Burning DVD's so they can play in DVD players

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Recently I ripped a couple dvds of mine to my computer just so i would have them on my portable hard drive, well i just discovered yesterday that it seems someone jacked the actual DVD's out of my collection, so what I want to kno is, how do I go about Burning them on to a DVD so that they will work in a DVD player, i kno how to make them work like on other computers and like my Xbox360 and PS3 but not in a actual DVD player. Can I use Nero ? and if so, what settings do I use..and if not what other program should i use ?
 

bigdogchris

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You need a DVD authoring program. FinalBurner is free and will let you select movie files and it will properly encode and burn them to DVD for you.
 
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I cant seem to get FinalBurner to work, when I select the Video_TS files I want to burn, and then click on Burn, it says "Building ISO" then it sits there for a bit, then it says its done and thats it ejecting, but it doesn't eject, and so I let it sit there for a second, nothing happened, so I just ejected myself, and it didn't burn anything on to the DVD whatsoever. tried this a couple times with the same result each time. I used MagicDVD Ripper to rip the DVDs, if that makes any difference.
 

DeaconFrost

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You'll probably need a program to convert the files from whatever codec/container you used to DVD format, and then you can use any standard burning app to put it on the disc.
 
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You'll probably need a program to convert the files from whatever codec/container you used to DVD format, and then you can use any standard burning app to put it on the disc.

well when I ripped them using MagicDVD Ripper, it ripped them as Video_TS format. I'm not to familar with anything outside of AVI and MPEG, but i was under the impression that Video_TS is what you wanted them to be in if you want to burn them to DVD and allow them work on a normal DVD Player. is this assumption wrong ?
 

DeaconFrost

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That's the format they should be in. I thought you meant your source files were in avi, h264, mkv, etc. I thought you meant they were a single file going back to a format meant for DVD.

If you have them converted back to VIDEO_TS files, then try any burning app. If you have Nero, it should work.
 

phide

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There's more to DVD authoring than the contents of VIDEO_TS, though. That's why you need DVD Flick (or similar). ImgBurn can burn the VIDEO_TS folder, sure, but that alone isn't sufficient for playback in DVD players.

If FinalBurner doesn't work, try DVD Flick.
 

DeaconFrost

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ImgBurn can burn the VIDEO_TS folder, sure, but that alone isn't sufficient for playback in DVD players.
I haven't come across a burning app yet that can't take a VIDEO_TS folder and make it into a playable DVD.
 

biiscit

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When I did this, I simply selected 'DVD Video' or something like that in Nero and burned away. Nero sets up the file structure and also converts on the fly if necessary I believe.
 

Jon55

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More importantly, use DVD-R. Not DVD+R (and definitely not DVD-RW or DVD+RW). DVD-R has been around the longest and is more compatible with all DVD players. Pretty much all new DVD players can play DVD+R's, but just for compatibility's sake use DVD-R. Here's a better explanation taken from this site:

Reader Harry writes: My dvd drive in my computer says DVD+/-RW. Which blank disc do I buy: -R or +R or -/+R, for one-time recording? What brand do you prefer for movies?

Back in the old days (we're talking roughly 2002), there were two competing writeable DVD formats: DVD-R and DVD+R. Anyone who remembers the more recent battle between Blu-ray and HD DVD knows the story: A bunch of companies lined up on one side of the fence and a bunch lined up on the other. A battle of wills and pocketbooks ensued: Would DVD-R or DVD+R become the standard for writeable DVDs?

Unlike the high-definition DVD battle, this one had an unusual outcome, quite rare in the world of tech: Both standards became accepted.

It helps that DVD-R and DVD+R weren't terribly different in design from the start. Both can be read and written using the same kind of hardware without much extra work, unlike Blu-ray and HD DVD, so it was a rather simple matter to design an optical drive that could handle both formats. Ultimately, manufacturers of DVD drives decided to end-run the media companies' format war and simply include the firmware to support both types of discs. Case closed.

Today you'll be hard-pressed to find an optical drive that doesn't support both DVD-R and DVD+R, and they're noted as DVD+/-R (or more commonly DVD+/-RW) drives. (The plus is typically above the minus sign, but I can't render that accurately in this blog post.)

Discs, however, are one or the other. There's no such thing as a DVD+/-R disc, only DVD+R or DVD-R media.

So, which one is "better?" Tough question, and different sources make different claims about the merits of each. DVD+R has a few technical advantages, but they're extremely slight. DVD-R on the other hand seems to be slightly more compatible with standalone DVD players, so if you burn a movie onto a DVD, you're theoretically more likely to get a disc that works. That said, there are players that support DVD-R but not DVD+R, and vice versa. There's not a lot of rhyme or reason to it, but most modern players accept both. Check the manual of the hardware you own already, as that could drive your selection of what kind of disc to use. In the abstract, though, most users will notice zero difference between the two types of discs.

As for brands, any name brand is fine. I use Verbatim, Maxell, Memorex, and Sony discs regularly and have never encountered any problems aside from format incompatibility, which has nothing to do with the brand. I suggest you buy what's on sale.
 

TechieSooner

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That's fine, but you're neglecting the fact that some burners only support one or the other... So the choice might already be made.
 

Lateralus

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Reader Harry said:
As for brands, any name brand is fine. I use Verbatim, Maxell, Memorex, and Sony discs regularly and have never encountered any problems aside from format incompatibility, which has nothing to do with the brand. I suggest you buy what's on sale.

This part I do not agree with...I've always preferred quality media (Taiyo Yuden or some Verbatim) without going overboard (MAM-A). Some of the cheap Taiwanese junk may work now, but your data almost assuredly won't last as long as it would with quality made-in-Japan media. I don't need a 100 year archival life, but I don't want the disc to be unplayable after 6 months - 1 year, either.
 

ProfessorKaos64

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As long as you have a legal copy and are making a backup (playing by the rules OPs! :D), DVDfab works the best for me, and I have tried tonssssss of programs over the past decade. If you just have video files, the windows 7 dvd maker software works well on most new players.
 

Jon55

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This part I do not agree with...I've always preferred quality media (Taiyo Yuden or some Verbatim) without going overboard (MAM-A). Some of the cheap Taiwanese junk may work now, but your data almost assuredly won't last as long as it would with quality made-in-Japan media. I don't need a 100 year archival life, but I don't want the disc to be unplayable after 6 months - 1 year, either.

I do agree with you too on that bit. Not all blanks are equal in quality, but any major brand (Philips, Sony, Memorex, TDK, etc.) are all pretty solid.

That's fine, but you're neglecting the fact that some burners only support one or the other... So the choice might already be made.

Yes, but that number is even smaller than the number of players that only support DVD-R. So it's not really something to worry about.
 

ProfessorKaos64

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^ DVD -/+ R is not even an issue anymore, that stopped a long time ago, unless you have a fossil for a DVD player :D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-R#Competing_formats

I always use +R because of coming out later with improvements, but it doesnt matter anymore. Up until about 2004, the most favored on DVD players was DVD-R, but that was slim at best, as around then almost every player was of the hybrid type that would accept either.
 

Jon55

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I bought a laptop 2 years ago from Dell that only took DVD+R.

Then you got screwed pretty hard. I got a laptop 2 years ago from Apple that takes DVD - and + R and DVD - and + RW. I also got an iMac around 8 years ago that does all of those as well. My parents got a Dell around the same time that can do all of those too. My friend got a very cheap notebook around 3 years ago; it can also do all of those.

^ DVD -/+ R is not even an issue anymore, that stopped a long time ago, unless you have a fossil for a DVD player :D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-R#Competing_formats

I always use +R because of coming out later with improvements, but it doesnt matter anymore. Up until about 2004, the most favored on DVD players was DVD-R, but that was slim at best, as around then almost every player was of the hybrid type that would accept either.

Exactly. There's nothing wrong with either of the formats, it's just that some older DVD players can only do DVD-R. It's really only for compatibility's sake, but even then there is no reason to worry. You could most likely very well use DVD+R's and not have any issues whatsoever, but you just never know.
 

MrGuvernment

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There's more to DVD authoring than the contents of VIDEO_TS, though. That's why you need DVD Flick (or similar). ImgBurn can burn the VIDEO_TS folder, sure, but that alone isn't sufficient for playback in DVD players.

If FinalBurner doesn't work, try DVD Flick.

Ya, it kind of is.....never have i had a Video_Ts folder that didnt play just burning it to a disk, and i have been burning DVD for.... 12 years now
 
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on a lot of even modern cheap dvd players, a disc burned at 16x or higher will have increasing skipping issues as the disc is being read further into a movie. best advice would be to burn at the slowest rate possible for universal compatibility. however, if u have a better dvd player, u might as well burn at the highest speed since u can usually burn 3 discs in the time it takes to burn 1 disc at the slowest rate. but if u plan on using an xbox or ps2 to watch these movies, definitely burn at the slowest speed as stated
 
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