gotta love'em.
 

Lunar

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So, one thing about apt though, is that while it is nicer to use by hand, if you are writing a script it is still recommended to use an apt- command because apt doesn't always behave correctly in a script. It even gives you a warning if you combine it with another command such as sudo apt purge owncloud* && sudo apt autoremove

I will definitely say that apt is whole lot closer to normal terminal apps than apt-* multiple apps.
Yes and no. From a UNIX philosophy standpoint it actually isn't. Kinda like systemd, apt serving multiple purposes the way it does goes against the UNIX philosophy of splitting things up into many smaller processes. Now, that being said I personally like apt more for the reasons listed by others, but it does have its caveats. I'm also not one of the systemd haters. I actually quite like systemd, and think the people who don't need to chill out a bit.
 

Mazzspeed

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So, one thing about apt though, is that while it is nicer to use by hand, if you are writing a script it is still recommended to use an apt- command because apt doesn't always behave correctly in a script. It even gives you a warning if you combine it with another command such as sudo apt purge owncloud* && sudo apt autoremove


Yes and no. From a UNIX philosophy standpoint it actually isn't. Kinda like systemd, apt serving multiple purposes the way it does goes against the UNIX philosophy of splitting things up into many smaller processes. Now, that being said I personally like apt more for the reasons listed by others, but it does have its caveats. I'm also not one of the systemd haters. I actually quite like systemd, and think the people who don't need to chill out a bit.

I never understood all the fuss over systemd, gotta love the neckbeards.
 
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ChadD

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Mazzspeed

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https://www.zdnet.com/article/linus-torvalds-and-others-on-linuxs-systemd/

I do hope that at some point it gets dumped but I doubt that will happen. lol

In its defense I don't think it has been the disaster some feared. Still it does try and do way more then most developers like. :) It hasn't made updates the massive pain the rear some feared for instance.

I've never had a problem with it and the only time I reboot when updating is for kernel updates, having said that I read that the latest version of Ubuntu is allowing for live patching meaning no reboots for kernel updates. I think earlier on there was some concern over systemd, but I think most of the concerns were fairly unwarranted.
 

ChadD

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I've never had a problem with it and the only time I reboot when updating is for kernel updates, having said that I read that the latest version of Ubuntu is allowing for live patching meaning no reboots for kernel updates. I think earlier on there was some concern over systemd, but I think most of the concerns were fairly unwarranted.

For the most part it does what its supposed to do... I don't really have any issues with it myself. I thought in general most distros jumped on a bit to quick. But I guess everyone using it was half the point, and I do think its pretty well taken care of these days. (its still only 8 years old or so) It is nice that Ubuntu/RHEL-Cent/SLES-SUSE share core init systems these days. Pretty much everything your going to find in server land operates very much the same these days at least on the major stuffs. The windows user common cry of "fragmentation I say" is mostly gone now on the core level of things.
 

Mazzspeed

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While we're talking about tricky Linux commands, anyone run Nvidia hardware with the Nvidia drivers? (not Nouveau - Hiss). Copy/paste the following command into terminal, bearing in mind that to copy/paste under Linux you only need to highlight text without clicking the mouse, go to the terminal window and press the center mouse button to paste:

watch -n 1 nvidia-smi

A very handy little command that highlights why the terminal is so versatile under Linux.
 
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